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Comment: Re:America (Score 1) 630

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#42378469) Attached to: Drawings of Weapons Led To New Jersey Student's Arrest

I used to hunt with a .303 rifle. Single shot bolt action, precise headspacing, accurate as anything and lots of stopping power. You wont get that from a gas operated system with an automatic bolt. If you really do need that fast a rate of fire then you are using a 223 for birds, and a shotgun is a much better bet...

Comment: Re:Great! (Score 1) 630

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#42378363) Attached to: Drawings of Weapons Led To New Jersey Student's Arrest

Sitting from the other side of the pond I wonder the same. We've slid down the same path in the UK and everyone is scared of terrorists, despite the fact we've had the IRA for 40 years, and they killed a lot more people over a lot longer time period than the current mob did.

I've never figured out why we stood up and gave the Irish the finger and refused to be cowed by them as much as they do with the current mob.

Comment: Re:OMFG Reagan was right? (Score 2) 861

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#42061993) Attached to: Israel's Iron Dome Missile Defense Shield Actually Works

You need to keep the neutron count down in a fissile mass being compressed, to prevent premature detonation and a resulting fizzle. (which is why weapons grade Pu keeps the 240 percentage small, to keep teh background neutron flux down.)

Now imagine tossing that warhead into an evironment just after a nuke has gone off. There is a lot of background neutrons from the fission products and fallout. If you implode the next warhead too soon it'll fizzle from this external increase in the neutron flux. Hence the need to seperate them in time to give the active decay products chance to also decay and get the neutron flux down,

Comment: Re:Do you trust your government? (Score 1) 374

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#41255675) Attached to: Dutch Police Ask 8000+ Citizens To Provide Their DNA

The British police did just that, except they lied from the start and said they were destroying the records. Several years later they had a huge illegal database, so got the law changed to make it legal.

IF the police want your DNA, do your level best not to give it them. Once given you won't get it back.

Comment: Re:Do you trust your government? (Score 1) 374

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#41255657) Attached to: Dutch Police Ask 8000+ Citizens To Provide Their DNA

Or the British way..

1. Ask for DNA samples to clear people from the investigation
2. Routinely sample DNA from people arrested.
3. Lie about keeping the samples.
4. Wait a few years
5. When get caught with a huge, illegally colelcted database whine it's useful and get the law changed so it's legal

Never trust the police. They have a binary few, Policeman, and guilty perps. If you are not a copper you are guilty, of something, and if not then we can find something.

Comment: Re:Using a phone in criminal activity? (Score 1) 145

The police could find someone standing over a dead body spattered in blood holding the hammer that fits the divot marks in the victims head, freely confessing to it and they would *still* be a suspect and no more.

They don't become a culprit, or rather a convict until the courts have had their say. Sadly there are too many coppers in the UK who think they are the law. They are the police - it's the magistrates and judges who are the law.

Comment: Re:Hack your phone (Score 1) 145

Since I never use my phone's data connection, and am so quaint that all I have on it is my phonebook there is mischeif to be had. Easily possible to build a 300V flyback converter inside the case of an extended battery, and use that to provide +/- 300V on alternate output pins on the data connector. I defy the machine to cope with that.

When asked I'll tell them it's a security feature, and knowing the woodentops if you tell them before it won't work that'll make them more determined than ever yo pulg it in and extract the data....at which point you've divulged your legal responsibility to warn them.

Comment: Re:So? (Score 1) 487

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#38990758) Attached to: Pasadena Police Encrypt, Deny Access To Police Radio

Sympathetic to whom? The police or the public?

Over here we have something called the Levenson enquiry into press standards and next up the entirely nasty world of the police tipping off and getting too cozy with the media. I'd much rather the two didn;t cooperate - we see enough perp-walks here already, but you never seem to see them when the police realise they made a mistake and quietly let them out the side door so the police don't get embarrassed.

Comment: Re:So? (Score 1) 487

by Gandalf_the_Beardy (#38990721) Attached to: Pasadena Police Encrypt, Deny Access To Police Radio

Wireless Telegrapy acts from 1949 on and the successive Communcations Acts have made the mere possession of devices for wireless telegraphy illegal unless you have a licence.

Some licences are held by the Govt on behalf of the people, like CB radio licences, and a broadcast receiver licence, others like amateur radio licences you have to get yourself after paying the fee/exams etc. There is no licence that you can get to allow you have communcations equipment for TETRA, unless you happen to be a licencend amateur and they are using some of the amateur allocations (as will happen for the Olympics)

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.

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