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Comment: Re:Links, such as these: (Score 0) 227

by Gresyth (#42455049) Attached to: That Link You Just Posted Could Cost You 300 Euros

Comment: Re:Yeah, I want a Sony Pony too (Score 0) 386

by Gresyth (#36111776) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Should Sony Compensate PSN Users?
Your 2 free games will be 8-bit releases from the late 1970's. WE think McDonalds is a FINE restaurant. We at Sony are pleased to announce we have just hired Jocelyn Wildenstein as our new Social Events representative. There is a fine mansion that has just become available in Abbottabad Pakistan. Take your pick of these fine yachts. http://madmariner.com/files/images/NEW_ORLEANS_KATRINA_MARINA_DAMAGE_011008_AP-P0.jpg (salvage costs are your responsibility). Your Thai play toy is eager to meet you. ( she has AIDS, herpes and Hepatitis )
Businesses

+ - The Boom (or Bubble) in Federal Cybersecurity

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "The Washington Post reports that the increasing number and intensity of cyberattacks has attracted the attention of the Obama administration and Congress, which have begun steering dollars to the problem and much of that new spending, estimated at $6 to $7 billion annually just in unclassified work, is focused on the Washington region, as the federal government consolidates many of its cybersecurity-focused agencies in the area. "I think it is a real growth opportunity in coming years," says David Z. Bodenheimer, a partner at law firm Crowell & Moring in Washington who leads the firm's homeland security practice and specializes in government contracts. "The market is still rather fragmented and in flux, but is developing with a speed that it is attracting both the major defense and homeland security contractors who are establishing independent business units to pursue these opportunities, and it is also a real opportunity for the smaller players who have niche products." One reason the field is attracting so many companies is that the barriers to entry are low — at least relative to other defense industries but as start-ups and others rush to stake claims, some wonder if a bubble of sorts is beginning to inflate and recall that many venture firms in the early 2000s chased similar prospects. "A lot of the early people made significant money," says Roger Novak, founder of Novak Biddle Venture Partners. "but there were [also] a lot of 'me too' companies.""

Comment: Up to Xbps (Score 1) 454

by Gresyth (#31454164) Attached to: FCC Asks You To Test Your Broadband Speeds
The thing everyone misses when they gripe about their ISP and the down/up speeds is that the ISPs all advertise bandwidth "up to" the rate they are selling. NO ISP can guarantee bandwidth as there are too many factors beyond their control that affect it. No ISP advertises a set value, its always, "up to" Xbps. The "up to" is usually in the fine print or an * but that is our responsibility to notice under current laws.

Comment: Its legal if the govt says so (Score 0) 785

by Gresyth (#28901279) Attached to: School System Considers Jamming Students' Phones
Perhaps this school system can go the route of the Maryland Correctional system.

The Associated Press Wednesday, July 15, 2009; 8:27 AM Maryland's top corrections official is scheduled to testify in favor of legislation to allow states to get permission from the federal government to jam illegal cell phones in prisons. Gary Maynard, who is the secretary for the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, is set to testify before a Senate committee on Wednesday. Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski also is scheduled to appear. She is a co-sponsor of legislation that would allow states to petition the Federal Communications Commission to use jamming technologies in prisons where illegal cell phone use is a significant problem.

Comment: Re:So like where is the rest of the stuff? The goo (Score 2, Informative) 392

by Gresyth (#28604609) Attached to: Jammie Thomas Moves To Strike RIAA $1.92M Verdict
From her attorneys brief asking for the appeal: The second Gore factor is the factor commonly expressed in ratios of punitive to actual damages: "the disparity between the actual or potential harm suffered by the plaintiff and the punitive damages award." Campbell, 538 U.S. at 418. Although the Supreme Court has declined to state a bright-line rule about the maximum permissible ratio, it has repeatedly held that "few awards exceeding a single-digit ratio between punitive and compensatory damages, to a significant degree, will satisfy due process." Id. at 425. Even if, on occasion, awards with two-digit or even three-digit ratios are permissible, the damages award in this case, with its four-digit ratio looked at by album and five-digit ratio looked at by song is nowhere close to constitutionally permissible. "In sum, courts must ensure that the measure of punishment is both reasonable and proportionate to the amount of harm to the plaintiff and to the general damages recovered." Id. at 426.

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