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Comment Copenhagen really is the city of the future (Score 4, Interesting) 80

I had the pleasure of spending a couple of weeks in Copenhagen earlier this year. The public transport is excellent, there are separate cycle paths with their own traffic lights everywhere, and now you can rent an electric car if you absolutely need one. We used the train a lot and walked around many Km too. It was easy to rent a car when we did need one but if I lived there it is highly unlikely I would want to own one because the traffic is pretty bad and the public transport offered is excellent. The car is such a dinosaur when it comes to getting around a city.

Comment Get a 3 SIM in Sweden and travel freely with it. (Score 1) 142

Last time I was in the UK, I bought a SIM from 3 and one of the features I didn't realise at the time was that I could use my phone abroad with that SIM exactly as I had in the UK. After I finished in the UK, I flew to Denmark and when I fired up the phone 3DK welcomed me to their network allowing me to use my unlimited UK data and also call and be called from UK numbers as if I was still in the UK. This was amazing based on previous experience with roaming from country to country. I drove over to Sweden and the same thing happened. Now that's all well and good, but what about the US? Turns out, when I landed in LAX, I was welcomed to AT&T's network and my unlimited data continued to work (3G only but still, not bad) and then I flew on to NZ and found myself on 2Degrees and still the phone and data worked. If you're not already with 3, I would strongly suggest switching. You can always buy a local cheap phone in the US for doing calls to US numbers, or do as I did and get some Skype credit which will go over the data.

Comment Re:iPhone 6+ (Score 2) 208

Another vote for the iPhone 6+. I've actually run it for five days without a charge just to see how long I could make it last. If you really hammer it with games and stuff then you'll chew through the battery but if you use it to make a few calls, do a bit of e-mail and text then it will last a working week. I do carry one of those little extra battery packs just in case and frankly, whenever I have a chance to charge my devices I take it but knowing that my phone always has days and days of power in reserve is so much better than it was with my old iPhone 4.

Comment Xbox One went from a nope to probably nope (Score 3, Interesting) 193

I've had a 360 since launch (technically three if you count the replacement motherboards) and I would have got the One if it had backwards compatibility, even to the standard that the 360 could play original Xbox games by using most of the on disc assets but having a recompiled native engine for the PPC chip in the 360. This doesn't look quite like that unfortunately but I'll watch with interest as I'm not sure how much longer my 360 will survive and there are still games on it I would like to play through again. If it does support enough of the games I already own (the list currently has none) then I may well add an Xbox One to go with my PS4.

Comment Re:Windows is obsolete. (Score 1) 133

"Of those 1.37 billion web requests, over 58% came from a Windows system. Even Windows 8.1 alone has more users than OS X does in total, and that's one of the most despised versions of Windows!"

Lets think back to 2000 or so when around 99% of web requests were coming from Windows and think about just how far Windows has fallen in that time. While I agree that Mac OS X isn't really setting the world on fire (and I say that as a Mac user) I do see an awful lot of Macs out there and far more than there were in 2000 so Apple has certainly made up a lot of ground. Also, consider that when you're sitting at a desktop you're likely using the web a lot, but a phone is just occasional use so the fact that 42% of web requests aren't coming from Windows tells you a lot about how much kit is out there that is connecting to the internet. The important change since 2000 is that you could barely manage on the web without IE on Windows. I know, I was a Linux user then and browsing was very painful at times. These days, the web is much better to use because it has to handle all these different browsers on phones and alternative desktops. The thing that kept Windows at the top for all of the 90's was the fact that alternatives couldn't get a shoe in the door. These days, it is very easy to drop Windows. If you want a nice desktop, a Mac is a really good place to go because you get a real desktop OS without all that touch screen, phone UI rubbish shoved into it. You want a phone that works well as a phone and has lots of software? Android and iOS have you covered. Windows has lost the software high ground and the only reason it still has 58% of web requests going to it is simply inertia. MS is desperate to slow the slide but it keeps on going down. I've used Windows 10 and I don't see anything there that will stop this process if they can't get devs to actually put out apps that are unique to Windows and attractive. I don't think they can get back to the heyday of the 90's and having lived and worked through it, I don't think they ever should because we're in a much better place today with real choice. MS should be happy that they still have any customers under the circumstances given just how badly they treated everyone when they were on top.

Comment Halo effect? (Score 1) 317

Microsoft heard about this halo effect around the iPod and now iPhone bringing people to the Mac and totally misunderstood what it meant. Hence, Cortana and Spartan.

I don't care what they name it but it will definitely have Microsoft..... in the name and as others have said, they'll likely stick with the Spartan branding and maybe even pile on the 'Halo' theme even more. Pity Halo itself is a smoking shell these days. Halo 4 was just sad.

Comment I don't see the advantage (Score 1) 3

European universities are really good. The overall education standard in Europe is higher than the US and while there's some possibility that they may want to work in the US in the future it shouldn't be impossible for them if they've got relatives there to get in even without citizenship. They can work in any european country they like so there's plenty of opportunities without forcing them to go through the tax burden of being a US citizen. Having lived and worked in the US myself (silicon valley) I just don't see the attraction other than maybe money but the standard of living isn't great all things considered.

Comment No marketshare == still no marketshare (Score 1) 445

Here's MS' problem, there's a strong perception that they don't exist in the phone market. I was watching the news the other day and they were covering various gadgets and they had this thing which paired over bluetooth with a phone and had an app. The reviewer actually said that it supports all smartphones, both android and iPhone. Boom, there's your problem MS. No-one even knows or cares that you exist.

As a long time Linux user, it feels good that MS is getting killed because no-one is supporting their product however good it may be.

Comment Good grief.... (Score 1) 6

OK, so the post, moderate etc buttons are green text on a green background, and the stories list on the home page doesn't have the old 'more' button but instead has 'days' which frankly don't work because I'm in a country that is a day ahead of the US so 'today' is yesterday and I have to read thursday to get friday etc. Bring back the more button. Don't get me started on how messed up the layout is in Safari - I'm having to use Chrome just to get the thing to be legible.

Comment Obligatory Red Dwarf quote (Score 4, Funny) 531

Dave Lister: Sometimes I think it's cruel giving machines a personality. My mate Petersen once brought a pair of shoes with artificial intelligence. Smart Shoes, they were called. It was a neat idea. No matter how blind drunk you were, they would always get you home. Then he got ratted one night in Oslo, and woke up the next morning in Burma. See, the shoes got bored just going from his local to the flat. They wanted to see the world, man, y'know? He had a helluva job getting rid of them. No matter who he sold them to, they'd show up again the next day! He tried to shut them out, but they just kicked the door down, y'know?

Arnold Rimmer: Is this true?

Dave Lister: Yeah! Last thing he heard, they'd sort of, erm, robbed a car and drove it into a canal. They couldn't steer, y'see.

Arnold Rimmer: Really?!

Dave Lister: Yeah. Petersen was really, really blown away by it. He went to see a priest. The priest told him, he said, it was alright, and all that, and the shoes were happy, and they'd gone to heaven. Y'see, it turns out shoes have soles.

Comment Re:Realistic (Score 1) 374

Here (NZ), we use a lot of hydro power. In fact the electricity company I use is 100% renewables. The benefit of hydro is you can also use it as a battery and use excess generation from houses with rooftop solar to pump water back up into the reservoir storing the energy for use at night when solar doesn't work. Here we've also been having a series of dry spells which have caused issues with the reservoirs emptying too quickly and running the risk of blackouts, and again having distributed solar on houses will help a great deal to conserve the energy stored in the hydro lakes.

I've just taken out a loan to reroof my house and put solar up and I will be selling the excess energy back to the supplier - the savings will cover my usual electricity bill and offset the cost of the extra debt but then again I had to get a new roof anyway as the current one is leaking so why not put solar up at the same time? Sure, I'll still have to pay for the connection but in the end it is a win win. More to the point, next year I plan on getting a fully electric car to replace the current petrol model (we rarely do more than 50Km a day so it will be ample) and that will also be charged off the roof so I'll save a good chunk of money there. Most of our electricity use is during the day anyway because that is when we run our AC units mostly. A bit of thought and we can be rid of fossil fuels.

Comment Programming or 'computer skills' training? (Score 4, Insightful) 120

When I was a school (many many years ago) computers were metal boxes with black and white (or green) screens and a flashing cursor. That's it. We were taught logic, binary and all that stuff. In school. We learned structured programming, some minor graphics but mostly it was how to do calculations, and make decisions etc. That set me up to pick up multiple programming languages over the years, and I moved from 8 bit through to 64 bit computers with ease. A decade or so after I had finished, schools were focussing on teaching computer skills which pretty much focussed on how to do 'things' in Windows or on a Mac and no-one knew jack about how the computer worked, especially the teachers. The result has been a generation of people who really know nothing about computers or computer science. If we taught other sciences like this we would still be thinking of elements like 'air' and 'fire' etc. Students need to know what is going on rather than skipping all that and focussing on making powerpoints.

panic: kernel trap (ignored)

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