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Privacy

+ - Redefining Privacy in the Panopticon->

Submitted by
G0rAk
G0rAk writes "An interesting insight into how we are all colluding in building a Panopticon for ourselves and how Governments are late to the party. From the article:

Welcome to the Panopticon. Originally a concept created by a philosopher, Jeremy Bentham, in 1785 the Panopticon is a prison where every corner of the designated space is covered by a camera so prisoners feel that they are being watched all of the time and thus are more likely to behave.
Our problem is that the dividing line between what we consider private and public is getting increasingly fuzzy, we merrily publish great swathes of detail about our lives on blogs and increasingly on social networking sites.

"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:... And then a horrid memory came back (Score 1) 54

by G0rAk (#26545599) Attached to: The History of the <em>Ghostbusters</em> Game
That game totally got me into hacking at the tender age of 8! I *needed* to know how they made the computer shout "Ghostbusters!" when you caught a ghost and "He slimed me!" when you failed. A few months later I got a magazine with code that showed you how - sampling from the built in tape. The results were up to three seconds of shitty audio that would all but fill the 128kb of RAM.
Media

The Technology Behind the Magic Yellow Line 261

Posted by timothy
from the don't-eat-the-yellow-line dept.
CurtMonash writes "Fandome offers a fascinating video explaining how the first-down line on football broadcasts actually works. Evidently, theres a lot of processing both to calculate the exact location being photographed on the field — including optical sensors and two steps of encoding — and to draw a line in exactly the right place onscreen. For those who don't want to watch the whole video, highlights are here."

Comment: Snowball, hell (Score 1, Redundant) 648

by G0rAk (#26208523) Attached to: Psystar Claims Apple Forgot To Copyright Mac OS
That argument has surely got no chance of flying. The OSX splash screen says that Apple own the copyrights on the software as does the pretty box the disks come in and all you need to assert copyright ownership is a mark on the product that says so.

That restricting OSX to apple approved hardware is anti-competitive might have a chance but even with a little hat that first snowball ain't gonna last long.
Security

+ - McKinnon appeals to the Prime Minister->

Submitted by
G0rAk
G0rAk writes "In a last ditch effort to avoid extradition to the US, self confessed hacker Gary McKinnon's supporters have submitted an appeal direct to Prime Minister Gordon Brown asking that his trial be held in the UK and held vigils outside 10 Downing Street and the US Embassy. McKinnon's case has already been turned down by the House of Lords and the European Court of Human Rights says it can not help as we have previously discussed. This is the last throw of the dice for Gary as, according to his own site, a Judicial Review of the decision to extradite Gary to the USA is set for 20th January."
Link to Original Source
The Almighty Buck

Economic Crisis Will Eliminate Open Source 753

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the why-so-gloomy dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The economic crisis will ultimately eliminate open source projects and the 'Web 2.0 free economy,' says Andrew Keen, author of The Cult of the Amateur. Along with the economic downturn and record job loss, he says, we will see the elimination of projects including Wikipedia, CNN's iReport, and much of the blogosphere. Instead of users offering their services 'for free,' he says, we're about to see a 'sharp cultural shift in our attitude toward the economic value of our labor' and a rise of online media businesses that reward their contributors with cash. Companies that will survive, he says, include Hulu, iTunes, and Mahalo. 'The hungry and cold unemployed masses aren't going to continue giving away their intellectual labor on the Internet in the speculative hope that they might get some "back end" revenue,' says Keen."
Microsoft

Microsoft Calls Today Global Anti-Piracy Day 500

Posted by timothy
from the pirates-live-for-live-cd-distros dept.
arcticstoat points out an article at Custom PC, according to which: "Microsoft has announced that today is Global Anti-Piracy Day. Launching several global initiatives, the aim is to raise awareness of the damage to software innovation that Microsoft says is caused by piracy. ... As well as educating people about piracy, Microsoft has also initiated a huge list of legal proceedings that it's taking out against pirates. Microsoft isn't messing about when it says 'global' either. The list of 49 countries that Microsoft is targeting spans six continents, and ranges from the UK and the US all the way through to Chile, Egypt, Kuwait, Indonesia and China." Interestingly enough, unauthorized copies of Vista might not be harming the company all that much: reader twitter was among several to contribute links to a related story at Computer World which highlights Microsoft attorney Bonnie MacNaughton's acknowledgement that pirates prefer Windows XP over Vista and Office 2003 over 2007.
Transmeta

Transmeta Up For Sale 112

Posted by timothy
from the when-a-name-bespeaks-transition dept.
arcticstoat writes "After giving up on the CPU manufacturing business in 2005, low-power CPU designer Transmeta has announced that it's up for sale. In a statement, the processor company that brought us the mobile Crusoe and Efficeon series of CPUs said that it has 'initiated a process to seek a potential sale of the Company.' The announcement came straight after Transmeta reached a legal agreement with Intel over Transmeta's intellectual property and patents, which includes Intel making a one-off payment of $91.5 million US to Transmeta before the end of this month, as well as annual payments of $20 million US every year from 2009 through 2013."

Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of everything and the Wirth of nothing?

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