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Comment Re:Yes! (Score 3, Informative) 737

I switched to a Mac in 2012 for my personal shit and about 6 months ago went to a Mac for work too. With the release of Office 2016 for the Mac, I honestly cannot find a single thing I cannot do comfortably on my Mac anymore.

If you have a serious problem with it, Parallels has been running Windows apps for me better than any native PC installation since version 7 back in 2012.

I mean, I know you're probably trolling or trying to be funny, but it's a dead joke in 2015.

Comment Re:Drunks don't make the best decisions (Score 1) 327

Calling him an irresponsible douchebag for potentially driving w/in the legal limits is a bit much, don't you think?

While I don't drink and drive, by setting a limit at .08, the government is permitting SOME drinking and driving, albeit at a level which is complicated to pass legally more or less forcing you to choose between not driving or not drinking while providing the people some semblance of choice.

If they're going to do this, they should make it so low (.02) no one will drive after drinking, as they do in other countries, or bring it back to an acceptable level to allow for driving after drinking.

Comment Re:Going out of business ... (Score 1) 200

I envision this as a response to Maxim or FHM. People still buy those, even though there's no nudity. Playboy was always able to find some level of legitimacy through their articles and I assume they will still attempt the same level of content even by removing the nudity.

Honestly, I don't see the point in this and they should just retire the magazine and create a new one w/o nudity to compete with the others in that genre; however, they clearly feel they will be able to capitalize successfully on their established fan base and grow it into the future using this new format.

Best of luck to them.

Comment Re:Who actually wants this? (Score 1) 66

Well if it means we're going from small devices with small apps and small amounts of resources to suddenly making them full on desktop machines, I just don't see the point.

And that's totally fine. The point isn't what YOU want, it's what some private company wants to do and these actions will in no way, shape, or form negatively impact your life and thus getting all up in a huff about it is a little over the top.

Comment Re:Who actually wants this? (Score 2) 66

What percentage of Android owners even remotely want any of this?

Users don't know what they want until it is provided to them and, honestly, if you don't want any part of it, that's cool but perhaps it will really help developers port their work cross-platform and bring us to a completely different level.

I would love to see Android or iOS apps come back across the divide in some cases, so there's likely a market in reverse.

No sense in getting all fired up about CodeWeavers doing this.

Comment Re:It's not just IT (Score 0) 152

I agree with you, just not your example. Pharmacy Techs are on-the-job trained in a few days and get paid just north of minimum wage. The technical skills required to do that job aren't complex and those leading the area should have to do the same on-the-job training as the staff. Comparing that world to most IT specializations is a HUGE leap.

Comment Re:In other words. (Score 3, Insightful) 288

The law should NEVER, EVER, EVER, provide protection over any data available behind public sector activity.

The public sector frequently claims the release of information will be burdensome; however, the public sector actors are not always forced, by statute (as they are in Minnesota) to ensure records should be held in a way which the sector cannot claim burden in failure to comply.

This needs to change.

Comment And yet, even at 24, it's not the year of Linux (Score 0, Flamebait) 152

I've been using Linux, in varying capacities in both my personal and work life, since that fateful day in fall of 1996 when I popped a Slackware CD into my Dell Latitude P-133 laptop. Yet, I still don't love it as much as I should.

Why? Because, as I found out this week when I installed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on a VM to power a SAS installation at work, it still sucks in so many ways. Is it better than it was 19 years ago? Not really. I still had to think; still had to work to get the damn thing to run; and grub still gave me a rash and a shit to get up and running.

Yeah, the Debian install I originally made back in November of 2002 is still running, after many a dist-upgrade, and it's going strong; however, I still have my love/hate w/Linux after nearly 20 years living with it daily.

I've always been excited for the next big thing. The next moment when it would be that system I could easily use on my desktop or laptop and interoperate w/the rest of the world; yet, here I am, typing this on a machine, provided to me by my company, I never thought I'd use (a MBPr), ever.

Yeah, Linux runs the Internet and many of our phones, yet, I still hate it as much as I did when I was 17 years old, for many of the same reasons.

I'll be happily waiting for another 24 while it continues to grow and do its thing but, unlike the visions many of us saw for Linux back in the day, it has not shaped up like we thought it would. Successful? ABSOLUTELY. But as successful and brilliant as it should be 24 years later, ABSOLUTELY NOT.

Comment Re:But... but? (Score 1) 172

You need an account to store favorites, and to follow channels via subscription. That's why I bother logging in. Also, it lets me keep that stupid auto-play feature disabled. I don't know why that defaults to enabled. I'm watching some video, maybe just listening to it from another tab, and the assumption is that I want to auto-play some randomly-similar video after that. No I don't, why assume I do? Being logged in keeps that thing off like it should be.

You have a massage (from the Swedish prime minister).