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Comment: Re:Copyright trolls (Score 1) 512

by mcgrew (#48647563) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

I have no fear of copyright trolls; I register my books with the US Copyright office. If one fucks with me, I'll wind up with HIS money.

And since I'm my own publisher, I'm my own gatekeeper. You can find my books in bookstores world-wide, and I've posted them on the internet. Site stats say folks are reading them every day.

What I'm doing was impossible twenty years ago. Now that I'm retired I have the time to do it. When the subject of conversation actually comes to pass, everybody will be retired.

User Journal

Journal: A mild rant 1

Journal by mcgrew

I've been listening to KSHE since the day they changed format in 1967. They play some great rock and roll.

They're a hundred miles away; Im in the fringe reception area so I listen online. So a few days ago I'm editing random Scribblings and the music stops. I curse Firefox and Flash and ComCast and pull the browser up to refresh the page that plays the music, and I see "Still listening?"

Comment: Re:Established science CANNOT BE QUESTIONED! (Score 1) 633

by khallow (#48647151) Attached to: Skeptics Would Like Media To Stop Calling Science Deniers 'Skeptics'

To move forward, you'll need to fund a blinded RCT of a measles vaccine.

And as I already noted, absence of rigor is not proof something is wrong. Your p=0.05 standard is rather weak too. Even from a frequentist (holding to certain "large data" statistical assumptions) viewpoint, that's still a large 1 in 20 chance of being wrong. Empiricism can't deal in absolute certainty. Sure, you might be right.

But I find it interesting that what you use as evidence is also evidence of the great drop in prevalence of measles. After all, measles doesn't suddenly stop becoming highly infectious just because people don't try to be deliberately infected as children. We should be seeing most adults infected by measles, if they don't have some sort of immunity (it's been a while since the measles vaccine was introduced). Similarly, doctors don't suddenly start misdiagnosing measles just because there is a vaccine out there. These changes indicate a sudden large drop in the infectiousness of measles which can be readily explained by the widespread use of the measles vaccine (which according to Wikipedia was first available in 1963 and became part of the MMR vaccine package in 1971). Where's the vast number of infections of people under the age of 40 in the developed world?

Comment: Re:Wrong way of thinking. (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48647087) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

History has shown that the freer the market is, the faster it gets overtaken by monopolies.

Then you should be able to provide examples. Be warned, I will show how your reasoning is flawed as you do so.

Once the monopolies are established, they use their economic means to ensure that the market is anything *but* free.

Established? How? Already we have a non-free market mechanism in the works via your "locking" mechanism.

Bear in mind that I also am not concerned by temporary monopolies. They create pricing signals that lure in new competition.

Comment: Re:Wrong way of thinking. (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48647067) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

The problem with your unregulated utopia is that psychopaths exist who would quickly corrupt it and turn it to their own benefit. Human nature will ruin any attempt at a pure "free" market. We've already seen the effects of businesses being able to do whatever they want in the pursuit of profit. The Cuyahoga river caught on fire 13 times.

That's only a problem if you don't anticipate it. How are those psychopaths going to stay employed? How are those psychopaths going to get people to work for them?
br. As to regulation, I don't rule it out. Sure, we need some environmental regulation.

Comment: Re:Wrong way of thinking. (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48647049) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?
That's a pretty dumb argument since it leaves the opinion of what a threshold of "poison" is to one side of such a conflict. "They" might rather not be poisoned at all, but that's not a right especially with toxins that are normally present in the environment, sometimes in high concentrations.

One of the real world arguments against the EPA is that it frequently establishes levels of toxins which are far lower sometimes by orders of magnitude than what are required to poison you, sometimes considerably lower than the natural levels of the toxin. And that it does so in a way that frequently ignores cost of compliance.

The EPA also has a variety of tools at its disposal which violate basic constitutional principles (ex post facto laws such as Superfund, punishment without being charged for a crime via wetland regulations, etc).

Comment: Re:Yet another clueless story on automation (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48646959) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

The question is not who employes them, the question is who pays for their living expenses. If companies don't pay a living wage, then that's you and me.

So what? We already made that choice to do so. Forcing companies to go with automation over employment doesn't make this situation any better.

Comment: Re:Yet another clueless story on automation (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48646915) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

Government money should only got to things *I* like!

I don't mind government money not going to things *I* like as long as society doesn't suffer greatly by elimination of important services. But I do mind government money going to things I despise. That's pretty much most of US federal government level spending right now.

Welfare need not be something I despise, but advocates just don't get the point of it. The point of welfare is not to provide stuff that we can get for ourselves, should we care enough (pensions and health care being notorious examples), it's not to create subsidies, rent seekers, grotesque inflation of the cost of vital services (health care and education being great examples of that), anti-social behavior that we then must stamp out with more government spending (such as the crackdown on student loan defaults in the US or those mean corporations that pay near minimum wage), and it's not a massive behavior modification sand box for somebody's entertainment. It should just be relative small amounts of spending for people genuinely down on their luck or suffering in a way that can be greatly alleviated with a little money. I recognize that even my small amount of welfare will have unpleasant and unintended consequences. But at least it'll be small enough that it doesn't obsessively drive social policy, class/ethnic conflict, or endless streams of government regulation.

Comment: Re:Oh, no. You have this REALLY wrong. (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48646873) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?
As an aside, note that the "base income" advocates on Slashdot all state that one of the prime purposes of the base income approach is to reduce the desperation of workers. That sounds to me a lot like being able to command a higher wage, for those who choose to work. While food stamps and other such welfare programs aren't a plug-in replacement for the base income, they're close enough that they should have similar effects.

Comment: Re:Oh, no. You have this REALLY wrong. (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48646857) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

Of course they're benefiting from government assistance. When employees cannot survive on low wages, the government makes up the difference, thereby providing business with the continuing ability to pay lower than adequate wages. No health care? Government. Not enough food? Government. Can't pay the rent? Rent assistance. Not enough for day care? Childcare assistance.

Then you ought to be able to come up with support for your assertion. This current argument is just the fallacy of argument from obviousness. It is not obvious, else we wouldn't have this argument in the first place. Keep in mind that you haven't shown even step one, that Walmart's labor costs are lower because people have benefits.

It's a shell game: hiding the actual costs of producing and serving and supplying goods (eg pizza, walmart's merchandise) behind a curtain of indirect government support.,

But let's suppose you're right for a moment. This is your shell game. These are companies responding to the incentives you put in place. This is your supposed problem that you created. You have two choices as I see it: eliminate the welfare that leads to these alleged subsidies or suck it up.

I think this is the most obnoxious part of the welfare state. The tool that created the unintended consequence gets used again and again, creating more and more unintended consequences as it goes. There never is any learning from failure by the masters of the tool of welfare. It's always the fault of all those counterrevolutionaries/greedy corporations/Tea Baggers/whatever who don't behave the way they're supposed to behave.

Comment: Re:Yet another clueless story on automation (Score 1) 512

by khallow (#48646767) Attached to: What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?
How does the current approach in the developed world do anything to avoid "angry mobs"? I keep pointing out the obvious. This problem of unemployable people is a first world problem. It's not a developing world problem which has somehow figured out how to keep those people employable.

You're already carrying the sphere!

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