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Comment: Re:This sentence from TFA says it all (Score 1) 94

by jedidiah (#47980405) Attached to: Now That It's Private, Dell Targets High-End PCs, Tablets

> Desktops are overvalued @200 dollars compared to cheap tablets with 2-4 cores and 1-2GB of ram for ~50 dollars...

Those desktops will still run circles around the tablets once you stray off the reservation. They are good at some very narrow tasks only. The moment you do something interesting that wasn't accounted for in the SoC, you are screwed.

Cheap tablets have to "outsource" any voice recognition to some server across the network.

The overvalued desktop can do that stuff on it's own.

A lot of ARM devices are pretty useless without some sort of mothership running a real CPU.

Comment: Re:Customer as Quality Control (Score 1) 94

by jedidiah (#47980361) Attached to: Now That It's Private, Dell Targets High-End PCs, Tablets

My all time least favorite name brand PC is actually Apple.

Of all of the brands I have dealt with, it is by far the most crapulent. My brand name PCs that are supposed to be so sh*tty just chug along and do their job until they become too obsolete to tweak anymore.

Plus, Macs are relatively untweakable relegating them to doorstop status quicker than some clone sh*tbox.

Comment: Re:Mind boggling (Score 1) 94

by jedidiah (#47980195) Attached to: Now That It's Private, Dell Targets High-End PCs, Tablets

HELL, there was an article about this last week talking about how vulture capitalists love to take over sensibly run companies and then trash them for short tern gain. By sensible, I mean that they own their own facilities. This means something like a restaurant chain owning their own buildings.

The vultures will come in, swoop down, sell off the real estate and set up lease back scams saddling the once well engineered company with ugly ongoing operating costs. The proceeds from the real estate sales will be sucked out by the vultures.

THAT is Wall Street.

Comment: Re:I'll just let my sig do the talking (Score 1) 426

by Grishnakh (#47980191) Attached to: US Strikes ISIL Targets In Syria

"Kept in check" via the same bloodthirsty violence we're seeing now, just under different management. Brilliant.

The same? I'd like to see the numbers of people dying under Saddam's rule, compared to how many people have died under the new government which replaced him.

No doubt, Saddam was a tyrant, but he also provided regional stability. Some heads had to roll to maintain that stability, but was it as many as are dying now?

Comment: Re: Read Slashdot (Score 1) 386

by jedidiah (#47977379) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

Nope. If it's not in an area relevant to the kinds of jobs he's been applying for, that PhD might as well be in philosophy. Most employers are cheapskate dirt bags. They're already trying to undercut you with outsourcing and H1-Bs. You need to demonstrate that you're going to be valuable to them and a good value.

Having an overpriced degree undermines that. They don't care about your extra brownie points. They certainly don't want to pay extra for them.

There is also such a thing as being overqualified.

The whole "they resent my brilliance" attitude is a clear manifestation of this.

Comment: Re:Solution (Score 1) 273

Too complex - there's no need for taxation anymore. It's all a holdover from real money. With fiat currency (since 1971) the government can just print as much money as it needs. The personal income tax raises about $400 billion, which is only about 10% of the budget.

The only reason for taxation in 2014 is to show that the labor of "citizens" is collateral for the borrowing of the Federal government. But with debts > 1x GDP and unfunded mandates in excess of 10x GDP, even that appears to be unnecessary at this point.

Comment: Re:Corporate taxes (Score 1, Flamebait) 273

If you are whining about US taxation rates you are clearly a poser that has never had any actual experience with this stuff. The US tax code specifically panders to corporations. The nominal rates are a pure fiction to distract ignorant RV dwelling GOP supporters.

Comment: Why the Hell did you get PhD? (Score 1) 386

by bill_mcgonigle (#47976155) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

No, seriously, why? I hope it's because there was a topic you're interested in. You didn't say, but it'd have to be an awfully bullshit topic to have no interest to anyone anywhere.

Obviously sending in resumes through the front door is a waste of time. Work your network.

If you just did a PhD to kill time, then you're just a C++ developer who's been out of work for six years. If your thesis had nothing to do with the job you're applying for then *FOR THEM* you're just a C++ developer who's been out of work for six years. Maybe they wanted to know if you're aware of C++11 or whatever and that's why they were asking those questions.

But, for Pete's sake, you owe it to yourself to discover who your network knows (do you do LinkedIn?) in an industry that could use your interest's knowledge, and apply it. Unless you decided that after the PhD you hate that topic (it happens) and then you're just starting over.

You should have made friends with all of the faculty at your school while you were there, and not hidden in a cave for six years. Did you do that? Ask them for favors - maybe you can return them some day. The way it works is they help you then you help then, and it's a non-zero-sum game, but somebody has to go first.

Comment: Re:Funny how this works ... (Score 1) 173

by bill_mcgonigle (#47975289) Attached to: Netflix Rejects Canadian Regulator Jurisdiction Over Online Video

and Netflix can support customers paying via alternate methods who are willing to stream over a VPN -- so the result of this conflict is that both sides lose, and the citizen (not consumer, although them too) loses even more.

It's a conspiracy by the Bitcoin illuminati! Who knew they had moles inside the CRTC?!?

Comment: Re:Funny how this works ... (Score 1) 173

by bill_mcgonigle (#47975149) Attached to: Netflix Rejects Canadian Regulator Jurisdiction Over Online Video

Really? A radio and TV communications commission can block legal credit card transactions?

Presumably they simply rule the product as being 'illegal' and then the transactions also become such and there are extant mechanisms for interfering with those.

And, yes, political regulators have the ability to find a way to destroy ANY business - that seems to be what most voters want. The current system is based on silent consent - those not loudly objecting are considered to be supporting.
It's a stupid framework, but that's how it is.

Comment: Re:Does it matter? (Score 2) 123

by bill_mcgonigle (#47975005) Attached to: Google Quietly Nixes Mandatory G+ Integration With Gmail

I fail to understand how they don't just have a Google account and then you go into some kind of 'setup' or 'preferences' panel and check/uncheck boxes for 'enable: Picassa, YouTube, GMail, Plus, Reader (oops), Wallet', etc. If that's too complex it can be automatically enabled if you go to the relevant service and try to use it (upload a picture, post an update, etc.).

I don't believe that Google is irrational, but by making their services as hard to use as possible (I know, don't read the YouTube commments...) they limit page views to some extent, which much affect their advertising stream - but I haven't seen the wisdom of why they want to do that.

Is it just that disk space is expensive and the consumption stream size's increase is only proportional to the creation stream's size on a diminishing returns scale? I could possibly buy that - I have a hundred videos in my Watch Later queue on YouTube, so they won't make any more money on my views than they would if they made it easier to upload, edit, and share videos.

Comment: Re:Please describe exactly (Score 1) 390

Right. So when any of the normal annual changes take place (the way they handle certain experimental drugs or therapies, the way they handle certain hospital scenarios, etc), the insurer can no longer provide the plan - the ACA shuts it down because it doesn't provide post-menopausal women maternity care, etc.

So I am a bit confused about why that is a problem. The cost to the insurer of offering maternity care to post-menopausal women should be about zero. Why not tack that onto an otherwise good plan if that's what the law requires? Wouldn't that make more sense than scrapping the plan for such a flimsy reason?

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