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Comment: Re:One init (Score 0) 120

by Guy Harris (#47409005) Attached to: CentOS Linux Version 7 Released On x86_64

Given the disconnects between the documentation and actual operation, it is a bad thing.

Did the posting to which you're responding mention systemd? Hint: the answer is "no"; it only mentions Mordor, and questions whether "from Mordor" is a bad thing or if it was the victim of a propaganda campaign (see the book to which the page I linked refers).

(Feel free to moderate that posting down as "Offtopic", instead.)

Comment: Re:News? (Score 1) 158

by Guy Harris (#47370523) Attached to: Russia Moves From Summer Time To Standard Time

But you still have to push the updated data files to the device. With embedded devies that's not necessarily simple.

And even if tzdata is updated, sometimes you need to tell programs to read the updated data, which isn't just a simple restart. One example is MySQL where you have to run mysql_tzinfo_to_sql to load the zoneinfo files into the internal equivalent (it's stored internally in database tables).

Yes, as I said in the post to which you replied:

But there still needs to be an update, and that might require restarting processes that have already loaded the now-out-of-date rule information, so, yeah, it's not as if the timezone cabal can wave their hands and magically update all the systems out there.

Comment: Re:News? (Score 1) 158

by Guy Harris (#47366589) Attached to: Russia Moves From Summer Time To Standard Time

So... How is this even tangentially related to being newsworthy for a tech site?

Like, seriously, WTF?!

It's newsworthy because we finally have proof that another countries legislature is at least, just as ridiculous as our own.

Note that the quoted statement can be made in a number of different countries; if you want proof that a lot of countries fuck around with daylight savings time rules, etc., just download the tzdata files and read.

Comment: Re:News? (Score 1) 158

by Guy Harris (#47366571) Attached to: Russia Moves From Summer Time To Standard Time

Even then its still a headache.

Just because someone else fixed the library, doesn't mean my servers and embedded devices have the update yet.

Presumably by "the library" you mean "the tzdata files"; this involves no code changes. The whole point of the Olson timezone database and library was to remove any knowledge of specific daylight savings time rules from any code whatsoever, so that changes to the rules could be handled without having to change source code, recompile, and relink every program (this was back in 1987, when shared libraries were still somewhat rare on UN*X systems). Thank you, Clorox and company.

But there still needs to be an update, and that might require restarting processes that have already loaded the now-out-of-date rule information, so, yeah, it's not as if the timezone cabal can wave their hands and magically update all the systems out there.

Comment: Re:Someone explain this to me (Score 1) 710

by Guy Harris (#47311871) Attached to: Workaholism In America Is Hurting the Economy

I remember back in the 1990s (I think) reading news stories about corporations pursuing 'increased productivity' per worker as a strategy for success, particularly in relation to international competition. Is there any other way to translate that language into plain English other than to say that what was desired was less wages for the same amount of work?

Yes. It could be translated as "more output for the same amount of work", if the increased productivity is per-work-hour productivity. Whether that translates into "less pay for the same amount of work" or not depends on whether wages grow with productivity. In the US, they grew with productivity from the late 1940's until the early 1970's, but haven't done so after that.

Comment: Re:The problem is not switch speed (Score 1) 183

by Guy Harris (#47308205) Attached to: How Vacuum Tubes, New Technology Might Save Moore's Law

Not the production process so much as the design process. It'd mean starting over from scratch with a whole new architecture, redoing decades of work in hardware and software.

Presumably the hardware and software to which you're referring is the hardware to manufacture the chips and the software used to design them, considering that the asynchronous processor that was "faster (~3x) and consume less energy (~2x)" was an "asynchronous, Pentium-compatible test chip that ran three times as fast, on half the power, as its synchronous equivalent.", so the asynchronous processors themselves don't have to have a shiny new instruction set architecture. (The original PDP-10 KA10 processor was asynchronous - "[the arithmetic processor] operates asynchronously using hardware subroutines, whereby the start of each operation is triggered by the completion of the previous operation rather than by a trigger from a synchronous timing chain" - but the KS10 was a synchronous microcoded machine using AMD 2900 bit-slices.)

Comment: Re:Half a century (Score 3, Informative) 113

by Guy Harris (#47260881) Attached to: Unisys Phasing Out Decades-Old Mainframe Processor For x86

Uh, I thought this was the descendant of Burroughs B5000? You know, the computer that Alan Kay tells everyone to take a look at to understand how silly today's architectures look in comparison.

It's both the descendants of the 36-bit Univac 1108 and the 48-bit-plus-tags Burroughs 6500 (very much like, but not compatible with, the B5000).

"I've seen the forgeries I've sent out." -- John F. Haugh II (jfh@rpp386.Dallas.TX.US), about forging net news articles

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