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Comment: Re:Can this be disabled? (Score 2) 112

by Guy Harris (#48661817) Attached to: Apple Pushes First Automated OS X Security Update

t has never done an automatic REBOOT during OS update

Lol.. that just means it replaced the files on disk.

You've been running with the vulnerable libraries/executable loaded in memory until you restarted the OS or whatever program loaded those files.

At least on the machines in our household (Mountain Lion and Mavericks), NTPD was restarted as part of the update process, without an OS reboot.

Comment: Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (Score 2) 66

by Guy Harris (#48472779) Attached to: DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Solaris has their own init deamon, SMF. *BSD has their own, in fact Linux is the only one who have used SysVinit for several years now.

Yes, I'm aware of SMF. However, *BSD's init isn't different from traditional init - in fact, it's arguably closer to traditional init than is SysVinit, given that *BSD init is modeled after Research UNIX init, which predates the AT&T run-level-/etc/inittab-based init. They both use rc scripts to launch non-Internet system services, unlike launchd and systemd.

Comment: Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (Score 1) 66

by Guy Harris (#48470401) Attached to: DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Desktops and servers are hardly the entirety of the world. They don't even dominate it. Ever heard of ARM?

Yes, but I don't see any support for it, or any non-x86 architecture, in the DragonFly BSD source tree, so I don't think DragonFly BSD is that interested in embedded systems.

If Linus felt that way about 32-bit, there would be no Android, or it would have to develop its own kernel. Sheesh. FreeBSD and linux are found in routers and such with very weak CPUs.

So they've made different choices than DragonFly BSD.

Comment: Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (Score 1) 66

by Guy Harris (#48470341) Attached to: DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Hey, now that the systemd nutters have broken Linux we can go back to calling Unix Unix instead of *nix.

At least one trademarked Unix uses a launch-on-demand-based init daemon, so it's not clear that the use of systemd-the-daemon is sufficient to make Linux not be a Un*x. Maybe systemd-the-software-bundle is sufficient.

Comment: Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (Score 1) 66

by Guy Harris (#48470303) Attached to: DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

What does Unix have to do with the Linux kernel? *nix is used for various "Unixes"

What's a "Unix"?

Is it a system based on AT&T code? If so, how much AT&T code has to still be in it.

Is it a system that passes the Single UNIX Specification test suite and whose supplier is thus allowed to license the "Unix" trademark?

Is it a system with a Unix-compatible API?

formerly also because of possible trademark issues. Linux is not one of them.

Linux is not one of the first types of OS in that list (if there are any bits of code AT&T made publicly available that are in Linux userlands, they're probably small enough not to count), and I know of no Linux distribution that's passed the SUS test suite (unless K-UX is a Linux distribution), so no Linux distribution I know of is one of the second types of OS in that list.

Linux is (or, rather, most Linux distribution are) most definitely one of the third types of OS, and people do speak of those OSes as "Un*xes", at least, even if "*nix" is used only for the first type of OS.

Comment: Re:Put your money where your mouth is. (Score 1) 247

by Guy Harris (#48453703) Attached to: Does Being First Still Matter In America?

I can't verify the source, but this article suggests the machines will be Power8 based. Assuming these are the machines in question.

No, those machines are being built for the Department of Energy (DoE); NOAA, for whom the machines being discussed in this thread are being built, is part of the Department of Commerce.

Comment: Re:Perspective (Score 1) 338

by Guy Harris (#48452545) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

I hear ya buddy. We've got a President who doesn't want to do things democratically and we had a major, society-altering law passed whose authors have nothing but contempt for us, the American people.

Yes, a law such as this one, as passed in the GP's country, would have done a better job than the law in question.

Comment: Re:Put your money where your mouth is. (Score 1) 247

by Guy Harris (#48431397) Attached to: Does Being First Still Matter In America?

So much wrong in just a few sentences.

First, IBM didn't sell it's HPC group, or its Power Systems group.

Correct.

The computer in question wouldn't be made using x86

If the computer in question is the same one mentioned in IBM's 2012 press release, not correct - that speaks of "IBM iDataPlex servers", which are x86 servers, not Power Architecture servers.

Comment: Re:Amnesty International (Score 4, Informative) 95

by Guy Harris (#48430145) Attached to: Amnesty International Releases Tool To Combat Government Spyware

Amnesty International has a terrible track record of attacking Western Democracies disproportionately more so than Dictatorships. I guess they like picking on easy targets, instead of actually trying to make a difference. When is the last time we heard them lobby government action in Africa or the Middle-East?

You mean like this, for Syria, or this, for Iraq, and archived campaigns such as this, for South Sudan, and this, for the Central African Republic?

One of the chief duties of the mathematician in acting as an advisor... is to discourage... from expecting too much from mathematics. -- N. Wiener

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