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Comment: Blood For the Blood God! (Score 1) 64

by mekkab (#49173287) Attached to: Games Workshop At 40: How They Brought D&D To Britain
And by 'Blood', I of course mean Money. ;) Those minis were not cheap. But Adeptus Titanicus was like a watered down Battletech, but in a good way. You spent more time playing and less time nose deep in rule books. And the mythos! They went deep and wide. A few years ago I was playing Blood Bowl online (soo much easier when the computer does the math for you) and last summer I got the Space Hulk video game for a song on steam (it's literally just the board game in your computer. Terrible video game, but awesome online game simulator).

I hope they stick around for a while longer.

Comment: Not the right way (Score 5, Insightful) 260

by jawtheshark (#49104551) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Parental Content Control For Free OSs?
The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.The right way is to talk to your kids about these things. Give examples of scams, tell them there is porn, there is violence, and always, always if they feel unsure about something they should talk to you (Mostly for scams, I'm pretty sure they'll handle porn. Hell, even weird porn isn't as bad as seeing ISIS chop someones head off). Software protection is just a crutch, the real protection is education and vigilance.

Comment: Re:It's a vast field.... (Score 5, Informative) 809

by jawtheshark (#49048419) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Portion of Developers Are Bad At What They Do?
There are also a plethora of "technically correct" answers. You could say: "I scp the file to your server", where you presume the server is secure, and ssh is secure, so the documents confidentiality is guaranteed. (Upload the file using https works as an answer too). Hey, just connect to the companies VPN and copy the file to a Samba share. Valid too!
The question of what kind of file it was, isn't even that dumb. I'm not familiar with PDF, but I could -for example- imagine there is a standard for encryption within PDF. Someone from with a document management background would most likely think of such solutions.

Comment: It's a vast field.... (Score 5, Informative) 809

by jawtheshark (#49048271) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Portion of Developers Are Bad At What They Do?
It's a vast field, and expertise of people is usually just a subset. I'm not even sure what the answer you you expected was, but I'd say: I'd use your public key to encrypt the file to you and then send it to you. Personally, I wouldn't know which commands to invoke to do this, but I know that's the theory.

So, should any developer know this? That is debatable. I've had very competent developers who had next to no clue about how DNS works. They could do their job just fine with that. Me? Personally, I'm not up to snuff with the finer points of SQL queries and all the joins that exists and when it makes sense to create an index, etc. Could I find out? Most likely, but I haven't had the need to recently.

The problem is, that you are mapping your knowlegde to "what people must know". I used to do that too, and I probably still do often enough. The DNS example above didn't come from nowhere: I had the case, and I was really thinking "how could such a competent person not know this", but then this person could probably enlighten me about dozens of things I don't know well enough.

It all comes down to what you define as "general knowgledge" for a developer should be and that is highly subjective.

TL;DR Hiring people is hard. Especially, technical people.

Comment: Re:minimal? (Score 1) 3

by jawtheshark (#49045901) Attached to: I wonder if I should file a bug with the Debian kernel team
I tried the following. On the affected machine, I created a DomU (Virtual Machine), assigned it 4CPUs, 4GB RAM and two disks. A root disk on which I installed a minimal debootstrapped wheezy, and an empty disk for the dd test. I made sure the VM boots from the affected kernel.

The bug doesn't happen in that context:

root@minimal:~# ssh root@othermachine "dd if=/dev/vg0/remote-lv" | dd of=/dev/xvdb1
root@hammerhead's password:
31457280+0 records in
31457280+0 records out
16106127360 bytes (16 GB) copied, 2156,62 s, 7,5 MB/s
31457280+0 records in
31457280+0 records out
16106127360 bytes (16 GB) copied, 2164.91 s, 7.4 MB/s
root@minimal:~# uname -a
Linux minimal 3.2.0-4-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 3.2.65-1+deb7u1 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Of course, the situation is not exactly the same in a virtualized environment.

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