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Comment: Re:http://thepiratebay.org/search/Spore/0/99/0 (Score 1) 881

by Geno Z Heinlein (#24939271) Attached to: Will DRM Exterminate Spore?

Question the methods if you will, but I think people have figured out that organizing is the only way to get companies to listen.

There's a series of natural parallels here. Capitalists accumulate; workers unionize; consumers boycott. Sometimes I wonder if management hostility toward unions is partly motivated by the fact that management was countered by their own method: the accumulation of social resources. It makes sense that it would work for consumers as well.

Communications

AT&T Slaps Family With a $19,370 Cell Phone Bill 725

Posted by timothy
from the hearts-and-minds dept.
theodp writes "Mama, don't let your babies send e-mail and photos from Vancouver. A Portland family racked up nearly $20,000 in charges on their AT&T bill after their son headed north to Vancouver and used a laptop with an AirCard twenty-one times to send photos and e-mails back home. The family said they wished they would have received some kind of warning before receiving their chock-full-of-international-fees 200-page bill in the mail for $19,370. Guess they didn't read the fine print in that 'Stay connected whether you are traveling across town, the US, or the world' AT&T AirCard pitch. Hey, at least it wasn't $85,000."
United States

+ - The Top 25 inventions of 2007

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "Ever wonder where the next great idea will com from? Well, seems likely it could come from this group: The History Channel and Invent Now, a subsidiary of the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation, today named the Top 25 Inventions of 2007. These top 25 creators come from 17 states across the U.S. and their inventions cover a myriad categories, ranging from medical advancements such as a modular, information technology platform for motorized wheelchairs called the Gryphon Shield to environmental breakthroughs such as a green home powered by solar and geothermal energy. Other inventions include a shield designed to protect windows during hurricanes to a method that forces diesel engines to take in and re-use their own exhaust, reducing pollution. http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/1274 1"
Puzzle Games (Games)

+ - The "Godfather of Sudoku"

Submitted by
circletimessquare
circletimessquare writes "The New York Times profiles 55 year old Maki Kaji who runs Nikoli, in it's article "Inside Japan's Puzzle Palace. Nikoli is a puzzle publisher that prides itself on 'a kind of democratization of puzzle invention. The company itself does not actually create many new puzzles — an American invented an earlier version of sudoku, for example. Instead, Nikoli provides a forum for testing and perfecting them.' Also notable is how Mr. Kaji describes how he did not get the trademark for Sudoku in the United States before it was too late. But reminescent of a theme many Slashdotters will find familiar about intellectual property: 'In hindsight, though, he now thinks that oversight was a brilliant mistake. The fact that no one controlled sudoku's intellectual property rights let the game's popularity grow unfettered, Mr. Kaji says.' Will Nikoli be the source of the next big puzzle fad after Sudoku?"
Sci-Fi

+ - Star Trek's Omnipotent Q Is A Mac User

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "InformationWeek interviews John de Lancie, the actor who played the omnipotent Q, about science fiction influences on real-life technology. He says, in case of fire, the first thing he'd save is his Apple laptop. He also says the food and decor on Trek was terrible:

"I have to say, though, that I never saw them have a really good meal," he said laughing. "And I hated the colors. It all looked like a Holiday Inn. It looked like everyone was living in a hotel somewhere eating bad hotel food."
"
Software

+ - Spy satellites real time trackable

Submitted by
n2yo
n2yo writes "An interesting article has been posted on some Chinese web sites. Basically, the Japanese media reported that the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) are broadcasting some sensitive satellite tracking data including 2 Japanaese optical spy satellites. The article translated in English via Google can be seen here: http://translate.google.com/translate?sourceid=nav client&hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Frd.trafic.ro%2F%3Fu%3D war.163.com%252F07%252F0320%252F08%252F3A116HMM000 11232.html On other hand this AJAX based real time satellite tracking web site is very interesting too."
Nintendo

+ - DS Could Be Best Selling Video Game Platform Ever

Submitted by
njkid1
njkid1 writes "Nintendo's DS handheld has taken the industry by storm; that's no secret. In Japan the Nintendo portable has been out-shipping Sony's PSP on a nearly three-to-one basis. Moreover, in 2006 the DS almost single handedly elevated the Japanese video game market out of its previous doldrums. On this side of the Pacific, not only is the DS consistently outselling the PSP, but it often outsells all consoles. In February, the DS was once again No.1 with 485K units sold.http://biz.gamedaily.com/industry/feature/?id =15549&ncid=AOLGAM000500000000021"
Security

+ - Russian Trojan Powering Massive ID-Theft Ring

Submitted by
Buchanan's Toys
Buchanan's Toys writes "Researchers at SecureWorks have stumbled upon a massive identity theft ring using state-of-the-art Trojan code to steal confidential data from thousands of infected machines in the U.S. The Gozi Trojan, which connects to a server in Russia, has so far pilfered information from more than 5,200 home computers with 10,000 account records. The records retrieved included account numbers and passwords from clients of many of the top global banks and financial services companies (over 30 banks and credit unions were represented), the top US retailers, and the leading online retailers."
Printer

+ - Silverbrook's ultra-fast, low cost inkjet printer

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Silverbrook research has created a cheap and ultra fast inkjet printer with low running costs. Using a print head that spans the entire width of the paper Silverbrook's prototype A4 printer can deliver 60 pages per minute. Printing costs are $0.02pp for black text (presumably at 5% coverage) and $0.06pp for colour (at 20% coverage), due to the generous 50mL refill cartridges that will sell for less than $20. The introductory photo printing model will cost under $300 and print at 30ppm with a 100mm wide print head that delivers ink drops smaller than one picolitre. The nearest competition is from HP at $16,000/unit.

Full article and video at:
http://www.texyt.com/silverbrook+memjet+technology +available+desktop+photo+wideformat+hp+edgeline+co mparison

The photo printing model is due out by the end of the year."
Television

+ - DRM causes televison outage in Australia

Submitted by jebiester
jebiester (589234) writes "Tens of thousands of LG televisions arounds Australia are freezing during prime time shows such as CSI. It's now been revealed that the encryption of these shows, implemented to stop copying, is causing the problem. LG will now need to send technitians to the houses of many new LCD television owners to perform "A simple software upgrade"."
Quickies

+ - Kids test theory of relativity in a mini-van

Submitted by
Matthew Sparkes
Matthew Sparkes writes "Tom Van Baak and his three young children performed an impressive experiment on the theory of relativity. The group took a van equipped with 3 atomic clocks up Mount Rainier, near Seattle, for a couple of days camping. Because of the altitude, and therefore speed difference, they could calculate that there would be a time dilation of +22 nanoseconds between the two vans clocks, and some left at their house. If everyone's dad was like this then the world would be filled with theoretical physicists."
Media

+ - Sites That Aim to Be Hip End Up the Opposite

Submitted by
WSJdpatton
WSJdpatton writes "In his Portals column, WSJ's Lee Gomes says the savviest Web users doesn't always have a good record in predicting what the real world will take to, as some recent Web history suggests.
"One of the latest success stories among tech-oriented Web users is Digg, a news site that brags how readers, not editors, pick the stories. ... Tech bloggers typically genuflect before Digg, regarding it as a founder of a new kind of democratic journalism. As with any democracy, Diggers get what they deserve. Recent top stories have included a CNN report about a girl who found the severed head of her missing pet dog on her front porch, an interactive graphic featuring three women in halter tops at a car wash, and a posting about unusual urinals."
Programming

+ - John W. Backus, FORTRAN creator/developer dies.

Submitted by
dcowart
dcowart writes ""John W. Backus, who assembled and led the I.B.M. team that created Fortran, the first widely used programming language, which helped open the door to modern computing, died on Saturday at his home in Ashland, Ore. He was 82." Source: NY Times. I first read this on the Beowulf mailing list, where a lively discussion of programming in Fortran vs. C vs. C++ was in process..."
Linux Business

+ - Living (and dying) with Linux in the workplace

Submitted by
jcatcw
jcatcw writes "Sharon Machlis, Computerworld's online managing editor and new Linux guru, tried to switch to from Windows to Suse Desktop 10. From the article:

I expected to be a poster child for the next wave of Linux desktop adopters. I wanted to be. I like the whole idea of a technically macho, open-source operating system — one that doesn't assume we all must be protected from an operating system's inner workings. I don't fear command lines, and enjoy fiddling around with programming.

It turns out that an intermediate-level power user may not be the ideal next desktop Linux demographic.
"

For every bloke who makes his mark, there's half a dozen waiting to rub it out. -- Andy Capp

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