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Comment: Re:Spare Change (Score 3, Insightful) 297

100 percent. Been there, done that.

There are four basic types of "homeless" -

1. The mentally ill.
2. Drug users and alcoholics that don't want to "get off the street" enough to do something about their habits.
3. Homeless people who lived too close to the edge and became unemployed, drug addicts and alcoholics who want to change their lives.

And here is Seattle - "Nicklesville" ...

4. People who feel that society should support their homeless lifestyle.

There are in fact many services for all of these groups except Number Four. The rest, if they work hard, give up the heavy booze and drugs (there are in fact programs), they can lift themselves out of homelessness.

And don't fool yourself, Number Four exists in great numbers, dragging the "real" homeless down to their level.

Comment: Re:How much titanium (Score 1) 152

by Frosty Piss (#46716299) Attached to: Under the Chassis: A Look At Tesla's Battery Shield

is there in one of these plates? Are they detachable by thieves to be sold for the metal value?

Given the location and structural requirements, I'm going to say this is not a readily detachable part...

Don't underestimate the persistence of a meth-head: Catalytic converters are removed with battery driven grinders and saws-alls all the time.

Comment: Re:In other news... (Score 1) 477

by Frosty Piss (#46715267) Attached to: New French Law Prohibits After-Hours Work Emails

France fails at having an Internationally competitive workforce.

Sure, if you are a fan of the coporate greed that is "free trade". On the other hand, if your primary goal is the health of your society, your nation, your people and their quality of life, an "internationally competitive workforce" may not be the top concern on your list.

+ - Snowden's purloined documents are now available online->

Submitted by Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss (770223) writes "The ACLU and others have long suspected that the National Security Agency has gone far beyond its mandate of gathering information for counter-terrorism and foreign intelligence purposes. Many Those suspicions were confirmed when, on June 5, 2013, The Guardian released the first in a series of documents provided by Edward Snowden detailing the NSA's unlawful spying activities. All of the documents released since that day, both by the media and the government, are housed in a database maintained by the ACLU and accessible by the public on-line."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Hell no... (Score 4, Informative) 319

by Frosty Piss (#46690197) Attached to: SF Evictions Surging From Crackdown On Airbnb Rentals

The landlords have nothing to do with this. This is the city evicting people.

Incorrect.

The city is threatening landlords with fine for the activities of their renters. The landlords are evicting people, not the city.

You should also read this article analyzing the issue from an owner's perspective. You'll note that it doesn't suggest that the San Francisco has the ability to evict the tenant... merely to fine the landlord.

The landlords evict to avoid the fine, and also because the renter has clearly violated the rental agreement.

Comment: Hell no... (Score 5, Interesting) 319

by Frosty Piss (#46688091) Attached to: SF Evictions Surging From Crackdown On Airbnb Rentals

the context here is that rental rates in SF have skyrocketed in recent years, and if landlords can evict long-time tenants they can get the unit on the market for 4x rent.

Irrelevant. You expect your landlord to uphold his end of the lease, why should he not expect you to uphold your end of lease.

This sounds like predatory landlord practices.

It sounds to me like landlords enforcing the rental agreement. The agreement is between the renter and the landlord, not some unknown unvetted third party.

I'm not sure I want to live in a building where other renters are sub renting to random people on a daily basis. Seriously, these people need to get a hotel room, and if they can't afford a hotel room, well, what could go wrong?

+ - Pentagon bracing for public dissent over climate and energy shocks->

Submitted by Frosty Piss
Frosty Piss (770223) writes "Since the 2008 economic crash, security agencies have increased domestic spying on behalf of corporate interests. This activity is linked to the last decade of US defence planning, which has been increasingly concerned by the risk of civil unrest at home triggered by catastrophic events linked to climate change, energy shocks or economic crisis. Just last month, unilateral changes to US military laws formally granted the Pentagon extraordinary powers to intervene in a domestic emergency or civil disturbance — 'Federal military commanders have the authority, in extraordinary emergency circumstances where prior authorization by the President is impossible and duly constituted local authorities are unable to control the situation, to engage temporarily in activities that are necessary to quell large-scale, unexpected civil disturbances.' The public is being increasingly viewed by the Pentagon as potential enemies that must be policed by the state."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Quick!! (Score 1) 77

by Frosty Piss (#46680089) Attached to: 3D-Printed UAV Can Go From Atoms to Airborne in 24 Hours

Quick!!! A 3D printer can print something! This is newsworthy fodder for Slashdot!!

And naturally the thing being created is currently very "sexy" in the tech world - a UAV! Why, the uses are unlimited! Amazon can deliver products to the products (you and I), and, and, and...

I think there are many great possibilities for 3D printing beyond the UAV / plastic gun craze, though.

When all else fails, read the instructions.

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