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Comment: Re:What I would like to see (Score 1) 176

by Francofille (#36506204) Attached to: Amazon Tests a Home-Delivery Service For Groceries

Purchasing things in bulk is actually the answer to your quandry - it's just that you need more consumers splitting the quantity. Many grocery stores have bulk spices where you can purchase exactly what you need in a small baggy. But you have to go there and decide how much you want and spoon it in yourself.

In Europe people buy what they intend to eat for the day and as a result they always have fresh foods. Daily or almost visits to the bakery, the butcher, the produce stand, the fromagerie, etc.

It's a beautiful way to live, really. And completely sustainable within parameters (you have to live within some measure of civilization, you have to decide how far you're willing to travel for a quantity and price that satisfy you). They've been doing it for centuries. A bakery that is well patronized on a daily basis does not need to charge $2.99 for a baguette to stay afloat. They charge reasonable prices, people patronize them regularly and the cycle supports itself.

I'm not sure what your post has to do with delivery though. What you want gets less and less feasible as you add more transaction costs like even more packaging and even more transportation.

Comment: Re:ignoring other uses? (Score 1) 86

by Francofille (#36505708) Attached to: Turning Memories On/Off With the Flip of a Switch

I am not saying that we should not develop it,

It's all about funding. When you say "we", the underlying implication is that someone will pay for this research and development. The medical condition charities and drug company conglomerates have deep pockets and vast future potential earning. Also when people tighten their belts and make personal budget cuts, healthcare is often not an optional expense.

NASA was one R&D driver that wasn't related to medical conditions. Whether or not it was worth the price, a lot of technology came out of all that work.

Comment: basic quality assurance professionals (Score 1) 371

by Francofille (#36443534) Attached to: How Citigroup Hackers Easily Gained Access

Please remember this story next time your boss thinks it's okay to hire or use just anyone to do QA. PMs and Customer Service agents are not testers! Nor can you do effective testing with only kids straight out of school.

Imagine if buildings got built with no architects, no engineers, just construction workers. Or no construction workers, just engineers. Would you feel safe on the top floor?

Comment: gridlock in key intersections (Score 1) 367

by Francofille (#36430304) Attached to: Los Angeles To Turn Off Traffic-Light Cameras
Don't know about L.A. but in Seattle there are plenty of key intersections that people are constantly blocking. Pulling out into the intersection when there's no room for them to make it out, then sitting in the intersection during the other direction's whole green light blocking the way. It accomplishes nothing, gets them no further, and only makes traffic worse for everyone. I haven't seen any way to get people to stop mindlessly gridlocking these bottlenecks except by holding them accountable for it, and cameras do just that. I hate cameras and violation of privacy, but when people consistently don't follow the rules (and they're not so hard to follow, not so hard to understand, and not such a sacrifice here), it's one way to solve the problem.
Apple

+ - 2 dead, 16 injured at iPad factory->

Submitted by Ykant
Ykant (318168) writes "The Register (and other news sources) are reporting that 16 people were injured and two killed after an explosion at the Foxconn plant near Chengdu.

The plant is a manufacturing location for the iPad2, and is also believed to be a fabrication facility for the next iPhone.

Footage of the factory and evacuation is available as well."

Link to Original Source
Medicine

+ - Physics Professors Say TSA Rigged X Ray Tests-> 2

Submitted by Jeremiah Cornelius
Jeremiah Cornelius (137) writes "A letter signed by five professors from the University of California, San Francisco and Arizona State University challenge claims made for the safety of the backscatter X Ray scanners, in use by TSA: "The document is heavily redacted with red stamps over the words and figures. In every case the electric current used which correlates one to one with X-ray dose has been specifically redacted. Thus there is no way to repeat any of these measurements... In fact the JHU APL personnel, ..were not provided with a machine by Rapiscan. Instead they were invited to the manufacturing site to observe a mock-up of components (spare parts) that were said to be similar to those that are parts of the Rapiscan system.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Scare tactic (Score 1) 580

by Francofille (#35520706) Attached to: US Alarmed Over Japan's Nuclear Crisis

It's an interesting contrast to the message we attempted to send the world about our spewing millions of barrels of oil into the ocean for months on end.

Not to worry, it's hardly anything, a few barrels here and there, we'll have it fixed in a jiffy, move along nothing to see here ... ah look we poured more chemicals in for a couple of days and now it's good as new .. Good. As. New. Yep!

Comment: Re:Which is ridiculous..... (Score 2) 316

by Francofille (#35306784) Attached to: Study Calls Craigslist 'a Cesspool of Crime'

Our parents taught us to be wary of bad neighborhoods, parks at night, strangers with candy, men in vans offering rides, to look both ways before crossing the street, to use a condom (well, we learned that somewhere anyhow), to wear our seatbelts, etc, etc...

They didn't teach us to be afraid of classifieds. Well some people seem to indicate that, but honestly that sounds like a bad movie to me. I may be naive and everyone who grew up around me may also be naive, but that's not really a sin or a personality flaw. It's just a little dangerous under the wrong circumstances. When you mix it with a crime-ridden forum that seems innocuous you turn innocent people into suckers really fast. Which is just sad and unfair.

I think the real issue is that we run in circles where we're comfortable and understand how to keep ourselves safe. Craigslist helps us step out of those circles very fast without realizing it until it's too late.

Comment: Re:So did she name names or did the truth just hur (Score 1) 634

by Francofille (#35181638) Attached to: Teacher Suspended Over Blog About Students

People have just never understood satire very well. It's too sophisticated and you get more attention if you get pissed and shout louder than the next guy.

This poor teacher could have posted that they should serve Irish babies for lunch in the cafeteria and the parents would've been just as UP IN ARMS and clamoring for her head.

Space

JAXA To Use Fishing Nets To Scoop Up Space Junk 210

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sounds-like-a-super-hero dept.
An anonymous reader writes "We've seen high-fallutin proposals to tackling the space junk problem before — and now the Japanese space agency JAXA has teamed up with Japanese fishing net maker Nitto Seimo to haul in some of the 100,000-plus objects of space junk orbiting the planet. AJAXA satellite will deploy and release a kilometers-wide net made by Nitto Seimo of ultra-thin triple layered metal threads. The net will gradually be drawn into Earth's magnetic field and burned up along with the abandoned satellites, engine parts and other litter it's collected."
Programming

Should Younger Developers Be Paid More? 785

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the you-deserve-a-raise dept.
jammag writes "A project manager describes facing an upset senior developer who learned that a new hire — a fresh college grad — would be making 30 percent more than him. The reason: the new grad knew a hot emerging technology that a client wanted. Yes, the senior coder was majorly pissed off. But with the constant upheaval in new technology, this situation is almost unavoidable — or is it? And at any rate, is it fair?"

Comment: Re:What really concerns me (Score 2) 475

by Francofille (#34827334) Attached to: Mars Journal Issue Inspires Hundreds of One-Way Trip Volunteers

Actually I take that back, some people have kids by accident or without knowing it which isn't necessarily a selfish motivation.

Also to clarify, making one selfish decision doesn't automatically imply that one is a selfish person.

I would like to point out that your reason for having children has no bearing on how well you parent them, and that is far more important.

From Sharp minds come... pointed heads. -- Bryan Sparrowhawk

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