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+ - Thanks for the mammaries....->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "According to the TSA and international authorities the new body scanners freshly installed at an airport near you are supposed to have all images deleted after a scan, and are 'incapable' of retaining or printing. So here's a heartwarming story about a bollywood actor autographing a printout of his scan for friendly airport security staff who not only managed to retain his image, but print multiple copies."
Link to Original Source

+ - 210 million Facebook friends graphed by region->

Submitted by trybywrench
trybywrench (584843) writes "From the first paragraph of the article: "As I've been digging deeper into the data I've gathered on 210 million public Facebook profiles, I've been fascinated by some of the patterns that have emerged. My latest visualization shows the information by location, with connections drawn between places that share friends. For example, a lot of people in LA have friends in San Francisco, so there's a line between them.""
Link to Original Source
Intel

Intel Recruits TSMC To Produce Atom CPUs 109

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the plug-and-play-companies dept.
arcticstoat writes "Intel has surprised the industry by announcing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Taiwanese silicon chip maker TSMC to manufacture Atom CPUs. Although TSMC is already employed by AMD, Nvidia and VIA to make chips, it's not often you see Intel requiring the services of a third fabrication party. Under the MOU, Intel agrees to port its Atom CPU technology to TSMC, which includes Intel's processes, intellectual properties, libraries and design flows relating to the processor. This will effectively allow other customers of TSMC to easily build Atom-based products similarly to how they might use an ARM processor in their own designs. However, Intel says that it will still pick the specific market segments and products that TSMC will go after, which will include system-on-chip products, as well as netbooks, nettops and embedded platforms."
Image

Securing PHP Web Applications 229

Posted by samzenpus
from the protect-ya-neck dept.
Michael J. Ross writes "The owners and the developers of typical Web sites face a quandary, one often unrecognized and unstated: They generally want their sites' contents and functionality to be accessible to everyone on the Internet, yet the more they open those sites, the more vulnerable they can become to attackers of all sorts. In their latest book, Securing PHP Web Applications, Tricia and William Ballad argue that PHP is an inherently insecure language, and they attempt to arm PHP programmers with the knowledge and techniques for making the sites they develop as secure as possible, short of disconnecting them from the Internet." Keep reading for the rest of Michael's review.
Portables

New Netbook Offers Detachable Tablet 209

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the fun-new-toys dept.
Engadget is reporting that a new "Touch Book" being previewed at DEMO '09 in California by the company "Always Innovating" promises a new take on mobile computing devices. Touting 10 to 15 hours of battery life, this ARM-powered netbook weighs less than two pounds, but the true magic comes with the detachable screen that can function as a completely stand-alone touchscreen tablet. The machine is currently running a Linux OS with a touchable 3D UI, the entire screen is magnetic for mounting on a metal surface, and the whole package is being projected for less than $300.
The Courts

MD Appellate Ct. Sets "New Standard" For Anonymous Posting 260

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the or-you-could-just-clean-the-place-up dept.
A Maryland court of appeals has set what they are calling a new "standard that should be applied to balance the First Amendment right to anonymous speech on the Internet with the opportunity on the part of the object of that speech to seek judicial redress for alleged defamation." The court overturned an earlier ruling that would have required NewsZap.com to turn over the names of anonymous posters who posted negative remarks about the cleanliness of a Centreville Dunkin' Donuts. "In a defamation case involving anonymous speakers, the ruling said, courts should first require the plaintiff to try to notify the anonymous posters that they are the subject of a subpoena. That notification could come in the form of a message posted to the online forum in question, and the posters must be given sufficient time to respond. The plaintiff must then hand over the exact statements in question, so the court can decide whether the comments are obviously defamatory. Finally, the ruling says, the court must weigh the anonymous poster's right to free speech against the strength of the defamation case and the necessity of disclosing the poster's identity."
Government

Obama Stimulus Pours Millions Into Cyber Security 156

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the because-they-need-it dept.
nandemoari writes "As his administration continues to work on a stimulus plan that can save America's economy, Obama's latest course of action will see millions of dollars being allocated to heighten cyber security. The move will assist government officials in preventing future attacks on the United States. The President recently addressed his 2010 budget, outlining funding plans that will grant the Department of Homeland Security $355 million to secure the nation's most essential computer systems. The money will be spent on both government and private groups, with much of the funding going to the National Cyber Security Division and the Comprehensive National Cyber Security Initiative programs."

Comment: Re:5th Amendment (Score 5, Informative) 767

by Galphanore (#27006293) Attached to: US District Ct. Says Defendant Must Provide Decrypted Data
Watch this : http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4097602514885833865 You should never, ever, tell them anything you can avoid telling them. It can do you absolutely no good and even completely innocent things can be used against you. Sad, but it's what we've come to.
Software

Congress Endorses Open Source For Military 145

Posted by kdawson
from the because-it's-better-that's-why dept.
A draft defense authorizing act in Congress includes wording plugging open source software. It seems both cost and software security were considerations. This is an important victory for open source. "It's rare to see a concept as technical as open-source software in a federal funding bill. But the House's proposed National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (H.R. 5658) includes language that calls for military services to consider open-source software when procuring manned or unmanned aerial vehicles."
The Courts

Jack Thompson Disbarred 522

Posted by timothy
from the it-burns-it-burns dept.
Sockatume writes "The Florida Supreme Court has approved Judge Dava Tunis' recommendations for the permanent disbarment of John B. "Jack" Thompson, with no leave to reapply and $43,675.35 in disciplinary costs. The ruling is a step up from the enhanced disbarment that had been suggested by the prosecution, which would have forbidden him from reapplying for ten years. Thompson has 30 days to appeal the ruling before the disbarment is permanent. Thompson responds to the ruling."
Government

DOJ Opposes Extending DOJ Copyright Authority 141

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-our-problem dept.
I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "The White House has opposed the bipartisan bill that would create copyright cops on the grounds that it would cause the Department of Justice to end up 'serving as pro bono lawyers for private copyright holders.' And while they do occasionally prosecute criminal copyright infringement, they have no intention of dabbling with civil cases because, 'taxpayer-supported department lawyers would pursue lawsuits for copyright holders, with monetary recovery going to industry.' At this rate, the discovery of winged suiformes would appear to be imminent."

Comment: Re:Why (Score 1) 350

by Galphanore (#25144081) Attached to: Comcast Outlines New Broadband Policy
The, admittedly asinine, idea behind it is that people who only use the internet occasionally will be more apt to be upset when it is slower then they are expecting. Frankly, if I'm paying for a 6mb connection and I want to spend the weekend watching HD streaming movies I'm going to be very upset when my connection drops down to 1.5mb or, heavy forbid, 512kb. It really seems like Comcast is trying to alienate their customers as much as possible these days.

"There is hopeful symbolism in the fact that flags do not wave in a vacuum." --Arthur C. Clarke

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