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Comment: Re:Apple assholes (Score 1) 383

by FromFrom (#44241617) Attached to: Judge Rules Apple Colluded With Publishers to Fix Ebook Prices

but it didn't raise the prices of e-books the publishers were selling

the customer pays a little more

The post you are reacting to is talking about publisher price. You/the SJ quote is talking about customer price.

I have to question the accuracy and bias of your post.

Don't get fooled by your own bias...

Comment: Re:P0WN3D! (Score 1) 349

by FromFrom (#38345110) Attached to: German Court Issues Injunction Against iPhone & iPad

I think you miss the point. His post seems to be about moderating that is incorrect these days.

He might be 'off topic' but he is not 'flamebait' as he is currently moderated. His complaint therefor seems proofed by the moderation of his post.

There is not much discussion possible if people moderate everybody down with another opinion.

Comment: Re:why? (Score 1) 580

by 0ld_d0g (#30569700) Attached to: Chinese Pirates Launch Ubuntu That Looks Like XP

I can give you a thousand viruses and worms I'm immune to.

That is a nice FUD to cover for the fact that Linux doesn't run windows executables. Or are you telling me Linux can detect before hand if an executable is going to cause harm?

How to exploit linux remotely? troll full_disclosure or milw0rm till someome finds a remote vuln and posts sample code. or find one yourself.

How to exploit linux using a drive-by exploit? do the same thing, but look for browser exploits.

(replace linux with any other OS and it still works)

Comment: Re:This has been an issue for quite awhile. (Score 2, Interesting) 420

by Bert64 (#30569674) Attached to: Consumerist Says AT&T Site Won't Sell iPhone In NYC, Citing Network

Yeah, i got stung by an automated anti-fraud system when i tried to book a flight ticket (relatively large purchase), had to call up the card provider and explain that i really did want to go there..
Then when i arrived, my card again got suspended because i was using it out of my normal country, in the place i had just bought a ticket to and told them all about it. I then had to pay exorbitant phone charges to call them and explain again.

Comment: Re:The inevitable Slashdot response... (Score 1) 149

by Rick17JJ (#30569566) Attached to: What's Happened In Mobile Over the Past 10 Years
I only make about one call per week with my cell phone and do not use it enough to even remember how to adjust the volume. All I want is a cell phone to make calls. Any unnecessary complexity just gets in the way of my remembering how to just make a call or adjust the volume.

I have memorized the several of my most commonly used phone numbers, which saves me from needing to know how to look up a telephone number in the cell phone. I keep a few other less commonly used telephone numbers on a card in my wallet.

I usually do not bring my reading glasses along when hiking or working outside, so I am then unable to see the menus or labels on the buttons. So when I forget which button does what, I have difficulty using the phone. As for the alternative of using voice activated commands when outdoors, I do not use the cell phone enough to ever remember how to use that feature either.

Despite being somewhat of a Luddite about some technology, I have built several of my own desktop computers for use at home over the years, and installed Linux on each of them. I even prefer to do many ordinary tasks such as moving files from the command line instead of using the built-in point-and-click GUI alternatives. But, I was once told by a computer expert, that Linux is too difficult for the average computer user. I have never managed to learn how to properly operate my cell phone, but I have had no building a computer and installing and using Linux. I also managed to easily setup my DSL modem and its firewall, even though the installation CD was not designed to run under Linux. But, using an ordinary cell phone is a much more difficult task which is too complicated for me.

By the way, all that advertising on TV about the minutes used in a plan, is as irrelevant to me as extra cell phone features, since I only use a total of several minutes per month. Cell phone are not designed or marketed towards customers like me.

Comment: I actually looked (Score 1) 580

by Andtalath (#30569372) Attached to: Chinese Pirates Launch Ubuntu That Looks Like XP

At the screenshots.

It was an XP theme with a taskbar at the bottom and.
That's not impressive, they hadn't worked out the icons to look the same for instance.

So, well, not impressed.
But, yeah, sure, grandma and grandpa won't notice that it's not windows until they try to do anything out of the ordinary.

Also, it's never good enough to be almost as good, not even good enough to be as good.
You have to be better.
Therefore, this is a typically bad idea for linux in general, especially since it tells us "We can't do better than microsofts almost decade old OS".

Comment: Re:This has been an issue for quite awhile. (Score 1) 420

by ihavnoid (#30569360) Attached to: Consumerist Says AT&T Site Won't Sell iPhone In NYC, Citing Network

The Korean on-line banking was starting to be implemented something like 12 years ago. Back then when Netscape was the dominant web browser, IE was something like 5.x, and there was no serious open-source alternative. Pretty much all the users were using either IE or netscape, so they couldn't force them to use some kind of in-house browser, nor afford to develop a new browser.

There once was a period that Netscape was supported, but no banks support it anymore because Netscape's market share turned to something close to zero.

I agree that the situation is pretty crazy because nowdays banks install mandatory 'keyboard protection' and 'anti-virus' plugins sort of stuff, which installs malware-like keyboard sniffing, system-crippling device drivers. Many people gets disgusted by this situation, but I sort of understand that the banks had no choice.
If somebody loses money even due to some client-side rootkit (such as keylogging), they still have the risk to be liable, and the court usually rules in favor of the victims.

The Korean on-line banking system is actually much more than merely SSL - every user has their own RSA certificate, their own passphrases, which expires every year. Signatures of the transactions are made on the client-side. Thus, simply having the password isn't enough to make a transactions - you need the certificate, the passphrase of the certificate, the password of the bank account, and finally, the password for logging in to the bank's website.

Riches: A gift from Heaven signifying, "This is my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased." -- John D. Rockefeller, (slander by Ambrose Bierce)

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