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Comment: Re:We'd never do such a thing (Score -1) 196

by Excelcior (#35854538) Attached to: Is Your Antivirus Made By the Chinese Government?

This really has me wondering what on earth your Linux users are doing with their workstations. 3D rendering? Intense scientific tasks? I mean, sure, storage = $, so I can see why you'd [possibly] want to keep an AV off for storage usage, but really, how many folks use their Linux workstations to their full potential? Nobody (+/-) seriously games on Linux, very few (any?) professionally use Linux for 3D animation... a Linux server will get worked like a horse, but a workstation? This just has me really curious. I mean, I trim everything back that I can (you'll never hear that odd drumbeat when any of my computers start up, for instance), but is a little protection really worth losing, when you'll never use the computers full potential anyway? Not trolling, I'm genuinely curious...

Comment: Re:And I pray the opposite... (Score -1, Flamebait) 735

by Excelcior (#35757642) Attached to: Tennessee Bill Helps Teachers Challenge Evolution

Idiot. An organism doesn't have to gain information to evolve. It just has to survive.

hmm... then how did anything increase into a more complex structure? Survival does not imply progression.
Evolution is a theory which has yet to be proven. From a non-religious point-of-view, there is absolutely no reason that evolution should be granted any merit beyond intelligent design. If, one day, a computer program gains self-awareness, would it be correct in arguing that it simply 'came to be', and it did not have an intelligent designer? Of course not. Why are all evolution vs. intelligent design debates always really just deism vs. atheism debates? Why can't anyone consider the possibility of intelligent design without asking 'who'? After all, evolution is simply a theory, not a proven fact. What should give it any further merit over any other not-disproven theory?

Full disclosure: I am a Bible thumper, and I have friends who believe in intelligent design who are atheists. Intelligent design does not predicate a deity.

Comment: Re:Oh and by the way..... (Score 4, Insightful) 125

by Excelcior (#35651556) Attached to: Are the Days of Individual Security Over?

Oh yeah, and don't forget www.somefringepoliticalview.com, and while we're at it, www.theopposingpoliticalparty.com, and hey, I've heard that religious teachings are bad for kids, so how about www.christianity.com and www.jewish.com....

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - one of the best quotes ever, from Benjamin Franklin, 1775.

Music

Universal Sends DMCA Takedown On 1980 Report 189

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the i-see-what-you-did-there dept.
An anonymous reader writes "For many, many years, every time some new technology has come along, the music industry has insisted that it's going to "kill" the industry. The player piano was supposed to kill live music. So was the radio. And, of course, every time this happens the press is willing to take the industry's word at face value. In 1980, the news program 20/20 posted a report all about how "home taping is killing music," with various recording industry execs insisting the industry was on its last legs unless something was done. Someone posted that 20/20 episode to YouTube a few years back, where it sat in obscurity until people noticed it a couple weeks ago. And suddenly, Universal Music issued a takedown notice for the show. Universal Music does not own 20/20, and there were only brief clips of music in the show. It appears the only reason for Universal to issue the takedown is that it doesn't want you seeing how badly it overreacted in the past."
Software

Opera Embraces Extensions For v.11 283

Posted by timothy
from the fat-lady-not-even-in-her-suit-yet dept.
dkd903 writes "Opera is one of the most solid browsers around. It is very fast, extremely customizable, and has a lot of functionality that others do not have. Opera is also a very strong supporter of Web standards; it was one of the first browsers to pass the ACID 3 test. However, Opera has always been confined to a relatively small user-base because of one critical thing — lack of extensions. Well, that is about to change — at least the extensions part. Today, it has been announced that Opera 11 will support extensions."

Comment: Re:Digital records are NOT a good thing (Score 2, Informative) 212

by Excelcior (#32937294) Attached to: Feds To Help Train 50,000 Health IT Workers

Working in the medical field myself, I can tell you that digitizing makes things faster, not slower. Back when it was all paper, you still had to take just as many notes and chart just as much stuff... you simply had to do it with a pen, and if you made a mistake, you had to cross it out in red, file it anyway, and go get a blank chart to copy it all onto. Then there was also the travel time aspect; when patient C was issued a new RX, you had to physically walk down to records to get the medication history and allergies report for the doctor. Now you just pull it up on the console in the operatory. All notes that are required now have always been required; the only difference is that now people can enter them with a keyboard, instead of needing good penmanship. Trust me, getting a records transfer from another clinic that does not use electronic records is always a pain; do you have any idea how poorly some nurses & assistants can write?!

Transportation

Men Cross 5 Mile Wide Lake In Inflatable Castle 17

Posted by samzenpus
from the dreams-do-come-true dept.
Jack Watkins, 25, and engineers Chris Hayes, 24, and Dave Sibley, 25, have succeeded in crossing Italy's Lake Garda in a huge, inflated bouncy castle. "Great Britain has such a great tradition as a seafaring nation and we really feel we have played no role at all in adding to this," admitted intrepid waterman Hayes. "That said, it was possibly the most fun we have ever had and we really never believed this most frivolous of dreams would ever be realized."

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