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Comment: Accuracy of the paper is suspect already... (Score 4, Informative) 132

by Glasswire (#49532053) Attached to: New Javascript Attack Lets Websites Spy On the CPU's Cache

I don't know what else they are wrong about but in the paper it says: "For example, the Intel Core i7-3720QM processor, which belongs
to the Haswell family, includes 8192 = 213 cache sets, each of which can hold 12 lines of 64 = 26 bytes each, giving a total cache size of 8192x12x64=6MB".
No, an i7-3xxx anything is in the Ivy Bridge not Haswell family but those cache characteristics would be correct for the Ivy Bridge i7-3720QM.
But if it was a Haswell it would be an i7-4xxx processor. So either they meant a last generation IVB processor or a different Haswell than they called out, but what they said is wrong.
Anyone see any other mistakes?

Comment: How this should have been prevented... (Score 1) 150

by Glasswire (#49500507) Attached to: Incorrectly Built SLS Welding Machine To Be Rebuilt

Even if NASA and ESAB had a "miscommunication" (I suspect an unresolved contract issue, which both sides thought the other has accepted responsibility for owning the floor contracting), what should have happened is that the ESAB equipment people, before starting work on the installation should have inspected the floor work they mandated to make sure it was done correctly. If this happened at all, you'd assume someone who notice that the floor has not been recently rebuilt AT ALL and would stop work until that got done. If you say your equipment needs some part of the environment to be a certain way before you can install, presumably you don't do it until it meets spec. So, no matter who else is to blame, ESAB is negligent in proceeding with work if the floor had not been brought in line with requirements.
An alternate, plausible chain of events is that NASA originally, disagreed with ESAB and felt the floor fix was unnecessary in the first place and told them if they wanted to do it, NASA was not going to pay for that. ESAB does a risk assessment, decides there's a danger but it likely will work and goes ahead. Install fails and during resolution, NASA makes under-the-table concessions to make ESAB whole financially if they admit it's their screw-up. This perfectly reflects the difference between govt and corporate fears. NASA fears looking stupid and is probably willing to pay money to avoid that. ESAB is more worried about losing money and can always subtly imply privately to other future customers that it was NASA that screwed up.

Comment: Bad move Ikea - should gone A4WP / Rezence (Score 1) 95

by Glasswire (#49161437) Attached to: Ikea Unveils Furniture That Charges Your Smartphone Wirelessly

A4WP and PMA have merged to form Rezence, which should become the prevailing standard as it's better technology than Qi. So it's really too bad that Ikea is supporting WPC - which will probably not emerge as the winning standard. Ikea can always make next year's furniture with Rezence, but it's not clear first gen customers that got Qi would be able to upgrade. Also the article is misleading in that it suggests Samsung is completely in the WPC camp when they are also involved with and helped found A4WP (Rezence) and believe it's the future.

Comment: A4WP and PMA are now both Rezence (Score 1) 1

by Glasswire (#49159895) Attached to: IKEA Unveils Furniture That Charges Your Smartphone Wirelessly

These two have merged to form Rezence, which should become the prevailing standard as it's better technology. So it's really too bad Ikea is supporting WPC/Qi what will probably not emerge as the winning standard. Ikea can always make next year's furniture with Rezence, but it's not clear first gen customers that got Qi would be able to upgrade. Also the article is misleading in that it suggests Samsung is completely in the WPC camp when they are also involved with A4WP and believe it's the future.

Comment: What's disturbing... (Score 2) 81

by Glasswire (#48725593) Attached to: FCC Says It Will Vote On Net Neutrality In February

... is that all the the commentary on the FCC vote seems to define net neutrality as not interfering with "web sites" from other parties (good, but... ) however, this is opening up a potential loophole where traffic to and from apps could be limited because they are not "web sites". We can only hope this is result of FCC trying to make their intentions more understandable to the public and that the actual proposal will be what it should be:
ISPs should not be able to prioritize/ deprioritize IP traffic to or from the ISP client hosts with other internet hosts not affiliated with the ISP .
This covers web site, app, OS, device and any other traffic. There probably should be an exception for traffic the client customer EXPRESSLY requests to be prioritized eg. VoIP or VPN to a particular hosts. Note that this all about the relationship with the consuming end-point, last-mile, customer. It should not impose any restriction on commercial connection, peering or other upstream contractual arrangements.

Comment: Just wait.... (Score 0) 117

"Microsoft seems to be correcting its hardware strategy, as well as its software one, with the Surface RT flop getting the axe... "
Just wait and see how unhappy the buyers of ARM-based plain Surface RT tablets are when they find out
a) They aren't getting any new updates or UI improvements
b) App vendors are shifting to Surface Pro x86 binaries
c) They can't upgrade to Windows 10
The difference between disposable consumer appliance items like phones/(most)tablets and Personal Computers is that PCs can be upgraded (or get lighter OSes put on them when they get old. PCs are general purpose tools which allow you to do things the original vendor may not have expected or even approve of. They are not a closed,static gadget.
(BTW, if there's no Surface, doesn't it seem funny to only have a Surface Pro?)

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