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Comment: Re:NEC LCD2490WUXi2-BK 24" (Score 1) 375

by Foobar_ (#42904011) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Is Your Favorite Monitor For Programming?

Seconded. This is a solid workstation monitor for graphics or text. I have the LCD2490WUXI rev 1, which I bought it to replace my FP950 when something in its vertical deflection opened up.

It comes with or without a color calibrator. The regular gamut 1920x1200 IPS display has full adjustments for color, gamma, black level, backlight brightness, pixel overdrive, display scaling, etc.

The scaler also includes an adjustable border overlap, so that you can make the monitor display the image as if the bezel was floating on top of the image instead of pushing it to the side. I don't use that mode though.

I've used this monitor since 2008. The CCFL backlight produces even light. After four years of heavy use, it is still going strong.

The only difference is that the v2 a different polarizer -- at high viewing angles, the v2 screen has a gray cast, while the v1 keeps the right colors and contrast.

Downside is basically its size; this monitor is bulkier than a modern flat screen at 4 inches deep (12 inch deep footprint). It has industrial styling but that's what you get from NEC.

Best monitor I've ever used. Good luck finding one.

Comment: Re:So, that would be... (Score 1) 65

by Foobar_ (#41302581) Attached to: Intel Encodes Data In Flickering LEDs (and Shows Off Other Bright Ideas)

The rise and fall times of the phosphor in a white LED is several milliseconds which severely constrains the bandwidth of a white LED. The red LEDs featured here have no phosphor, with rise/fall times of 1-2 nanoseconds and correspondingly high bandwidth (hundreds of MHz).

Comment: Re:Oldest file? (Score 1) 498

by Foobar_ (#34674418) Attached to: What's the Oldest File You Can Restore?

Nice work writing your own, but RAR has been able to extract from and recover truncated, broken, or corrupt ZIP and RAR archives for some time now. It also works with broken Office 2007 documents.
In the Windows GUI version, enable "Keep broken files" in the extract dialog to extract all available files. Without this switch enabled, WinRAR informs you of the CRC errors but deletes the bad files.
For the CLI version available for Windows/Linux/BSD/OSX, execute "rar e -kb archivename" to extract bad files. Watch the error window or stderr for extraction errors.
You can also use its recovery feature "rar r [-kb] archivename" which will examine the archive (ZIP or RAR only), regenerate its file index, and copy the files into a new archive for you.

Comment: Re:Why trust your ears? Unless you're blind that i (Score 1) 620

by Foobar_ (#34639312) Attached to: Electric Cars May Be Made Noisier By Law

Pedestrian on phone killed by truck

Toronto Police say the woman was standing on the northwest corner of Front St. and Blue Jays Way just before 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, waiting to cross to the south side of the street, when a southbound delivery truck pulled up to the intersection and turned right in front of her as the light changed.
"The victim was on a cellphone at the time and she literally walked into the side of the truck as it was making its turn," Sgt. Tim Burrows said yesterday. "She was knocked down and the rear wheels of the truck drove over top of her."

"I think society is in a sad state if it needs to pass a law to protect people from this," Burrows said, adding a little common sense should be all that's needed.

Comment: If you don't want to surf redirects (Score 4, Informative) 38

by Foobar_ (#34604884) Attached to: How To Cut a Nanotube? Lots Of Compression

Here's the Brown/KIST researchers' video, a rendered simulation showing the buckling action http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzNqW_d0QGc&fmt=18

This is a mildly related movie of actual electron microscopy of a flat graphene sheet finding its most stable configuration after a hole was punched in it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EogdalfXF4c&feature=related&fmt=18

The broken nanotube under high pressure has the advantage of having lots of other carbon atoms in a similar predicament close enough nearby that the tube's wall can reform, while the flat sheet simply falls apart due to its own tension and lattice vibrations.

Comment: Re:What we really want to know (Score 1) 157

by Foobar_ (#33614884) Attached to: New HRP-4 Humanoid Robots From Japan To Go On Sale

There is a robot dance competition called Robo-One Gate. It was held last year at the International Robot Exposition trade show in Tokyo. It is associated with with the Robo-One Competition, which features robots wrestling and just had its 18th event.
101,000 people visited the four-day marketing bonanza IREx 2009. The next one is being held in 2011.

Links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ROBO-ONE
http://singularityhub.com/2009/12/24/so-you-think-your-robot-can-dance-videos/
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=international+robot+exposition
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=robo-one

Comment: Re:Plus flying cars? (Score 2, Informative) 125

by Foobar_ (#33197840) Attached to: Highly Directional Terahertz Laser Demonstrated

If it's a laser pointer made with a red (670, 650, 635 nm), blue (445 nm), or violet (405 nm) laser diode, there's absolutely no infrared emitted.

If it's a properly made diode-pumped solid-state laser pointer (532 nm green, 473 nm blue, 404 nm frequency doubled violet) there's an infrared filter in the optical train which removes the large amounts of invisible pump light and leaves only the visible green.

If it's a crap green laser pointer (e.g. the "high power" green pointers sold on eBay and the like) then there is a real possibility the manufacturer omitted the IR filter to increase profits and/or the balloon-popping potential of the pointer. Check with a laser power meter and an IR-passing filter to verify the lack of IR output.

If no such tools are available, use a camera sensitive to infrared, block the visible beam with a filter, and check that no IR is coming out. IR-passing, visible-blocking filters around the house include the tinted plastic windows on remote controls and the front panels of remote-controlled devices, exposed color photo film negatives, and the disks of coated Mylar film inside floppy disks. Those last two should never be used as filters to observe the Sun due to the fact they totally pass IR and you can cook your retina in seconds without realizing anything bad is happening.

Infrared leaks may not be collimated like the green beam and will be visible (on camera) as a beam, cone, or ugly spray of light coming out of the filtered device.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_pointer#Infrared_hazards_of_DPSS_laser_pointers

There are reflected light hazards to worry about with all lasers. For example, shining the laser onto a smooth or polished floor in the direction of your pet will result in some light making a dot on the floor and most of the light bouncing off into your pet's eyes. If you can see the laser's reflection light up your pet's face, you may be causing eye damage.

If it's a high-power laser pointer (output over 5 mW) you are being carelessly negligent in its operation if you're waving it around in any situation where people or animals can get hit in the eye with its beam. Safe eye exposure is probably much less for cats and dogs due to the presence of a tapetum lucidum which concentrates light hitting their retina, their much larger pupils which take in much more light, and active suppression of the blink/turn reflex due to the fact they're chasing that dot and don't want to look away from their quarry.

Comment: Raynaud's sufferers better turn it off (Score 3, Informative) 102

by Foobar_ (#33077126) Attached to: Thermoelectrics Could Let You Feel the Heat In Games

Some people have the circulation in their fingers and toes close off when their skin gets cold, which results in ischemia followed by inflammation once the circulation returns. Repeated events cause skin damage, connective tissue atrophy, and eventually you might lose your fingers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud's_disease

Comment: Re:The tubers are almost certainly not salty. (Score 4, Interesting) 117

by Foobar_ (#32939076) Attached to: First Halophile Potatoes Harvested

Wouldn't this lead to a build-up of salt in the soil itself? At some point, that's bound to cause problems... They don't call it "salting the earth" for nothing.

We already have regular potatoes that grow just fine with fresh water. These new halophile potatoes won't be grown on regular farmland.

There are large areas of coast and riverbank that have no easy access to fresh water, but plenty of salt or brackish water. There are also an increasing number of agricultural areas who use reclaimed wastewater (greywater) to irrigate their fields. Finally, sea levels are expected to rise due to Manbearpig, and this will increase the amount of floodplain affected by brackish water.

This new strain of potato is going to be grown in areas with brackish water, on or near estuaries, and probably to a lesser extent areas irrigated with lightly-treated greywater. Depending on how much salt they can tolerate, you might eventually see them being grown underneath coconut.

Comment: Shout-outs to two idiots (Score 5, Insightful) 342

by Foobar_ (#32077550) Attached to: Rest In Peas — the Death of Speech Recognition

This blog post is retarded. The author is correlating a drop in internet news articles about Dragon NaturallySpeaking with a flatlining of speech recognition accuracy rate.

The Slashdot editor Soulskill is retarded for both not realizing this and for not reading the anonymously-submitted blog post (hmm no way it could have been the author) before approving it for the Slashdot front page. The guy is just out for more traffic to his rather pointless tech news commentary blog.

Decline of Slashdot, internet signal-to-noise ratio, get off my lawn, etc.

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