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Submission + - Why Nokia users come to hate Windows Phone (blogs.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tommi Ahonen has an article up about why long term Nokia users often buy Nokia's Windows phones but come to hate them if they don't realise to return them in time. Problems such as the phones lack of warning for battery failure during calls have been pointed out by some more independent reviewers, however Tommi points to a whole series of fundamental platform features from Bluetooth file transfer through lack of operator messaging features which aren't visible in the shop but come out after users get the phone home. Tommi also points to the build quality of Nokia's contract manufactured phones.

Part of the reason for leaving out Bluetooth file transfer is probably that operators hate it. With Microsoft's long term plan to use Skype to and other services to reduce the operators such as AT&T and Vodafone to simple bit pipes no different from a WiFi hotspot, they must following the “smile at Novell while we pull the trigger,” strategy and will do what it takes to keep operators on side in the meantime. Other omissions such as lack of Video MMS and USSD, however, already strike directly at existing operator services popular in many countries and are a definite harbinger of a future where Microsoft aims to follow their standard PC model and squeeze both operators and handset makers to pure commodities.

The overall package ends up seeming good in the shop but Tomi says "the situation gets far worse once you have lived with the Lumia for a little while." The realisation that, after 14 years of freedom, you can't use your own music for ringtones but need to buy them individually from Microsoft may be the last straw for the betrayed Nokia loyalist.


Submission + - Girls Around Me: An App Takes Creepy to a New Level (nytimes.com)

suraj.sun writes: Girls Around Me uses Foursquare(http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/30/girls-around-me-ios-app-takes-creepy-to-a-new-level/) to determine your location. It then scans for women in the area who have recently checked-in on the service. Once you identify a woman you’d like to talk to, one that inevitably has no idea you’re snooping on her, you can connect to her through Facebook, see her full name, profile photos and send her a message. When you sign up for the Girls Around Me application, you are asked to log in to Facebook, giving the service your personal information, too.

The app, which was first discovered by the blog, Cult of Mac(http://www.cultofmac.com/157641/this-creepy-app-isnt-just-stalking-women-without-their-knowledge-its-a-wake-up-call-about-facebook-privacy/), is built by a company called SMS Services O.o.o., which is based in Russia. Although the app maker knows a lot about its users, the company seems to have done a fairly good job of obscuring itself online.


Submission + - Google to Acquire Motorola Mobility (blogspot.com)

alexandre_ganso writes: "Larry Page on google blog: Since its launch in November 2007, Android has not only dramatically increased consumer choice but also improved the entire mobile experience for users. Today, more than 150 million Android devices have been activated worldwide—with over 550,000 devices now lit up every day—through a network of about 39 manufacturers and 231 carriers in 123 countries. That is why I am so excited today to announce that we have agreed to acquire Motorola."

It is easier to change the specification to fit the program than vice versa.