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Comment: Re: Narrow margins (Score 2) 326

by Glonoinha (#43822355) Attached to: Spain's New S-80 Class Submarines Sink, But Won't Float

Honestly I think you have it backwards.

Old school engineers doing it by hand had to know what they were doing.

Noobs with enough experience to 'look good' can have their deficiencies glossed over by the powerful CAD/CAM software, letting them build inconsequential assemblies that individually would work nicely in isolation, but fail as a whole because they didn't understand (or consider) the engineering and physics at the higher level.

Consider the difference between software engineering and programming. An average coder that knows his way around Eclipse can write a hand full of nice classes, but real software engineering by the heavy hitters can happen in a room without a computer - that's where you see the big picture.

Comment: Re:Manual econoboxes accelerate just fine (Score 1) 717

by Glonoinha (#41592775) Attached to: How We'll Get To 54.5 Mpg By 2025

but how often do you need to accelerate from a dead standstill to 60mph, as quickly as possible?

Eight or more times a day, each time I get onto the freeway in the middle of fast traffic. Merging into 70mph traffic when your can can only get to 42mph on the onramp and the odds of getting slammed from behind go up exponentially. Personally I like to be going about 10mph faster than the rest of traffic while I'm merging in, so I can ease off it a little to fit into the most appropriate gap in cars (at 70mph, most cars decelerate down to 55 or 60 a LOT faster than they can accelerate up to 80 or 85.)

Comment: Re:Who cares? (Score 2) 354

by Glonoinha (#40968275) Attached to: How Will Amazon, Barnes & Noble Survive the iPad Mini?

8G ipod touch = $200
16G ipad (2nd generation) = $400

My guess is that the ipad mini will split the difference and retail for $300. They may take the difference between the ipod touch ($200) and the ipad 3 ($500) and retail out the ipad mini at $350, but I'm thinking that the Google Nexus 7 retail price is going to pressure the price of the ipad mini to come in at $300.

Comment: Re:culture? (Score 4, Insightful) 239

by Glonoinha (#40501159) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Defines Good Developer Culture?

This.

Want some incredible results from your software engineers? Here's all the culture you need :
Give them a very quiet place to work, free from distractions, and take away the barriers to success / productivity.
- Too warm? That's a distraction that will destroy any attempts at getting work done that day.
- One or more people having personal discussions loud enough that the dev overhears them? Esp if the chatty people aren't on the dev team? Another day's productivity pissed away.
- It takes a good developer half an hour or so to 'get in the zone' doing heavy / hardcore coding and debugging. If he has to get up and go find food all those balls in the air drop to the ground and he starts over again when he finally gets back from eating. Find out what they eat and have it magically show up at their desk about 11:45am and they will feed their face while they continue being productive. If they're billable that extra hour, then there is nothing on Earth that you could feed them that costs more than that billable hour (but odds are they will be happy with a subway sandwich and a bag of chips.)
- Need to request permission / wait for a signature before doing something routine? Need to wait to have someone else make changes that the developer could make (perfect example : DDL or DML changes in the developer database)? Another day's productivity lost.
- Figure out who the slackers are and cull the herd a little. A small team of shit-hot developers that work well together can deliver rings around a larger team mixed with good / weak players.
- Any meetings that are useless? Don't make them attend. Any meeting with 8+ non-developers in it is probably useless, from the 'does a developer need to be here' perspective.
- Give the heavy hitters more hardware than you can imagine them possibly using - they'll find a way to put four monitors, two servers and two laptops to good use, and anything they don't use they will pass on to someone that can. Nothing says 'I love you' to a good developer than a new tech toy, or a new laptop when their old one is about two years old.

All that 'team-building' crap? Save it. Want a real team-building exercise, send a few of them away to a conference and only give them one car so they have to stick together, give them enough rope to get in trouble together. When they come back they will be an Olympic quality team.

Comment: Re:Partially Blocked View (Score 1) 378

by Glonoinha (#39741471) Attached to: The Laws of Physics Trump Traffic Laws

I couldn't believe it so I went searching. My research supports everything you said.
My previous post was incorrect. The funny thing is that everybody above was making fun of the Yaris' ability to stop at 1G, but based on what I'm finding that's pretty close to the truth. That also surprised me. Two in one day. Ouch.

Comment: Re:Common knowledge? (Score 2) 188

by Glonoinha (#39695077) Attached to: Documentation As a Bug-Finding Tool

I read this as 'When I don't know what I'm doing, I hack at it until I get something working and then I document what I did.' Fair enough. At that point you are documenting it at a fairly detailed level (hopefully). This happens when software development is done as 'Art'.
When software development is happening as 'Science', odds are you can at least outline your intent and design before you start coding the solution.

I've done both. Computer Science usually produces better results than Computer Art.

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