Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Perhaps this is why some places are better (Score 2) 108 108

You seem to be verifying what I said.

There is a serious difference between saying negative things to/about someone and being rude. Learning that is one of the things that happens as people grow up.

Telling someone to their face that you don't like them does not show that you have anything other than a severe lack of tact. That is not honesty. At times, it can be straightforward stupidity.

There are very few people that I/we loathe. There are certainly plenty around that I would rather be somewhere else than next to but that is not the same thing. Loathing implies a wish to harm. One of the last times this country wished anyone harm, our prime minister obediently followed your president into Iraq. That was one of the most amazingly stupid things ever done by a British leader in centuries. We are now living with the consequences. I want us to go back to not loathing as soon as possible!

As for the empire, my ancestors gave it back to the peoples that their ancestors had taken it from. On the whole, we are still on good terms with most of them.

Comment: Perhaps this is why some places are better to live (Score 4, Interesting) 108 108

Something that has been in the news a few times is how some places are better to live than others.
I regularly see people from the USA strongly disputing this. How can anywhere possibly be better to live than the US? You have your Constitution, various amendments and some of you have a lot of money.

If this is right, perhaps it is to do with manners. So often your countryfolk seem brusque at best and just plain rude a lot of the time. This is definitely not all of you and not everyone in Denmark and Bhutan are amazingly polite at all times. What is evident though is that rudeness can be taken as a badge of honour in some places. In others politeness is seen as the target.

Example: A couple of years ago, I was taking part in a discussion about the treatment of transgender people. My attitude is that if someone has gone through all "that process", it is just good manners to call them what they want to be. This was taken by some that I am somewhere in the LGBTIQ... spectrum. I'm not. I'm straight white Northern European but also a (usually) polite Brit.

It would be interesting to compare where is supposed to be good and bad places to live with their local norms of politeness.

Comment: Some US usages can be coped with here on earth. (Score 1) 830 830

The trouble is that you also come out with some strange ones.

An acre foot? Weight in pounds but no major units? Farenheit???

Fortunately, there is google to convert things and I am pretty good at mental arithmetic.
An acre foot is 325,851 and 2 fifths US "gallons" or 271,328.07 normal gallons. For those of us here on Earth, that is 1,233,481.84 litres. We laugh at "furlongs per hogshead" but this is pretty similar.
When old people here give their heights, they use feet and inches and I presume people in the US do too. How is that people in the US insist on things like saying their weight is 178 pounds or that item of equipment is 3,500 pounds? There are 14 pounds in a stone so that is 12 stone 10 and 2000 pounds in a "short" ton so that is 1.75 short tons. Why not drop larger units from distances and give all distances in furlongs then?

Water freezes at 0 and boils at 100. It's just simpler. With apropriate equipment and facilities, I can live between -50 and plus 50. I know the historical stories about the fallacies that 0F was the coldest you could get water and 100F was the temperature of the human body. Both of those are incorrect. If they were the only reason, there would be even less reason for people to use that I remember my parents explaining to my grandparents quite a few decades ago.

Using Celcius is probably the simplest change but it has the least pushing it as the sensible option.

I am 1.81 metres tall and a proper geeky 129 Kg. The weather is a balmy 22 degrees and the wind is only a couple of metres a second. I Have a litre sized water bottle on my desk. Those are pretty human sized units...

Comment: Missing Option (Score 1) 301 301

I don't have or want a laptop thanks.

I have a desktop PC, a tablet and a phone.
The Phone is for ultra portable, always connected and always on.
Tablet for meetings, away from office, work, home etc. Also for at home relaxed and so on.
The PC is when I want to actually do something other than look at things - you know like actually "creating content"

Whether you are writing a book, developing, photo editing or playing serious games, a full size keyboard and screen along with a comfy mouse will make you much less susceptible to eye strain, RSI and all sorts of other fun stuff.

There is a small number of things that need a laptop and nothing else but the use case is very small.
New desktop PCs come with anything from 5 to 10 USB sockets and a lot of monitors can increase the number by acting as a hub too.

Comment: They have them. (Score 1) 356 356

The BBC has got mobile pages. My phone and tablet keep going to them. Like in the XKCD cartoon, they are flawed.
There are some nice apps for it anyway. My favourite one comes with a nice widget too.

Wikipedia has several apps available for my phone. I suspect that there may be something available for users of iThings too.
because of that, there is no need for mobile pages because of a better alternative.

I suppose I knew that the EU would have had a website but I don't see what benefit a mobile version would bring.

On the whole, most mobile sites are annoying and incomplete in comparison to the "proper" one.
Sometimes the only thing I need is to be able to zoom in.

Conclusion: Mobile versions are not always needed.

Comment: Re:That confirms it (Score 1) 489 489

A single video confirmed all your biases?

No. My impressions have been formed by a lot of things, including previous news articles, books, talking to human beings and so on. This item has just convinced me that there has been enough "benefit of the doubt" given already.

Any biases I might have about the US are largely about your government, big business and misplaced notions of personal freedom. They are different.

Comment: Re:That confirms it (Score 1) 489 489

I

suggest you go read some crime statistics and maybe just open your eyes to the world. And if you just think its America I invite you to look at what the peaceful people of central africa are doing to each other.

Comparing your country, or here in the UK, against somewhere in Africa or the former Soviet empire is invalid.We both are supposed to have some sort of legal system. Both need work but we don't shoot our citizens so often. (I did not say never!).

Nobody said it is just the USA. It is just that the USA has less of an excuse than a country without the freedoms that we are supposed to have.

Beware the new TTY code!

Working...