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+ - Code Combat: Free Opensource Multiplayer Programming Lessons.->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Looking for something todo this weekend?

Code Combat recently released the first of there multi player levels on the general public.
Enabling users to learn JavaScript it a fun game structured way. Tons of levels teach the basics of programming and JavaScript as users learn to code the AI sending humans against Orc's, from simple single player movement problems all the way to complex multiplayer Warcraft styled battles featuring multiple troop types and heroes.

Best of all. the entire project is up on Github (MIT license) and welcomes new submissions."

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+ - Java 8 Officially Released->

Submitted by darthcamaro
darthcamaro (735685) writes "Oracle today officially released Java 8, nearly two years after Java 7, and after much delay. The new release includes a number of critical new features including Lambda expressions and the new Nashorn JavaScript engine. Java 8 however is still missing at least critical piece that Java developers have been asking for, for years.

"It’s a pity that some of the features like Jigsaw were dropped as modularity, runtime dependencies and interoperability are still a huge problem in Java," James Donelan, vice president of engineering at MuleSoft said. "In fact this is the one area where I still think Java has a long way to go."

"

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+ - Moderate solar events could combine to make catastrophic space weather->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "On 23 July 2012, two eruptions on the sun known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) burst from an active patch of sunspots on the far side of the sun, which is monitored by a probe that circles the sun ahead of Earth in the same orbit. Emerging about 15 minutes apart, the CMEs quickly merged into one shock wave of charged particles that washed over the probe’s sensors just 18.6 hours later. Behind the shock wave, charged particles raced along at about 2250 kilometers per second—five times their normal speed at Earth’s distance from the sun—and the magnetic field strength there was more than 10 times that normally seen at Earth’s orbit. If pointed in our direction, such a combination would have produced the strongest geomagnetic storm to have struck Earth in history and could have knocked out satellites and earthbound power grids, researchers say. The observations of these CMEs will help scientists better model space weather and predict potentially calamitous solar storms."
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