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+ - Bullied Victim of Videotaped Beatdown Suspended

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "Casey Heynes took one punch from his attacker and turned the other cheek. Then he took another. But when his younger tormentor floated like a butterfly while a schoolchum videotaped the beatdown for posterity, it was Heynes who stung like a bee, putting an end to the attack by bodyslamming the bully and walking away. The school, of course, suspended both the bully and his victim for four days. Any King Solomon-advice for the school administrators? BTW, kudos to the girl who stepped in and told the other kids to back off as Heynes walked away from the incident."

+ - WikiLeaks cash-for-votes exposé rocks Indian -> 1

Submitted by mage7
mage7 (1984526) writes "While the world's attention seems to be focused on the events unfolding in Japan and the Middle-east, Indian headlines are being dominated by the latest WikiLeaks' revelations.
The newly leaked cable (dated 17 July 2008) suggests that India's ruling Congress party bribed MPs, in order to secure their votes for a controversial nuclear deal between India and the US. Among other details, It describes how a senior Congress aide showed a US embassy official "chests of cash" allegedly containing about $25 million to pay off MPs ahead of the vote. Another Congress insider told a US official about how the Minister of Commerce and Industry formerly "could only offer small planes as bribes.....now he can pay for votes with jets.""

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Comment: The students were active participants (Score 1) 181

by FarHat (#35076802) Attached to: US Authorities GPS Tagging Duped Indian Students

You just have to go an immigration forum dominated by Indians like murthyforum.com and search for TVU. You will find posts as far back as last year where people were discussing TVU as a university which would issue you a CPT (curricular practical training) from day one had no classes and you could start working right away with other people warning this was a fraud. The discussions were long and many people wanted to work from day one. Often it was people who were laid off from their jobs, could not find something in the short period thereafter, so you join this "university", change to an F-1, get a CPT and start working elsewhere without the limitations that an H1 imposes.

Comment: Re:Let's go ahead and quote from the report: (Score 1) 764

by FarHat (#32095090) Attached to: Second Inquiry Exonerates Climatic Research Unit

Science isn't mathematics. In the most fundamental case, I would argue that any imprecision implies some degree of subjectivity, and no measurement made by a human has infinite precision.

Objectivity doesn't imply infinite precision. In fact, infinite precision is impossible, and we can still have extremely objective theories and measurements in quantum mechanics.

Comment: Re:Asking for it (Score 1) 938

by FarHat (#31007100) Attached to: Studies Reveal Why Kids Get Bullied and Rejected

I think this is a wrong way of looking at it. Think of it like defensive driving. Regardless of who is at fault in a car accident, defensive driving reduces the chance of you getting into a collision. Learning behaviors that reduce the likelihood of you getting bullied is similar. Moreover, unlike car accidents where you do have some recourse after the accident in bullying you are usually out on your own. Teachers don't believe you, at worst they often take the sides of the bullies and a lot of teachers are former bullies themselves. Also, changing the behavior of one kid who has a good incentive to change behavior (not get bullied) is much easier than changing the behavior of everyone else who have little to gain from not bullying and something to lose (dominance).

Robotics

+ - First Armed Robots on Patrol in Iraq

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Robots have been roaming Iraq, since shortly after the war began. Now, for the first time — the first time in any warzone — the 'bots are carrying guns. The SWORDS robots, armed with M249 machine guns, "haven't fired their weapons yet," an Army official says. "But that'll be happening soon." The machines have actually been ready to a while, but safety concerns kept 'em off the battlefield. Now, the robots have kill switches, so "now we can kill the unit if it goes crazy," according to the Army. I feel safer already."
The Internet

+ - Muslims and the digital divide->

Submitted by
catherine odonnell
catherine odonnell writes "Aug. 1, 2007 | Politics and Government
Muslim political parties grow online but digital divide continues to widen
Catherine O'Donnell cath2@u.washington.edu

    World Information Access Report 2007
The WIA Project investigates causes and consequences of the global digital divide.

  Political life in Muslim countries is surprisingly wired, according to researchers at the University of Washington.

In 2000, fewer than 50 political parties from Muslim countries had Web sites. By 2007, there were more than 200 parties represented online, the majority of them secular. The expansion of online politics in the Muslim world outpaces that of the rest of the developing world.

Also in 2000, 40 percent of the world's political parties were online, and 28 percent of parties in developing countries were online, but only 16 percent of parties in Muslim countries were online. Political parties in the Muslim world have quickly caught up, and today 38 percent of the political parties in Muslim and other developing countries are online. These figures likely reflect overall growth of political content in blogs, chat groups and listservs, said Philip Howard, an assistant professor of communication at the University of Washington who with his students prepared the World Information Access Report.

"We only looked for Web sites produced by an official party organization," said Howard.

"It is probably now safe to say that there is a political blogging community in every country, and that in some countries the Internet is the only infrastructure for political debate.

"No dictator has been toppled because of the Internet," Howard added, "but today, no democratic movement can topple a dictator without the Internet."

World Information Access researchers, who review trends in the global digital divide, studied data on political party Web sites from 2000, 2005 and 2007. They covered 212 countries and thousands of political parties — 3,217 parties in 2007 alone.

This boom in online political life in Muslim countries is surprising given the digital divide between rich and poor countries. Wealthier ones have more high-speed broadband service, which means citizens get more information more quickly. In contrast, many citizens in poorer countries continue using dial-up services, which are slower but less expensive.

Other findings from the report:

Many poor governments depend on Web site hosting services in wealthy countries such as Canada and the United States. One-third of all nations maintain some of their government Web sites on servers in the U.S., and one-fourth maintain all of their government Web sites on servers in the U.S.

Three-fourths of national libraries have Web sites but only 54 percent load in the country's national language. For example, Tajikistan's national library offers online access in Russian, but not Tajik. Sixty-nine percent of national libraries load in English but only 20 to 25 percent of the world's people speak English.

Almost every city in the world offers cybercafes or other commercial Internet access, but they cost average people in a developing city twice as much of their daily income as people in a developed city. In wealthiest cities between 2000 and 2005, cost of an hour of Internet access for average people dropped significantly, from 26 percent of daily income to 7 percent. The cost of going online fell as average income rose. In many developing cities, however, cost of going online didn't fall as dramatically, nor did incomes rise as fast. People in those cities spent 40 percent of their daily income to use the Internet in 2000 compared with 14 percent in 2005.

African nations are reforming their telecommunications policies, but surprisingly, the number of Internet hosts in Africa has declined. For several decades, African governments have been encouraged to reform their telecommunications by de-regulating the industry, privatizing telecommunications companies and introducing competition. The number of Internet hosts around the world has grown significantly since 1990, but the portion in Africa has declined because the governments have difficulty creating national infrastructure. In 1990, only 1.6 percent of the world's Internet hosts resided in Africa; by 2005, that number declined to 0.7 percent.
###

For more information, contact Howard at (206) 612-9911 (cell) or (206) 221-6532 or pnhoward@u.washington.edu.

A briefing booklet is available at www.wiareport.org

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Biotech

+ - New antibiotics for pathogenic attacks of bacteria->

Submitted by
allengineering
allengineering writes "A team of research directed by the pr. KIM Kyung-Gyu of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sungkyunkwan discovered the structure of the protein Rse B playing an essential part in the transmission of the signals of stresses resulting from the pathogenic attacks of bacteria. The article is been published in the edition of May of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the the USA (PNAS). This projection should make it possible to develop new antibiotics."
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