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You know what they call a quarter pounder with cheese...?

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  • Vincent: And you know what they call a... a... an email in Paris?
    Jules: They don't call it an email?
    Vincent: No man, they got the surrendering system. They wouldn't know what the fark an email is.
    Jules: Then what do they call it?
    Vincent: They call it a "Royale" with spam.
    Jules: A "Royale" with spam! What do they call a Big Mac?
    Vincent: A Big Mac's a Big Mac, but they call it "le Big-Mac".
    Jules: "Le Big-Mac"! Ha ha ha ha! What do they call a Whopper?
    Vincent: I dunno, I didn't go into Burger King.
  • by Xerithane (13482)
    I honestly thought this was a joke. Ah well, just one more reason to laugh at the French. I wonder how they feel about German words... <rimshot>
    • by Patik (584959) *

      Ah well, just one more reason to laugh at the French.

      Why? Because they want to preserve their language (and part of their culture) and not let it crumble into some Frenglish hybrid? I don't think this all that funny (though I did get the Pulp Fiction ref!), but it is a bit amusing that they waited this long. They probably would look more respectable if they incorporated the new term several years ago.

      Quebec bans the use of English names on storefronts and businesses (and more) for this very reason.

      • Why? Because they want to preserve their language (and part of their culture) and not let it crumble into some Frenglish hybrid?

        Uhm, yes. Exactly that. What's the point of not using an English word that has manifested itself through-out the entire world? Pretention. It's absolutely absurd to try to invent a new word, just because you don't happen to like it's origin.

        I don't think this all that funny (though I did get the Pulp Fiction ref!), but it is a bit amusing that they waited this long. They pr
        • FYI - they are called 'french' fries because of the way the potato is cut to make them (its 'frenched'). The french didn't invent them, I believe it was a brit.
        • by Patik (584959) *

          What's the point of not using an English word that has manifested itself through-out the entire world? Pretention.

          No, pretention is forcing your term on other cultures or encouraging them to come up with their own non-English word. Preserving your culture is not pretentious.

          It's absolutely absurd to try to invent a new word, just because you don't happen to like it's origin.

          They didn't do this because the word was American, they did it because it was not French.

          • No, pretention is forcing your term on other cultures or encouraging them to come up with their own non-English word. Preserving your culture is not pretentious.

            Sorry, I don't seem to recall any English-based push for everybody to use e-mail. For that matter, the guy who created it called it e-mail. Do the French call Fords or Chevrolets some made-up word as well?

            Preserving your culture by inventing a new word. Right.
            • by Patik (584959) *

              I don't seem to recall any English-based push for everybody to use e-mail.

              There wasn't one, but that doesn't matter. The French are simply providing their own word for something.

              Preserving your culture by inventing a new word. Right.

              Courrier has always been the French word for "mail". The guy who created e-mail didn't invent a new word either (it's still "electronic mail"), he just applied the appropriate pre-existing words to it, like the French are doing now.

              • There wasn't one, but that doesn't matter. The French are simply providing their own word for something.

                Ok, well then... I'll just go ahead and start calling email "E-French-is-a-stupid-language" and it's no big deal then. I'm just providing my own word for it. See, it's dumb. It's idiotic.

                Courrier has always been the French word for "mail". The guy who created e-mail didn't invent a new word either (it's still "electronic mail"), he just applied the appropriate pre-existing words to it, like the Fr
                • Trying to preserve the "purity" of a language is elitism and xenophobia.

                  Now I know you're pulling my leg. The french elitist? Say it isn't so!
          • Preserving your culture is not pretentious.
            Pretending that your culture exists in a vacuum and is unchanging is not only pretentious but foolhardy.

            Franko will eventually have to use English words, but in the meantime "latrine" and "rendezvous" will be joined by other Frency imports.

            Add spices to taste, stir thoroughly, simmer. Eat when done.

        • What's the point of not using an English word that has manifested itself through-out the entire world? ... This is on par with the US calling them "Freedom Fries."

          No it is not. They have not translated the word because they hate some country, they have translated it because the word is not French.
          • No it is not. They have not translated the word because they hate some country, they have translated it because the word is not French.

            They didn't translate it! They made up a new word that is like "courrier." If it was translated I wouldn't find it retarded. Since they just invented a new word, it is retarded.
        • Why? Because they want to preserve their language (and part of their culture) and not let it crumble into some Frenglish hybrid?


        And why not? The English had to deal with the French making an awful mess out of THEIR native language, why should we Americans get back at the French for, in the end, sticking us with this confusing language?
  • I didn't quite get your joke..
    Anyway, in Hebrew it's similar. The half-official word for email is "doal" (mail=doar and the "l" for electronic), and it's used mostly on written communication. People still prefer saying "email" when speaking.
    • its a quote from "Pulp Fiction" when they are talkinga bout what the french call a "Quarter Pounder With Cheese", because france is in the metric system.
    • Because when I saw the JE's subject heading, I thought, "Trayf? Really, really trayf?" (I'm actually the token shiksa around here, but I look for meat-based food with hexures on them (now) because I need my food dairy-free.) In any case, a Quarter Pounder with Cheese is something I don't eat for about three reasons. :)

      Since I'm also learning Hebrew, I'm going to remember that word for e-mail. Thanks!
      • You know, it seems that Americans know Yiddish better than Israelis. Many words are pronounced differently in Israel (trayf -> taref) and the rest aren't in use at all, like yarmulke (kipa in Hebrew) or that word for oznei haman (the poppy-filled thing that some people eat in Purim) which I forgot.

        (I'm talking about the normal, secular audience. Yiddish is still in use among the orthodox ashkenazim)

        (After reading your journal) Damn, you have a fiance? No shiksa for me, I guess. ;)
        • that word for oznei haman (the poppy-filled thing that some people eat in Purim) which I forgot...

          Hamentaschen. I think it means "Haman's ears" also.

          I agree about your larger point. There are many more Yiddish words in general use in American English than are used in Israel, especially among Sephardim. It's probably comparable to the level of usage of Arabic words in Hebrew.

  • The whole story talks about banning "e-mail". Why do people insist on the hyphen? It's like a typed out way of doing those stupid finger quotes that people do. Like I have to emphasize that this is *E* mail so you dont go heading for the mailbox. It's a different animal entirely, not a special version of traditional mail.

    Way to piss of the French. If they really did ban "e-mail" feel free to write of "email" all you want. :)

    • I use the hyphen because it's a designator. Written, it looks better, to me. I'm not sure if there's an (fingerquote) official (/fingerquote) ruling on it, but when I'm writing about e-mail, I think it reads better than email. Like She-Hulk or Spider-Man. Although I think I remember that Spiderman doesn't use the hyphen because Jon Stewart was making fun of the pronunciation (like goldman or chairman). Maybe I'm thinking of Prince Namor, the Sub-Mariner.

      Anyway, you dont' say the hyphen when you speak "e-

  • But remember, the US is the country full of arrogance.

    This is nice.

    Reminds me of a linguistical version of the Nazi Party. That's right, I just equated the french language to Nazis.

    Em Rulz. U R teh suck.

    Uh...yeah. Go Bears!
  • michael appears to be on duty, so here's to get it in (especially since he appears to enjoy posting paranoia stories today):

    Set it to a YRO story on Censorship. Twist the write-up into how French government is restricting people from using the word email in all respects. Make comment on how you'll never visit France or drink French wine ever again because of it.

    That should work.
  • It is a bastard language by root (with all of its Teutonic, Gallic, and Rommantic trappings) and then has evolved at a staggering pace with all of the regional variations. With that it has gained various tones and subtleties that really give it breath. Cajun and pidgin variants are subsummed and assimilated into the mainstream. It is inclusive by default.

    Compare that to this crap. Damn, this just sounds like xenophobia to me. I wonder what the Algerians and Haitians think of this? I assume that they
  • This is so old, I wonder why you even picked it up. I have heard that term ages ago. Alas, you probably don't care that virtually nobody uses the term "email" here anyway. Most people just call it "mail". Yup, if we say "mail" we mean "email"....

    As for the french renaming things, they always do... doesn't always work. They are inherently wary of introducing foreign words in their language, which is understandable because they want to keep a cultural identity (and cultural idenitity implies language)

  • Well, message this!
    • Me too!

      (I've always been one of the obnoxious ones!)

      ....Bethanie....
    • BTW - quit arguing in the 'france changes email' JE

      Well, message this!

      Can't you just leave the poor guy alone?! He doesn't want to keep getting messages from a journal he left long ago. He has important things he has to do, like take showers with the newly re-acquired power at his house, and read about football division re-alignments. Oooh - I like dashes - d-a-s-h-e-s - wow - I'm going to replace all my .'s with -'s - How fun -

      Oy, what's that? Oh, sorry Josh, I'll try and keep the noise to a minimum

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