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FortKnox's Journal: Moon Holds Answers To Baby Earth? 8

Journal by FortKnox
(I'm not in the mood to format this for a slashdot submission, so if someone wants to try, go ahead).

I recently read an interesting article from space.com on Y! about how the moon's surface may contain secrets of Earth from a few million+ years ago (and possibly Venus, also).

When we studied the moonrocks brought back from the Apollo missions, we found that the surface of the moon contains very, very old rock. On earth, atmosphere and tectonic activity constantly buries layers of soil below, but the moon has neither atmosphere nor tectonic activity, so its surface hasn't moved much over centuries.

Anyway, the article suggests that when earth was hit by large asteroids (like those that may of killed the dinosaurs), pieces of soil may of actually been launched fast enough to hit and lie on the surface of the moon. Scientists could study these "ancient earth soil samples" and give us a better clue of how the earth was before the asteroid hit.

There is also speculation that the moon could contain soil from venus (which we won't be able to study anytime soon, due to its extrodinary high surface temperatures), which would give planetary geologists a great artifact to study.

So, to try and find these rocks would require a trip to the moon. Something not done since the 70s. I'd think that a 'mars rover'-like robotic experiment may be a good way to accomplish this. Create a robot that could be used on other planets (like Mars) that will scour the rocks in search of "planetary asteroid debris".

Anywho, I found the article to be a fun read. Here's hoping we see another man on the moon, soon.
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Moon Holds Answers To Baby Earth?

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  • ...put an end to the "We didn't land on the moon" conspiracy theories. I'm not saying whether or not I believe them, I'm only saying that I wish we would go to the moon again, and maybe then I'll have a reason to buy a nicer telescope. :-)
  • How can you tell what is Venus dirt and what is Earth dirt and how do you know it isn't just plain old moon dirt? Are they 'labeled' somehow?
  • ~ venus (which we won't be able to study anytime soon, due to its extrodinary high surface temperatures), ~.
    Not so fast, bub! Russia already landed something on Venus... NINE TIMES [nasa.gov] !! Okay, well the first one was a bust, but still.

    Check it out; and if the elevator starts to bring you down/go crazy/punch a higher floor

    • Those are cool pictures. Its really fascinating to see pictures of a planets surface that so far away. I've stared at the mars rover pictures for a long time. Dunno why I find it so fascinating. I guess seeing a planet in a telescope is exciting, but knowing all the technology and patience required to see the actual surface is just extrodinary.
      • Yeah, those are cool. I wish they could have more pictures, and more in color.

        Just thinking about the technical issues with creating something that has to withstand 450+ degrees for more than an hour is mind-boggling.

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