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Comment: Re:billing address checks? what checks? (Score 1) 172

by Gavrielkay (#47920525) Attached to: Quickflix Wants Netflix To Drop Australian VPN Users
Except Netflix is also bound by stupid rules and regulations. The entertainment industry is set up to milk every last penny they can, so I would assume that the contracts that Netflix has with Hollywood etc. don't allow them to offer all content to all regions even if Netflix wanted to. For Netflix' part, I'm sure the more subscribers they have, the more money they make and the better leverage they have in signing new content. I wouldn't think they'd go any further than absolutely necessary to prevent paying customers from accessing the service.

Comment: Re:doesn't sound like Netflix is the problem (Score 1) 172

by Gavrielkay (#47920441) Attached to: Quickflix Wants Netflix To Drop Australian VPN Users
Unless their product isn't so much "bad" as hampered by local regulations that Netflix isn't subject to. Lots of things are cheaper/easier/better when the provider skirts all the regulations heaped on the industry. I'm all for protective regulations, but where entertainment is concerned almost all the rules are more about being sure pockets get lined than making sure customers are protected. In my mind, Netflix isn't doing anything wrong. The Australians who are cheating the system rather than working hard to fix it are more the problem, though I don't really blame them.

Comment: Re:Idiots ... (Score 1) 172

by Gavrielkay (#47920027) Attached to: Quickflix Wants Netflix To Drop Australian VPN Users
It is similar to the problem that Uber is having with taxi services. The Australian providers and taxi services are subject to presumably expensive regulations. Due to this expense and other regulated limits on their services, they might be less attractive to users. However, it doesn't take much to understand why the people in those businesses stuck following the rules aren't happy when customers cheat and use unauthorized alternatives. The real answer is to investigate the regulations. Get rid of rules that only impair customer service and make sure the ones that protect customers/users are followed by everyone.

Netflix isn't cheating here. They have no reason to work hard to tell a VPN user from Australia from any other VPN user who just wants privacy. But the Australians who use Netflix rather than the local (hopefully) law abiding services are cheating. Quikflix is going after the wrong people.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 2) 770

by Gavrielkay (#47855597) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation
There does come a point when the resistance to the information goes beyond what is reasonable though. My personal opinion is that it doesn't even matter if the current warming trend is being caused by humans. The scary thing to me is the number of people who think that it can be safely ignored regardless. When growing regions and seasons change, when water availability changes, when coastal areas are flooded and tropical diseases migrate to previously temperate areas... well, there will be a lot of people wishing we'd put some money into mitigation plans.

The cause of global warming might matter somewhat to plans for things like carbon taxing and emission controls, but there is a separate larger issue of what to do to preserve our way of life even if it is caused by sun activity. No one will care whether it was man-made or cosmic rays when people in Wisconsin are dying of malaria.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 2) 770

by Gavrielkay (#47853885) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation
Just to be pedantic, scientific theories are quite strong and rarely disproven wholesale. Hypotheses on the other hand come and go pretty easily. What's funny to me is that people accept all sorts of science that suffers from the exact same problems that you write about... difficulty in reproducing, complex results that the layperson can't understand... but only those sciences that imply we might have to change our way of life get scolded. I'm pretty sure testing out femto-second lasers requires specialized gear that most people couldn't construct in their garage, but no one cares because they aren't asked to give up their gas-guzzling supercar because of lasers.

Comment: Re:Science creates understanding of a real world. (Score 1) 770

by Gavrielkay (#47853763) Attached to: How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation
You don't have to take the word of the consensus. What you should do however is not pretend that remaining ignorant of the science behind the consensus makes the science bad. Some things can be summarized for children and some things can't. Why should climate science - which is a complex blend of chemistry, physics and mathematics - be easily summarized? The studies are out there. Text books on climate and environmental science are out there. Do some leg work and figure it out.

Comment: Re:Could have fooled me (Score 1) 221

by Gavrielkay (#47821363) Attached to: Canada Tops List of Most Science-Literate Countries
Yeah, I've always thought this one was tricky. On the one hand you've got a man who never wanted to have a kid. On the other, a kid who'll still need taking care of. In a more socialized country where medical care and food for children would be more certain, I think it'd be easier to say the man should be able to get a court ruling during the pregnancy that he does not want to be involved at all. Giving up paternal rights and responsibilities legally and putting the decision on the woman whether to go through with the pregnancy or not should be an option... except in the U.S. with our health care and lack of a social net... do you really want to consign the child to a life of poor care?

Hard choices.

Comment: Re:Could have fooled me (Score 1) 221

by Gavrielkay (#47821331) Attached to: Canada Tops List of Most Science-Literate Countries
I agree to some extent. The problem is how easy it is to turn it into a he said/she said after the fact. The woman gets pregnant, asks if he'll help support the child. In a moment of weakness they decide to give it a go. Later he bails and claims he never wanted the kid. How do you tell that situation from the one where he said all along she'd better figure out how to do it without him because he wanted no part of it?

There is birth control that is plenty visible and controllable by the man. If he truly does not want a child and does not want to (or cannot) support one, then I'd suggest he bring a plentiful supply of condoms and spermicide to each and every liaison. Sure, it's not 100%, but it's better than hoping she's not lying when she says she's on the pill or whatever.

Comment: Re:Could have fooled me (Score 1) 221

by Gavrielkay (#47821305) Attached to: Canada Tops List of Most Science-Literate Countries
Having more social support should definitely help, but I was thinking of other issues as well. Such as the unmarried woman getting dirty looks from her co-workers when her pregnancy becomes obvious. Or mangers who won't hire the woman based on the assumption that she'll want lots of family leave to take care of a child. There are assumptions made about women/mothers that don't affect men - at least in the same way. I've heard stories about men getting promotions because they "have a family to support" as if the same weren't true of women. And in any case nothing trumps the fact that it is the woman's body. No law or man should be able to force her into or out of motherhood.

Comment: Re:Diet is very important. (Score 1) 588

by Gavrielkay (#47810689) Attached to: Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study
All of this research we're seeing lately indicates that as far as the likelihood of any given calorie being stored in the body as fat, they are not all alike regardless of what you might think. They aren't all alike in your body and they might be even more different in someone else's body. There is more to it than the number on the label.

Comment: Re:The diet is unimportant... (Score 1) 588

by Gavrielkay (#47810509) Attached to: Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study
It has been noted in weight loss circles for a while that losing weight is 80% diet and 20% exercise. Most people simply don't have the time or long term willpower to burn off lots of calories every day. You have to control your intake first to lose weight. Exercise for the extra calorie burn and for your overall health. There is no doubt that exercise is important for its own sake in keeping the cardiovascular system and the body in general as healthy as possible.

It is easy to point fingers at overweight people and think they are just lazy. The reality is that research is finding complexities in fat/protien/carb ratios, gut flora and insulin response are also important. You can feel holier-than-thou for resisting desert last night or jogging an extra mile, but you can't know how someone else would respond to the same diet and activity. There is simply more to it than "eat less, move more." Certainly "eat more, move less" isn't the answer, but most people will have to eat the right amount of the right foods in order to lose weight and be healthy. Exercise needs to be considered a necessary but separate topic.

"Let every man teach his son, teach his daughter, that labor is honorable." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

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