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Comment: Re:Any bigger PR nightmare? (Score 1) 322

by Genrou (#40287765) Attached to: Raunchy Dance Routine a PR Nightmare For Microsoft
In Brazil, there is a door manufacturer called "Fuck". This is their page, but they seemed to have changed their name by adding SA to the end (which, in Brazil, means a private limited company). They have nice door models -- every single one of them with women names -- Catarina, Cecilia, Polyanna, etc.. So, when you want to buy a door, you just ask to "Fuck Catarina", or something like that. I'm pretty sure it's intentional.

Comment: Re:Reminds Me... (Score 1) 130

by Genrou (#37289824) Attached to: Man Becomes Artist When He Sleeps

Reminds me of the excellent art book "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" - which talks about how we have to turn off some of the analytical features of our mind to become better artists.

I have this book. When I was trying to learn to draw, I used to read it every day. The author describes a kind of a "zen state of mind", where you lose your ability to think rationally and even talk. I spent a lot of time trying to achieve this state of mind. Never could. There are parts of this book that makes sense: the way you described, for example, that what we know about the world affects how we interpret what we see. But that magical state where you turn into a fantastic drawer, like the pictures shown in the book, I don't think make a lot of sense. In fact, today we know that you cannot dissociate left and right sides of the brain when interpreting or imagining images.

The book, however, helped me with the section that was called, I think, "letting the left side help", where the author describes how to measure and stablish proportions. Turns out, however, that this is not related to left or right side of the brain: any book on drawing I read later had the exact same techniques. I learned how to draw using them, and turns out that what you need is actually a lot of practice and knowledge. She presents a nice technique for copying pictures and nothing else. In the time I got more knowledge about sciences, all that book said sounded incredibly pseudo-scientific to me.

Comment: Re:The Solution is Simple... (Score 1) 154

by Genrou (#35940318) Attached to: Research Credibility In the Video Game Violence Debate

The main point in the article, is how almost none of the few published papers by the people signing to "video games don't cause violence" brief were published in respectable psychological journals.

The reasoning is flawed anyways: no matter how much people repeat something that is wrong, it doesn't become right. It just doesn't follow -- if the studies were all biased and badly conducted, no matter how many of them exist, their conclusions are wrong.

Following their reasoning: respectable (to astrologers) astrology journals have published much much more studies on the relevance of astrology than respectable psychologists published on video game violence. Thus, according to their arguments, astrology must be right. Same for every pseudoscience out there. And, here is one thing to think about: there is a lot of criticism on how research is conducted on psychology -- many people consider it borderline pseudoscientific.

Comment: Re:Characters (Score 1) 233

by Genrou (#35563872) Attached to: <em>The Hobbit</em> Finally Starts Shooting
This sucks. Don't get me wrong, I loved how they portrayed their respective characters in the LOTR movie (except, maybe, Elijah Wood couldn't convince me as Frodo, but, then again, he could never convince me as any character in any movie). What I wanted to see was some diversity -- different people with different acting, different characterization. When I was younger, I would like the unified choice, but these days, I think that difference in portrayals could only enhance the appreciation of both the movies and the books. Having the same actors and the same director is basically the same as having only one artist making illustrations of the book.

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

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