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+ - Ask Slashdot: Hungry students, how common ? 1

Submitted by Gud
Gud (78635) writes "Opening the newspaper this morning this story hit me like bricks, as I recalled a number of these experiences from my time as grad student. http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

I remember choosing between eating, living in bad neighborhoods, putting gas in the car, etc. Me and my fellow students still refer to ourself as the "starving grad students." Today we laugh about these experiences because we all got good jobs that lifted us out of poverty, but not everyone is that fortunate.
I wonder how many students are having hard time concentrating on their studies due to worrying where the next meal comes from. In the article I found the attitude of collage admins to the idea of meal plan point sharing, telling as how little they care about anything else but soak students & parents for fees and pester them later on with requests for donations.
Last year I did the college tour for my first child, after reading the article, some of the comments I heard on that tour started making more sense. Like "During exams you go to the dining hall in the morning, eat and study all day for one swipe" or "One student is doing study on what happens when you live only on Ramen noodles!"
How common is "food insecurity in college or high school" ?
What tricks can you share with current students?"

+ - Stung By File-Encrypting Malware, Researchers Fight Back->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "When Jose Vildoza's father became the victime of ransomware, he launched his own investigation. Diving into CryptoDefense's code, he found its developers had made a crucial mistake: CryptoDefense used Microsoft's Data Protection API (application programming interface), a tool in the Windows operating system to encrypt a user's data, which stored a copy of the encryption keys on the affected computer. Vildoza and researcher, Fabian Wosar of the Austrian security company Emsisoft, collaborated on a utility called the Emsisoft Decrypter that could recover the encrypted keys. In mid-March Vildoza had launched a blog chronicling his investigation, purposely not revealing the mistake CryptoDefense's authors had made. But Symantec then published a blog post on March 31 detailing the error."
Link to Original Source
Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the bending-the-rules dept.
Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"
IBM

+ - IBM battles dire mainframe myths ->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The perception of mainframe technology as outmoded or inefficient is wildly inaccurate in a number of important ways, according to IBM's chief architect for cloud computing, Frank DeGilio.

In a presentation at the Share user conference Wednesday entitled "Hex, Lies and Videoblogs," the IBM mainframe expert argued that the conventional wisdom on big iron is plagued by several myths like cost, software opportunities ..."

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Idle

Sound As the New Illegal Narcotic? 561

Posted by samzenpus
from the you-ever-see-the-back-of-a-$20-bill-on-sound? dept.
ehrichweiss writes "The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics is warning parents and teachers of a new threat to our children: sounds. Apparently kids are now discovering binaural beats and using them to get 'physiological effects.' The report goes on with everyone suggesting that such aural experiences will act as a gateway to drug usage and even has one student claiming there are 'demons' involved. Anyone who has used one of those light/sound machines knows all about the effects that these sounds will give and to state that they will lead kids to do drugs is nonsense at best. It seems the trend in scaring the citizens with a made-up problem has gone to the next level."
Image

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Internet 92

Posted by samzenpus
from the vicky-who? dept.
MMBK writes "Our friends at JESS3 have unveiled The Ex-Blocker. It's a Firefox and Chrome plugin that erases all name and likeness of your ex from the Internet, even if they become a meme, or the president. You'll no longer have to threaten to delete your Facebook account or concoct an elaborate e-hoax to assuage the reality-shattering complications that are born from break-ups. Simply construct an Internet that omits bad vibes all together."
Java

+ - Sun Pushes Emergency Java Patch->

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "In a sudden about-face, Sun has rushed out a Java update to fix a drive-by download vulnerability that exposed Windows users to in-the-wild malware attacks.The patch comes less than a week after Sun told a Google researcher it did not consider the issue serious enough to warrant an out-of-cycle patch and less than a day after researchers spotted live exploits on a booby-trapped Web site. The flaw, which was also discovered independently by Ruben Santamarta, occurs because the Java-Plugin Browser is running “javaws.exe” without validating command-line parameters. Despite the absence of documentation, a researcher was about to figure out that Sun removed the code to run javaws.exe from the Java plugin. The about-face by Sun is another sign that some big vendors still struggle to understand the importance of working closely with white hat researchers to understand the implications of certain vulnerabilities. In this case, Google’s Tavis Ormandy was forced to use the full-disclosure weapon to force the vendor into a proper response."
Link to Original Source
Idle

+ - Need to fix a grade, a 3'rd grader can help 1

Submitted by Gud
Gud (78635) writes "In the Washington Post this morning there is a story about a 9 year old that was able to do anything he wanted to grades in his school in a system supplied by Blackboard.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/14/AR2010041404159.html?hpid=newswell

This comes on the heals of an other story about high-school students installing key loggers at their high school and going back and changing grades.

The question now is when will all the applicants to Harward submit transcripts that only have A's ?"
Privacy

+ - Young Adults Care About Privacy->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "According to the Associated Press, a new joint UC-Berkeley/U.Penn study finds that young people, contrary to media reports, do care about privacy online:

Although they grew up in the digital age, young people know surprisingly little about their rights to online privacy, the study found. They seem more confident than older adults that the government would protect them, even though U.S. privacy laws offer few such safeguards. The lack of knowledge about the law, coupled with an online environment that encourages people to share personal information, may be one reason young people can seem careless about privacy...

"

Link to Original Source

+ - Iceland Volcano Ash Grounds European Air Travel->

Submitted by Ch_Omega
Ch_Omega (532549) writes "From the article at CBSNews:
"An ash-spewing volcano in Iceland emptied the skies of aircraft across much of northern Europe on Thursday, grounding planes on a scale unseen since the 9/11 terror attacks. British air space shut down, silencing the trans-Atlantic hub of Heathrow and stranding tens of thousands of passengers around the world.

Aviation officials said it was not clear when it would be safe enough to fly again and said it was the first time in living memory that an ash cloud had brought one of the world's most congested airspaces to a standstill. "

BBC News, Deccan Herald and Barents Observer has more coverage."

Link to Original Source

+ - NSA Warrantless Wiretapping Whistleblower Indicted-> 1

Submitted by elrous0
elrous0 (869638) writes "Thomas Andrews Drake, a former NSA official, was charged Thursday in the U.S. District Court of Maryland with allegedly leaking classified National Security Agency (NSA) documents to an unnamed reporter during his time with the agency. It is widely believed that Drake was one of the unnamed whistleblowers who revealed the NSA's secret (and illegal) warrantless wiretapping program to New York Times reporters in 2005 (along with Justice Department lawyer Thomas Tamm). “Our national security demands that the sort of conduct alleged here — violating the government’s trust by illegally retaining and disclosing classified information — be prosecuted and prosecuted vigorously,” said Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer in a statement."
Link to Original Source

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