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Submission + - Cost of Pre-Screening all youTube content: US$37 Billion (

Fluffeh writes: "The folks that push "Anti-Piracy" and "Copying is Stealing" seem to often request that Google pre-screens content going up on YouTube and of course expect Google to cover the costs. No-one ever really asks the question how much it would cost, but some nicely laid out math by a curious mind points to a pretty hefty figure indeed. Starting with who to employ, their salary expectations and how many people it would take to cover the 72 hours of content uploaded every minute, the numbers start to get pretty large, pretty quickly. US$37 billion a year. Now compare that to Google's revenue for last year."

Submission + - Music sales falling, despite French anti-P2P Laws (

Fluffeh writes: "France has one of the strictest "Three Strikes" laws in the world enforced by a French authority called Hadopi, but it is interesting to see that although the studios pushed so hard for these, they don't seem to be having the effect of raising sales, they are declining — even if they are slowing down piracy. Hadopi released a report this March saying French ISP users had significantly decreased their illegal file sharing. Despite that announcement, the French music industry still saw a decline in revenue. "For all the fanfare in Hadopi's 14-page report celebrating the crackdown on music and video piracy, the music and video industries in France did not see increased profit in 2011 compared to the year before. The overall recorded music industry saw a 3.9 percent loss, and France's video market dropped 2.7 percent overall.""

Submission + - Boxee fights FCC for its service (

Fluffeh writes: "Last month, an interesting fight broke out concerning the cable companies' desire to block out competing set top boxes. The simplified version is that the cable companies asked the FCC for a waiver to allow them to encrypt basic cable signals — something they're currently forbidden from doing. The cable companies insist they need to do this to "stop piracy" (of course). From all the indications and scuttlebutt around DC, it seems clear that the FCC has been leaning towards approving this waiver, though realizing that it would kill off an innovative product like Boxee has taken the commissioners by surprise."

Let's organize this thing and take all the fun out of it.