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FortKnox's Journal: J2EE People? 29

Journal by FortKnox
My company is desperately looking to fill in more people for contracts (looks like the java world is the first to really rebound).

If you have a good deal of J2EE experience (struts is a definate plus), gimmie a buzz, or if you are an architect level J2EE person, gimmie a buzz.

Email joshmarotti_at_yahoo.com

BTW - On the FFL, I have been superbusy, and will hopefully get back to you later this evening or early tomorrow with a draft order and an email.
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J2EE People?

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  • I'm not as experienced as I'd like to be :( or as you'd probably like me to be ;) Good luck finding people, though.
  • So, you need people who can make a great cup of coffee? Cool. I make the best damn coffee in the world. Is it ok if I drink coffee? 'Cause I drink A LOT of coffee.

    Anyway, let me know if you need references or maybe a coffee sample. ;)
    • do you strut when you make coffee? like Mick Jagger? /me refrains from making "Brown Sugar" jokes.
      • LOL! Brilliant.

        I think I should go down the hall and make a pot right now and then strut back to my desk and maybe... crow like a proud rooster! ;)
  • by Surak (18578) *
    I can write "Hello, world!" in Java, doesn't that count? :-P
    • I can write "Hello, world!" in Java, doesn't that count? :-P

      You've already got one up on most of the J2EE developers where I work then.

      • You've already got one up on most of the J2EE developers where I work then.

        Remind me to never, ever apply for a job where you work. :)
        • Remind me to never, ever apply for a job where you work. :)

          Are you kidding? You'll look like a hero! :)

          • Yeah...that's the whole problem. As soon as someone figures out that I'm one of only a handful of people that actually knows what they're doing, I'll be working on everyone ELSE's work and not just my own. While I might like to be a hero, I don't want to be a DEAD hero, thank-you-very-much! :)

  • Have any work for an entty level coder? I've got years of college experience coding and no real world experience, but I'd like to get in to the programming side of things at some point...
    • Unfortunately, no. I have several friends that keep getting laid off during this recession, so they need to start at entry level, but we're stuck in the "Few years of experience or more" state in IT, still. When things get back to normal and allow for entry level, I'll hollar.
      • You know, it would be ironic if I had a successful rock band before I became a coder. It actually seems more possible to me now than it did when I was in college (always figuired "I'll be a corporate programmer and I'll play in a band on the side and maybe make it big someday...", now it seems like I've got more of a chance getting in to the music biz first...)

        Anyhow, I'll keep my eyes open for any news from you.
      • Unfortunately, no. I have several friends that keep getting laid off during this recession, so they need to start at entry level, but we're stuck in the "Few years of experience or more" state in IT, still.

        What kind of work is it? Java wasn't really my cup of tea initially (OTOH, I hated C when I first met it, at Oxford in '96 (just a short course - my degree's from a better place :), then went on to love it...) but I've been starting to like it the last few years. My main bugbear was the old "Java's perf

        • Consulting for Enterprise websites... complex stuff. Like the past 2 years I've written banking and insurance internal websites. Almost always struts, sometimes EJB's thrown in, and all J2EE servlet/JSP (or struts domain/jsp equivalent) work.
          • Consulting for Enterprise websites... complex stuff. Like the past 2 years I've written banking and insurance internal websites. Almost always struts, sometimes EJB's thrown in, and all J2EE servlet/JSP (or struts domain/jsp equivalent) work.

            Sounds pretty interesting. I'm sort-of looking for work (either starting my own company to sell a spam-filtered high-performance mail server I developed, or working if I can get a good position somewhere in the US) - I tend to be a more low-level guy, but what, where,

        • My main bugbear was the old "Java's performance sucks" problem

          It's much better than it was, but it still sucks in many ways, particularly startup costs. But my main complaint is the lacking of debugging info available. Oh, and the development environment designed to break development tools (like make, for instance). And the bloated class libraries. And the fact that Java developers insist on reinventing the wheel... badly. Can you tell it's not my favourite language? :-)

  • What books would any of you Java people recommend for someone wanting to learn Java for writing enterprise apps? I'm already at least fairly competent in C/C++, Object Pascal (aka Delphi), Visual Basic, PHP, SQL, and (somewhat less competent with) Perl, as well as some other (less relevant) languages. I need to update my coding skills, and Java is definitely something missing from my arsenal.

    • First, start with "Thinking in Java" for Java knowledge, then move to O'Rielly's "Java Server Pages" (JSP) to understand the servlet/jsp aspect of J2EE. Next, move on to struts (just use the doc on the site [apache.org]) to learn the MVC pattern for doing java things. Then, finally, go for any EJB book you can find. Odds are it will confuse the heck outta ya, cause the only way to really tackle EJB's is experience and tutors (at least it was for me).
      • I don't read books to read them, per se... the way I approach a technical book is to start with the *examples*, figure out how they work, and then go back and read for context. Kind of a screwy way to do it, but considering how I cut my programming teeth (tearing apart other people's code, THEN looking at books for context and reference), it's the way I learn. I'd be willing to bet I'm not unique in that mindset amongst the hacker/geek culture. :)
    • I'm late to this thread - spent the week in Europe pounding out Java code. Ah, sweat internet access again...

      Anyhow, if you were just jumping in I'd recommend a couple from Wrox Publishing. Been a while since I picked up just a strait J2SE book, but I would expect Beginning Java 2, SDK 1.4 Edition [wrox.com] what the author did with his C++ book. One of the more dog-eared books on my shelf is Professional JSP - a bit dated now, and I can't speak to the new 2.0 release. Lots of examples in the JSP one. Wrox is us
      • Yep, I'm late to this thread too, also in Europe. =)

        Learning EJB's: watch out for O'Reilly's Enterprise JavaBeans book. I thought it gave a great overview to the whole struggle, but there are few pieces of example code that aren't wrong. Check out the errata page on their website... it scrolls for miles. That book needs a serious code review. Definitely not up to O'Reilly's usual level of quality.

        So for example code, check out the stuff that ships with JBoss, if you're using that. I like JBoss, but I'm no
  • Can I telecommute from my current job? Two paychecks for the price of one... :-)
    • That would be sweet as long as I could work most of the hours after I finish my daytime job. It sounds like a great fit, I just don't want to move at this time.
      • No, no... you miss the point. I mean telecommute into that job WHILE AT WORK. That was you still only work about 60 hours a week, but get two salaries.

        It was meant as a joke, I've heard it before where someone in IT is working for another company from the cubicle next to you.

  • If it were C/C++ or X86 assembly and I could telecommute I'd be all for it. [Un]Fortunately my school taught C and not Java.

    Which just goes to show I need to learn Java and get that Sun Cert.
    • Which just goes to show I need to learn Java and get that Sun Cert.
      I've got the cert. It didn't help. Unless you're willing/able to relocate, find out what technologies are being used in your area. I have a Java cert, and my previous experience was in realtime programming. I moved to Winnipeg, and got stuck doing ASP :(.

      Just because the technology is popular in general, doesn't mean it will be popular in your specific area.

      • I have one of maybe 6 actual programming jobs in my area and it's mainly C. I'm not really looking for another job, I like mine.

        Purpose of getting the Sun cert is just to prove I know it since I won't be able to get job experience.
  • I'm a one of the guys you look for. Much J2EE experience, and messing around with struts at work (well, kinda... project is on struts, and I still have to make up my mind if I hate it or love it).

    Anyways, even though I surely one of the profiles you look for, I don't think I'm your man. Should have asked 2 months ago, then I could have been ;-)

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