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Comment: Re:Because Apple (Score 1) 292

by ExploHD (#45137445) Attached to: Irish Government May Close Apple's Biggest Tax Loophole

When a company does business in two different countries you often have overlapping and contradictory tax rules. Think of it as a compatibility problem. I have seen cases where tax rates go over 100%.

Not quite, since taxes paid on income earned overseas is deductible for a business and individual, but they must take the proper credits/deductions. For example, say you earned $30,000 in Somewhereakstan and the income tax rate is 10%, that means you will pay $3,000 in taxes to Somewhereakstan, leaving you with $27,000. You would then pay the taxes on that $27,000; since the US marginal tax rate is 15%, you would be paying $3604 in taxes to the US government*.

*your rates may vary

Communications

India To Send World's Last Telegram 205

Posted by Soulskill
from the unless-we-decide-to-get-away-from-PRISM dept.
New submitter afarhan writes "India will pull the plug on its 160-year-old telegram service on 14 July, this year. This will probably be the last telegram ever sent in the world. However, telegrams are still relevant in this vast country. More than 500 million people are still without access to a phone or Internet. For these people, telegram still remains the only digital communication available. 'At their peak in 1985, 60 million telegrams were being sent and received a year in India from 45,000 offices. Today, only 75 offices exist, though they are located in each of India's 671 districts through franchises. And an industry that once employed 12,500 people, today has only 998 workers.' In India, telegram is also considered a legal correspondence."
Books

Book Review: Locked Down: Information Security For Lawyers 43

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
benrothke writes "Had Locked Down: Information Security for Lawyers not been published by the American Bar Association (ABA) and 2 of its 3 authors not been attorneys; one would have thought the book is a reproach against attorneys for their obliviousness towards information security and privacy. In numerous places, the book notes that lawyers are often clueless when it comes to digital security. With that, the book is a long-overdue and valuable information security reference for anyone, not just lawyers." Read below for the rest of Ben's review.

Comment: Re:Capital versus Operating Expense (Score 1) 658

by ExploHD (#43648205) Attached to: Adobe Creative Suite Going Subscription-Only

The software is no longer an amortizable asset, but instead gets counted as overhead

Both are still a fixed cost that are used to calculate your markup. Either way you will be able to deduct the cost against your taxes; now you'll avoid the up-front expense and having to do deductions over it's useful life.

Comment: Re:Do what they do to hourly workers. (Score 1) 381

You presume that most companies give a crap about the law. Instead lawyers are hired and loopholes are discovered. You just quoted "...authorized by the employee in writing...". I guarantee that this provision is included within the employee handbook and a signature from the employee to agree to such provisions is almost always a condition of employment.

Hobby Lobby requires you to sign a binding arbitration clause, for employment, before they will even accept your application.

Books

Book Review: The New Digital Age 68

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen begin their new nonfiction book, The New Digital Age, with a rather bold pronouncement: 'The Internet is the largest experiment involving anarchy in history.' Subsequent chapters deal with how that experiment will alter life in decades to come, as more and more people around the world connect to the Internet via cheap mobile phones and other devices." Keep reading to see what Nerval's Lobster has to say about the book.
NASA

NASA Lets Us Watch the Sun Spin For 3 Years In 4 Minute Video 34

Posted by Soulskill
from the great-balls-of-fire dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Back in February 2010 NASA launched the Solar Dynamics Observatory–a 3-axis stabilized satellite and fully redundant spacecraft. The aim of the SDO is to monitor solar activity and see how that impacts space weather. As part of its observations, the SDO captures an image of the Sun every 12 seconds using the onboard Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, but varies those shots across 10 different wavelengths. NASA has now collected three years worth of image data from the SDO and has put together a video letting us see the Sun spin in all its glory." If you watch closely, you can see individual frames containing the Moon and Venus.

A CONS is an object which cares. -- Bernie Greenberg.

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