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Submission + - Pirate Party not giving up after BPI legal action (

An anonymous reader writes: UK political group, the Pirate Party insists it will continue to fight for digital rights despite being threatened with legal action by the UK’s music industry body over links to the Pirate Bay website

Elected members of the parties National Executive Committee, along with the head of IT, received letters from lawyers acting for British Phonographic Industry (BPI), threatening them personally with High Court legal action.

A proxy server was initially provided in solidarity with other parties in Europe, but soon became an anti-censorship resource for UK users after the 'Big Six' ISPs were forced by court order to begin blocking The Pirate Bay. Access to the proxy server has been removed.

Frances Nash, IP Lawyer at Manchester solicitors, Ralli, commented on behalf of the Pirate Party:

"Despite attempts by elected members to resolve this situation, the law at present is clear and makes any decision to continue hosting the proxy untenable.

This is not the outcome the party wanted however, any challenge to this proposed action would make it financially impossible for the party to deal with other issues for which they actively campaign on a daily basis.

The Pirate Party strongly believe that site blocking is both disproportionate and ineffective and will continue to lobby for digital rights and their wider manifesto.”

Your Rights Online

Submission + - BPI Threatens to Sue The UK Pirate Party over Proxy (

Techmeology writes: "The BPI has threatened to sue the Pirate Party for allowing people access to The Pirate Bay through its proxy service. The leader of the Pirate Party UK, Loz Kaye said his party would go to court over the issue. Kaye said that he was determined to defend his party's principles even in the face of an expensive legal battle."

Submission + - UK Pirate Party seeking donations to fight legal threats against its TPB proxy (

azzy writes: The BPI (music industry body in the United Kingdom) has threatened legal action against leaders of the Pirate Party UK for their continued running of a proxy to ThePirateBay.

The Pirate Party UK is operating this proxy as a high profile fight against corporate-motivated censorship of the internet and is now raising money to help fight this legal action.

PPUK is aiming to assemble a legal team that is capable of putting together a case that will not only keep the proxy in place, but also settle the issues surrounding the arbitrary censorship of the web.

See also:


Submission + - UK courts ordered to block The Pirate Bay ( 1

nk497 writes: "A UK court has ordered five top ISPs to block users from accessing The Pirate Bay. However, the UK's largest ISP, BT, has asked for "a few more weeks to further consider their position", although it isn't yet clear exactly why. The ISPs are being forced via courts to block the site after refusing to do so after a request from music lobby group BPI last year.

The block follows a similar case with Newzbin last year. Of course, that site remains available in the UK after it simply switched domains."


Submission + - UK Anti-Piracy Law Survives Court Challenge (

Grumbleduke writes: The UK's controversial Digital Economy Act survived it's second court challenge today. Two ISPs had appealed last year's ruling that the measures included did not breach EU law and, for the most part, the Court of Appeal agreed, ruling in favour of the Government and the 10 unions and industry groups supporting the law in court.

The decision was welcomed by the industry groups, but criticised by the UK's Pirate Party, whose leader pointed to the lack of evidence that the law would have any positive effects. A UK copyright specialist noted that the ISPs may still appeal the decision to the UK's Supreme Court, seeking a reference to the Courts of Justice of the European Union, and wondered if the law could now attract the same attention from the Internet as SOPA and ACTA.

The law is still some way from being implemented, and the first notifications are not expected to be sent to alleged file-sharers before 2013, and the next steps could also be open to a legal challenge.


Submission + - Pop artists support Megaupload; Universal censors 1

TheSHAD0W writes: Several well-known artists, including P. Diddy, Will.I.Am, Snoop Dogg and Kanye West produced a song in support of the site Megaupload, recently targeted by law enforcement as a "rogue site". The music video was gaining popularity — until Youtube received a takedown notice from Universal Media Group, claiming it violated their copyrights.

Submission + - Anti-Piracy firm e-mails reveal firm scam ( 4

Khyber writes: "A recent DDoS attack against a UK-based anti-pirating firm, known as ACS:Law, has resulted in a large backup archive of the server contents being made available for download, which has been done and is now being hosted by the Pirate Bay. Within this archive are e-mails from Andrew Crossley basically admitting that he is running a scam job, sending out thousands of frivolous legal threats on the premise that a percentage pay up immediately to avoid legal hassles."

Submission + - Interview with the UK Pirate Party leader (

VJ42 writes: With the 2010 UK general election fast approaching, The Pirate party of the United Kingdom will be fielding elections for the first time. With the Digital economy bill and ACTA being hot topics for UK geeks, the Pirate party looks to pick up votes. Their leader Andrew Robinson has agreed to answer your questions. Normal Interview rules apply.

"People should have access to the data which you have about them. There should be a process for them to challenge any inaccuracies." -- Arthur Miller