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Comment: Re:In related news (Score 1) 244

by HornWumpus (#48926941) Attached to: Dish Network Violated Do-Not-Call 57 Million Times

If you can't cash something in without crashing it's value it's not a good asset. Regardless of left pocket/right pocket issues. It's about maintaining diversified holdings for risk management.

If an insurance company tried to fund one of their annuity's reserves with company bonds they would slap the cuffs on them. Same should happen to everybody involved with SS.

Anybody with money in US bonds should be aware there is no functioning market for those bonds. The fed buys all excess at low interest rates. There is no market clearing price or interest for US debt. The market is rigged at best, a completely broken charade at worst. No prudent fund manager keeps more in US bonds then the US government requires.

Ponzi scheme is an accurate assessment.

Comment: Re:So to cicumvent the screen locker... (Score 1) 250

by HiThere (#48926901) Attached to: Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

So what you're saying is that there is old hardware that will only work if you make your system insecure. OK.

FWIW, I don't consider any system that allows remote sessions to be secure. Period. So you need to isolate such systems. (This isn't an argument that you shouldn't run such systems. Just that you should take precautions.)

As an aside, I think that allowing compressed files to be expanded with the execute bit set is also a security hazard...just one that's probably worth the cost. In most circumstances. (And hazard isn't the same as hole. Not quite.)

Comment: Re:A quote (Score 1) 341

by HiThere (#48926793) Attached to: Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

You are making the assumption that they didn't intend this result. Or at least that they weren't aware that this would be the result. I find that quite dubious. As you say, it was obvious by inspection

OTOH, what would have been the result of disbanding the Iraqi army? You've created a bunch of people trained in violence suddenly out of work. I'm not convinced that it would have resulted in a better situation, though clearly it would be a different situation. And long term occupation would also have tremendous probabilities for disaster.

The real mistake was deciding to invade. After that I don't think there was a decent exit strategy...not if you are counting human cost. But this *must* have been obvious ahead of time, so clearly that wasn't their consideration. Who benefited? Who expected to benefit? How? It strikes me as a clearly political decision with only political gains.

Comment: Re:When everyone is guilty... (Score 1) 341

by HiThere (#48926679) Attached to: Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

True, there also needs to be a maximum length of any given law which includes in the length all other laws cited by reference.

I also think there needs to be a reasonable test for intelligibility. It's not right that everyone should understand every law, that's an impossibily high bar, but an average high school senior should. And at minimum should be able to. I can't think of a simple way of phrasing that test though that isn't of the form "Take a bunch of average high school seniors and have them write an essay about what the law means, and what it means is the intersection of what they claim it means", and that's also a poor idea, because it would eliminate everything...but I can't think of an objective "average understanding" evaluator.

Comment: Re:not the point (Score 1) 250

by operagost (#48926367) Attached to: Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure

Security features and policies are two different things. If you can solve a vulnerability with a feature, you do it. Policies are for things that don't have a technological solution, like social engineering. People should lock their workstations, but they don't always. Instead of remarking on how lazy or dumb they are, Microsoft created a solution 22 years ago.

Also, policy doesn't fix this scenario with a shared computer: a malicious employee, instead of logging off after his shift, runs a fake logon screen malware to collect credentials from other users. Those other users may be privileged or, even if unprivileged, have their identities be used as cover in later attacks.

Comment: Re:In related news (Score 1) 244

by HornWumpus (#48925505) Attached to: Dish Network Violated Do-Not-Call 57 Million Times

Pretending that a huge block of bonds are an asset is standard answer from the 'SS is healthy liars brigade.'

IIRC Productive midwest farmland bounced between 1k$/acre and 2K$ for decades. Last I looked it was $4K. Farmland isn't the same as residential land. Farmland is valued at present value of future earnings, just like any other productive asset. Future earnings is always a guess. Current investors have inflation expectations.

Gravity is a myth, the Earth sucks.

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