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+ - Male Scent May Be Compromising Biomedical Research->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Scientists have found that mice feel 36% less pain when a male researcher is in the room, versus a female researcher. The rodents are also less stressed out. The effect appears to be due to scent molecules that male mammals (including humans, dogs, and cats) have been emitting for eons. The finding could help explain why some labs have trouble replicating the results of others, and it could cause a reevaluation of decades of animal experiments: everything from the effectiveness of experimental drugs to the ability of monkeys to do math. Male odor could even influence human clinical trials. If a male doctor injects you with a new kind of pain medication, do you feel better because of the drug—or because of his gender?"
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+ - Astronomers Discover Pair of Black Holes in Inactive Galaxy

Submitted by William Robinson
William Robinson (875390) writes "The Astronomers at XMM-Newton have detected a pair of supermassive black holes at the center of an inactive galaxy. Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. And a pair of black holes is indication of strong possibility that the galaxies have merged. Finding black holes in quiescent galaxies is difficult because there are no gas clouds feeding the black holes, so the cores of these galaxies are truly dark. It can be only detected by this ‘tidal disruption event’,."

+ - The cosmic origin of gold (and other heavy elements)

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "Yeah, you might think you know where the elements come from. The lightest ones were formed from the Big Bang, heavier ones were formed in the cores of stars, and the true heavyweights of the periodic table were formed in the hearts of ultramassive stars during their deaths as Type II supernovae, right? As it turns out, that will get you all the elements in the periodic table, but not in the right amounts! For that, you need something more, and we owe it all to neutron stars!"

Comment: Meh, not this guy again. (Score 5, Informative) 292

Horgan has been going on about stuff like this for years. He wrote a book in 1997 called "The End of Science" which I read and thought was completely ridiculous. My recollection (possibly faulty as it's been quite a few years) is that he came across as very anti-science and wandered off into religion later in that book. It feels to me as though he WANTS science to fail at some point.

I don't know why he seems hell-bent on convincing everyone that we're going to run out of things to discover, but I just don't buy it.

Even if we manage to get to the "bottom" of Physics some day that's cool and all but it's hardly the end of much. The biology of even simple cells is fantastically complex and there's lifetimes worth of discovery left there. Also even if some day we we know most or all of the "rules", the possible applications of these simple rules are virtually infinite, so no scientists or technologists or explorers are likely to be unemployed any time soon.

Every time humanity thinks it knows everything, someone thinks up a clever new idea for measuring things and boom, a whole new world of complexity opens up. There might be an end to the turtles at some point, but I'm not worried :)

G.

+ - James Lovelock reflects on Gaia's legacy->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""A lot of investment in green technology has been a giant scam, if well intentioned."

The quote, and entire interview, are significant for two reasons. First, the interview is seeped with many skeptical opinions about human caused global warming, is very critical of that movement's effort to politicize science, and the person being interviewed is James Lovelock, the founder of of the concept of Gaia, a former strong advocate of global warming but now a skeptic.

Most significant however is where the interview is published. It is in Nature, one of the most important and influential science journals, which previously has been aggressively pushing global warming politics for years. That they allowed these politically incorrect opinions within their walls and then broadcast them to their readers signals a major cultural shift within the science community. It is beginning to be acceptable to be a skeptic again!"

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+ - Morse code test requirement to be reinstated for Amateur Radio License-> 1

Submitted by H0ek
H0ek (86256) writes "One of the standards of excellence required to possess an Amateur Radio License was to pass a test of Morse Code sending and receiving capabilities. At the beginning of 1991 this requirement was removed for Technician Class licenses, and finally in 2007 this requirement was removed for General and Amateur Extra Classes. This will now be reversed and all new applicants will be required to submit to the Morse Code test again. Also, all previous no-code licensees will have a specific length of time to renew their license with the new code test requirements. This can either been seen as restoring a badge of honor to the venerable amateur radio license system, or the death knell for a crotchety old system fading away in a world of community-wide wifi and mobile communications."
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+ - Minecraft cancels Oculus Rift released due to Facebook->

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "When Facebook bought Whatsapp a huge number of users migrated to much more open alternative Telegram and I was curious if we will see the same ‘Facebook’ effect on Oculus and that’s exactly what has happened. Minecraft has canceled their version for the virtual reality device as soon as they got the news of this acquisition. Markus Persson aka notch of Minecraft tweeted, “We were in talks about maybe bringing a version of Minecraft to Oculus. I just cancelled that deal. Facebook creeps me out.”"
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Comment: Re:How can they be certain no one survived? (Score 1) 491

by Gavin Scott (#46565645) Attached to: How Satellite Company Inmarsat Tracked Down MH370

Yes, that could be. But it seems clear that the plane was not being controlled by anyone who wanted the plane or its passengers to be rescued, so "oh, I've just flown the plane as far away from civilization as possible and I've just run out of fuel, yet I think I'll try at the last moment to make a successful water landing so as many people as possible can be saved" just does not seem likely. Either the plane was not under control, or those in control were not trying to save anyone.

And more specifically I strongly suspect the life-rafts were equipped with EPIRB satellite transmitters, none of which were activated. So that sort of suggests there aren't a bunch of people floating in a raft somewhere (which likely would have shown up during the satellite debris search I suspect).

Even having a rough idea of where it went down might still mean that the wreckage is not found for a long time. There's a lotta damn ocean out there, and I don't think the range of the "pingers" on the data recorders is that huge.

One thing I've been curious about is the cockpit voice recorder on the 777, specifically what the recording duration is (is it just a 30m circular buffer) and can the pilots disable it and/or the flight data recorder by pulling circuit breakers?

G.

Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself. -- A.H. Weiler

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