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Comment: Re:Might be a lesson here for Linus Torvalds (Score 1) 355

by Flavianoep (#48505869) Attached to: James Watson's Nobel Prize Goes On Auction This Week

So when Torvalds goes off calling highly proficient engineers morons on public mailing lists, he's defended as doing what's necessary to run a large project. But as he gets older he might find that at some point that behavior isn't going to be tolerated, and all of these earlier incidents are going to be recalled.

While you forecast might turn out to be true, there are big differences between blacks, women and engineers.

Blacks have been historically held as inferior, and that was a justification for the slave trade (perhaps such justification came after the fact, I don't know). Therefore since the times of slave trade, they have been denied power to decide for themselves, which is why the boundaries between African countries are as troublesome as the boundaries between East and Central European countries were till the Great War.

Women have been historically held as inferior as well, and used to be considered a commodity in the Ancient Ages. There are still some things women must fight for until they may not need to be better than men to be held as equal in some areas.

About bias against engineers, do someone know of some?

+ - Kim Dotcom declares he is 'broke' because of legal fight

Submitted by mrspoonsi
mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Kim Dotcom, the founder of the seized file-sharing site Megaupload, has declared himself "broke". The entrepreneur said he had spent $10m (£6.4m) on legal costs since being arrested in New Zealand in 2012 and accused of internet piracy. Mr Dotcom had employed a local law firm to fight the US's attempt to extradite him, but his defence team stepped down a fortnight ago without explaining why. Mr Dotcom said he would now represent himself at a bail hearing on Thursday. He denies charges of racketeering, conspiring to commit copyright infringement and money laundering. He told a conference in London, via a video link, that his lawyers had resigned because he had run out of money. "The [US authorities] have certainly managed to drain my resources and dehydrate me, and without lawyers I am defenceless," he said. "They used that opportunity to try and get my bail revoked and that's what I'm facing.""

+ - Bitcoin is not anonymous after all->

Submitted by Taco Cowboy
Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have demonstrated that it is possible to figure out the IP address and therefore the identity of individuals who pay for transactions anonymously online using bitcoins

In an open-access paper entitled Deanonymisation of clients in Bitcoin P2P network — http://orbilu.uni.lu/handle/10... — the researchers explain bitcoins do not protect the IP addresses of users, and these can be linked to the user's transactions in real time, even if the client uses different pseudonyms for each transaction

The researchers say a hacker could discover the identity of a bitcoin user by using several computers and spending just under €1,500 (£1,190, $1,871) on such a deanonymisation attack

There are several ways for a hacker to generate a malformed message and pretend it has been sent by a user on the peer-to-peer bitcoin network, even if the message has been sent from one of Tor's exit nodes

For example, say there are 1,008 Tor exit nodes. The hacker just needs to establish 1,008 connections and send a few megabytes of data to all connections from the Tor exit nodes to Bitcoin servers

Once the attacker knows what all the servers are and the bitcoin users have been banned from accessing these servers using Tor, they will then have to access the servers the normal way

"It shows that the level of network anonymity provided by Bitcoin is quite low. Several features of the Bitcoin protocol makes the attack possible. In particular, we emphasise that the stable set of only eight entry nodes is too small, as the majority of these nodes' connections can be captured by an attacker"

Every time the user's client makes a connection to an entry node of the bitcoin server, its address (perhaps an IP address associated with a major internet service provider) will be advertised

Once the hacker knows this address, he can trick the bitcoin server into revealing the IP address of the user

"The crucial idea of our attack is to identify each client by an octet of outgoing connections it establishes. This octet of Bitcoin peers [entry nodes] serves as a unique identifier of a client for the whole duration of a user session and will differentiate even those users who share the same NAT IP address," the authors stress

"As soon as the attacker receives the transaction from just two to three entry nodes he can with very high probability link the transaction to a specific client""

Link to Original Source

+ - Auto industry teams up with military to stop car hacking->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A team of hackers is collaborating with military and industry groups to develop cyber security defences for commercially available cars, in response to a growing threat from criminals and terrorists. In the UK, hackers are now responsible for a third of car thefts in London and there are fears that while technology is progressing, older models will remain vulnerable to attack.

Although there have been no reported instances of a car being completely commandeered outside of controlled conditions, during tests hackers come out on top every time – unlocking car boots, setting off windscreen wipers, locking brakes, and cutting the engine.

“As security has not been a prime objective for vehicle manufacturers in the past these systems have been tightly integrated, leading to a situation where the security of an in-car media player can affect the car's brakes,” explained senior information security consultant at MWR InfoSecurity, Jacques Louw."

Link to Original Source

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