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Comment: Re:What to know (Score 1) 548

I didn't realize the .NET bubble popped. In the mid-atlantic area, there are a lot of people looking for SEASONED .NET Developers, commanding 6 figure salaries. I know the start-up community shies away from .NET (which is an understatement), but the corporate world has a lot of use for .NET, and appears to do so for the time being.


Your mileage may vary.

Comment: Re:This is how business should be done (Score 2) 168

by FearTheDonut (#47530661) Attached to: Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell
Yes, I agree with this. But, at some point, investors need to get a return on their investment: it's what they asked for and it is required by law. The have never paid a dividend (as far as I can tell), and so their stock price is the only real way to get a return on the investment. At what point does "avoiding short-term profits for long term gains" become a losing bet? When does "long term" happen? That's what investors want to know.

Comment: Avoiding Amazon Web Services? (Score 3, Interesting) 168

by FearTheDonut (#47530633) Attached to: Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell
As a software engineer who is often asked to consider "the cloud," at what point should things like poor company performance impact software design decisions? It's easy to say not to use the cloud, but the cost savings for some make it irresistible. I suppose at some point AWS might go away due to a CEO change, corporate shift, etc., but I have a feeling that, with all of the consumer services using AWS, it will be considered "too big to fail," and be required to stay up (and, therefore, I won't have any reason to consider AMZN's performance as a software design concern.


Anyone have thoughts on this?

Comment: Re:Computer Science curriculum (Score 1) 293

by FearTheDonut (#47245287) Attached to: Average HS Student Given Little Chance of AP CS Success
That's interesting to hear. I think my school (University of Delaware, class 2003) mostly assumed you had that entering in the program. It might well have changed.

That being said, I do take issue with one thing: as far as I can imagine, there is only one way to skin a cat. :)

Comment: Re:Computer Science curriculum (Score 1) 293

by FearTheDonut (#47245069) Attached to: Average HS Student Given Little Chance of AP CS Success
For a standard high-school "computer" class, yes, I agree with you. 100%. But I'm referring to Advanced Placement classes, where it's gearing you for college credits. It should teach them the same things I've had to learn my first class in CS: basic algorithm development, pointer arithmetic, registers. (My first intro to CS class has us learning C inside and out).

Is this the exception for CS classes now? Or a typical program?

Comment: Computer Science curriculum (Score 1) 293

by FearTheDonut (#47244889) Attached to: Average HS Student Given Little Chance of AP CS Success
Does anyone know exactly what is taught in a CS AP class? I'm sure a lot of people would love to be in a "AP CS" class, but the cold, hard reality is that CS can be very different than what many people thing. Just learning JavaScript to make a hip HTML 5 website, while entertaining to some, is not Computer Science. But teach Lisp/Scheme to the students to learn the value of S-Expressions, or algorithm development will help lead others down the road of Computer Science. Just Building A WebSite != Computer Science.

Comment: Re:republican voters? (Score 1) 422

by FearTheDonut (#47231457) Attached to: FWD.us: GOP Voters To Be Targeted By Data Scientists
I hear what you're saying about hostility towards law breakers / etc.
Now, if blanket amnesty were passed (as in, no such thing as 'Illegal Immigants'), I seriously doubt that the majority of that hostility would suddenly go away. I also can't picture those same people who are simply trying to support the law be just as passionate as protecting the new citizen / aliens rights.

Perhaps I simply lack imagination.

(Also, I don't ever expect that type of law ever to be passed, nor necessarily think that's a good thing.)

Comment: Re:Oh my ... (Score 1) 253

I'm wasting Mod Points on this reply.


You are correct in that they had filibuster-proof majority for a brief time. HOWEVER, Obamacare / ACTA (which ever you prefer) was passed with Republican help, only after they lost their super-majority. Remember Ted Kennedy dying? That caused them to lose their majority. Before that, if Democrats were lock-step, we'd be having real socialized health-care instead of these marketplaces. The market-place idea (similar to Romney-care, as I understand) was the compromise to get Olympia Snow and others to vote for universal healthcare. If you are an extremely right-wing person, you should be glad that the democrats aren't lock-step for this reason alone.

...when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. - Fred Brooks, Jr.

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