Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:One Criterion Missing (Score 1) 165

by angel'o'sphere (#49617779) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

They don't prove any such thing.
Of course they have, I suggest to google.
All they prove is that a bunch of questionable researchers claimed to measure a marginally significant effect
Your way of wording this is: libel.
What you consider marginal is your thing, others might disagree.
, and have been hyping the fuck out of it.
They don't. If they would you would know the names of the scientists and you and we would see them in TV regularly.
There actually is no hype.
Scientific openness is not equivalent credulously accepting the claims of every whacko and charlatain who makes a claim, just because it "hasn't been disproven".
How do you come to the idea that this is happening here?

We do know things about the world. Nothing is absolute in science, but some things come very, very close. Conservation of momentum is one of those.
Yes, it is. And the drive conserves momentum quite fine. Why do you claim it does not, when all the theories about how it works clearly state: it does???

Comment: Re:Warp drive? (Score 1) 165

by angel'o'sphere (#49617731) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

BTW - cold fusion turned out to be a fraud, despite people clinging to the hope even today.

It did not turn out to be a fraud. It turned out to be a 'mistake', and that is even not sure as plenty of physicians are still or again working in that field.

Fraud is a word used in criminal contexts, it means a person is deliberately misleading other people to gain a profit, usually by causing damage to those people.

E.g. if I sell you at a metro station a ticket for 80 cents, which would normally cost 1,30 Euro ... you use the ticket and surprisingly it works, but as soon as a controller checks you, it turns out it is a children's ticket ... that is fraud.

Setting up a weird experiment and finding a strange effect and publishing everything about it: that is science. Even if it get debunked later.

Comment: Re:summary as i understand it: (Score 1) 165

by angel'o'sphere (#49617691) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

None of that sound scientific approach is present here, so the cold fusion "debacle" was handled right on the scientific side. This thing here is not and nothing of the published results deserves much trust at this time.

You are mistaken. Everything regarding how to build an EM drive is published.
I would start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E...

Comment: Re: Seriously ? What a non story (Score 1) 165

by angel'o'sphere (#49617619) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

The drive being suggested here does not use reaction mass at all, it pushes against space itself
No it does not.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E...

Scroll down to "Theory".

Even a propeller does not work by pushing against something and moving the boat/plane forward. It works by accelerating the medium around it and simply uses the momentum of that accelerated medium like a rocket uses its exhaust.

Comment: Re:Not just ineffective (EEO bullshit) (Score 1) 392

by Just Some Guy (#49615235) Attached to: Recruiters Use 'Digital Native' As Code For 'No Old Folks'

No fool like an old fool. But I am sure Sanjiv from Punjab is thankful for the push to outsource the job you were worried about.

That process works better for fungible young talent who might be plenty gifted but have no experience to set themselves apart from the pack. The best defense against seeing your job outsourced is becoming so good at it that you don't have much competition. The second best defense is becoming friends with the greybeards who are positioned to argue against the manager who wants to rightsize your job.

+ - The Programming Talent Myth

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: Jake Edge writes at LWN.net that there is a myth that programming skill is somehow distributed on a U-shaped curve and that people either "suck at programming" or that they "rock at programming", without leaving any room for those in between. Everyone is either an amazing programmer or "a worthless use of a seat" which doesn't make much sense. If you could measure programming ability somehow, its curve would look like the normal distribution. According to Edge this belief that programming ability fits into a bi-modal distribution is both "dangerous and a myth". "This myth sets up a world where you can only program if you are a rock star or a ninja. It is actively harmful in that is keeping people from learning programming, driving people out of programming, and it is preventing most of the growth and the improvement we'd like to see." If the only options are to be amazing or terrible, it leads people to believe they must be passionate about their career, that they must think about programming every waking moment of their life. If they take their eye off the ball even for a minute, they will slide right from amazing to terrible again leading people to be working crazy hours at work, to be constantly studying programming topics on their own time, and so on.

The truth is that programming isn't a passion or a talent, says Edge, it is just a bunch of skills that can be learned. Programming isn't even one thing, though people talk about it as if it were; it requires all sorts of skills and coding is just a small part of that. Things like design, communication, writing, and debugging are needed. If we embrace this idea that "it's cool to be okay at these skills"—that being average is fine—it will make programming less intimidating for newcomers. If the bar for success is set "at okay, rather than exceptional", the bar seems a lot easier to clear for those new to the community. According to Edge the tech industry is rife with sexism, racism, homophobia, and discrimination and although it is a multi-faceted problem, the talent myth is part of the problem. "In our industry, we recast the talent myth as "the myth of the brilliant asshole", says Jacob Kaplan-Moss. "This is the "10x programmer" who is so good at his job that people have to work with him even though his behavior is toxic. In reality, given the normal distribution, it's likely that these people aren't actually exceptional, but even if you grant that they are, how many developers does a 10x programmer have to drive away before it is a wash?"

Comment: Re:Price won't come down (Score 1) 288

by angel'o'sphere (#49612117) Attached to: Tesla's Household Battery: Costs, Prices, and Tradeoffs

Actually that aluminium battery is on the horizon.
A just a few weeks ago two youngsters in a school showcased such a thing, you should find it on youtube. It was btw. just two interested 14 - 15 year olds in an american public school doing experiments in a voluntary physics class/course.

China

Uber Office Raided By Police In China, Accused of Running 'Illegal' Car Business 164

Posted by timothy
from the didn't-ask-enough-permission dept.
albert555 writes: Uber's curse keeps on striking after Uber's office in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou was raided by authorities on the 30th of April 2015. Uber is accused of running an 'illegal' transport service, according to the Guangzhou Daily. Uber has been implanted in China since August 2013 and is suspected of not having the proper qualifications to run a private car business in the city. Following the recent German court ban two weeks ago, who will win the fight for private transportation? Long-term, established transportation companies with powerful lobbying arms or the newcomer making use of disruptive technology? Does Schumpeter's creative destruction also apply to the transportation sector?

+ - WikiLeaks' Anonymous Leak Submission System Is Back After Nearly Five Years->

Submitted by Sparrowvsrevolution
Sparrowvsrevolution writes: On Friday, WikiLeaks announced that it has finally relaunched a beta version of its leak submission system after a 4.5 year hiatus. That file-upload site, which once served as a central tool in WIkiLeaks' leak-collecting mission, runs on the anonymity software Tor to allow uploaders to share documents and tips while protecting their identity from any network eavesdropper, and even from WikiLeaks itself. In 2010 the original submission system went down amid infighting between WikiLeaks’ leaders and several of its disenchanted staffers, including several who left to create their own soon-to-fail project called OpenLeaks.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says that the new system, which was delayed by his legal troubles and the banking industry blockade against the group, is the final result of “four competing research projects" WikiLeaks launched in recent years. He adds that it has several less-visible submission systems in addition to the one it's now revealed. “Currently, we have one public-facing and several private-facing submission systems in operation, cryptographically, operationally and legally secured with national security sourcing in mind,” Assange writes.

Link to Original Source
Communications

WikiLeaks' Anonymous Leak Submission System Is Back After Nearly 5 Years 24

Posted by timothy
from the drop-'em-a-line dept.
Sparrowvsrevolution writes: On Friday, WikiLeaks announced that it has finally relaunched a beta version of its leak submission system after a 4.5 year hiatus. That file-upload site, which once served as a central tool in WIkiLeaks' leak-collecting mission, runs on the anonymity software Tor to allow uploaders to share documents and tips while protecting their identity from any network eavesdropper, and even from WikiLeaks itself. In 2010 the original submission system went down amid infighting between WikiLeaks' leaders and several of its disenchanted staffers, including several who left to create their own soon-to-fail project called OpenLeaks. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange says that the new system, which was delayed by his legal troubles and the banking industry blockade against the group, is the final result of "four competing research projects" WikiLeaks launched in recent years. He adds that it has several less-visible submission systems in addition to the one it's now revealed. "Currently, we have one public-facing and several private-facing submission systems in operation, cryptographically, operationally and legally secured with national security sourcing in mind," Assange writes.

The fancy is indeed no other than a mode of memory emancipated from the order of space and time. -- Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Working...