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Comment: Give me the option to disregard... (Score 1) 188

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49501665) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Features Would You Like In a Search Engine?

...all meta shopping sites.
I'm at my wits end when alibaba or ali express or kelkoo or tengo or whatever is in the top five of EVERYTHING I search for. I don't ever want them to be even in the top 1000 unless I explicitly type "Meta shop" or whatever.

Apart from that one filter, just search for what I fucking asked for, not what you think I might have meant.

Comment: Re:boo hoo (Score 1) 161

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49369379) Attached to: Europol Chief Warns About Computer Encryption

Or, to put a different spin on what you said, is the money spent on counter-terrorism the most cost effective way of minimizing death of any kind? Could the spending be deployed in different endeavours that would outweigh the lives saved from terrorism? (Not that we have a lot of proof it saves any lives at all from terrorism).

Comment: Re:Some pedants are more pedantic than others... (Score 1) 667

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49267129) Attached to: Why There Is No Such Thing as 'Proper English'

Plenty of languages routinely use double negatives as ways of reinforcing the negative. English should be able to adapt to this too, without ambiguity. And in fact it does.
Find me a beleivable argument for interpreting "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more" as "I'm gonna keep on working on Maggie's farm".

Comment: Re:Stupid question (Score 1) 667

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49266995) Attached to: Why There Is No Such Thing as 'Proper English'

The English most of the world learns is called EFL. There is a profession called TOEFL, a subject called TEFL, translations intended for non-native speakers are often required to be in EFL.
EFL is neither EN_US nor EN_UK. It's "English as a foreign language". Listen to a teacher speaking EFL and you'll see what I mean.

Comment: Re:Some pedants are more pedantic than others... (Score 1) 667

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49266309) Attached to: Why There Is No Such Thing as 'Proper English'

The problem with the subjunctive in English is that although the mood clearly exists, only a very tiny number of verbs are capable of explicitly expressing it outside of the third person singular form. And since these days we don't use constructions like "I want that he come", even that form seldom gets used.

To most English speakers, therefore, the subjunctive exists only in the subconscious. They aren't linguists and they have better things to do. In such a context, "If I were" will quite justifiably go the way of the dodo.

Comment: Re:A Language With No Rules... (Score 1) 667

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49266035) Attached to: Why There Is No Such Thing as 'Proper English'

The GP did not say American English was wrong. He (or she) said Americans were lazy and uneducated. "Their", "there" and "they're" are identical both sides of the pond.
I'm not saying I agree with him because I see a lot of the same sloppy writing on UK-only forums.

By the way would you mind providing a link to the recordings of 17th century English you based your remarks on.

Comment: 87%, not 29% (Score 5, Informative) 384

by Godwin O'Hitler (#49187237) Attached to: French Nuclear Industry In Turmoil As Manufacturer Buckles

"The government of France, the world's most nuclear dependent country, has a 29% stake in Areva"

Not according to Areva it hasn't.
http://www.areva.com/EN/financ...

"Today, public sector holdings (CEA, the French state and CDC) of group capital has risen close to 87%. 4% of AREVA’s share capital is float."

The French have a peculiar way of privatizing stuff. It sort of looks like the companies are private, but the state still ultimately owns them. And all these "private" companies are acting like global players. The problem is whose money are they playing with?

Whoever dies with the most toys wins.

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