Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:its why devs cringe. (Score 1) 155

by squiggleslash (#47580305) Attached to: PHP Finally Getting a Formal Specification

FWIW, in answer to your "Can't speak for PHP" thing, PHP has, for reasons known only to the person that implemented, two incompatible dictionary type structures, objects and arrays. They're both equivalent, and because they're not compatible an enormous number of developers of third party libraries and frameworks feel the need to implement a "Give me it as an object"/"Give me it as an associative array" parameter onto any function that returns one or the other.

And lest you think "Wait! It's obvious squiggy! The associative array is obviously using hashtables and the other is typed!", that's... not (quite) the case. If PHP is optimizing anything with objects at some level, it's certainly not doing so based upon "static-after-parsing-app" set of possible member names: you can convert each to the other form with a simple cast, and you $some_array[$expression] has an object equivalent of $some_object->{$expression}. If it isn't using hashtables for objects too, then it's probably doing something even more braindead.

Comment: Re:Formal specifications are pretty useless for th (Score 1) 155

by squiggleslash (#47578837) Attached to: PHP Finally Getting a Formal Specification

Unless we're using "formal specification" in a form uncommonly known in the English language, ANSI C (hint hint) does, indeed, have a formal specification or three.

In fact, that's part of the problem with C. ANSI spent a lot of time trying to make their specification so generic it could be implemented on all kinds of different hardware, leaving us with a language that means virtually every bit of "obvious what it does" readable code can be re-interpreted by every optimizing compiler to mean something completely different. A big problem, considering C's system programming roots.

Comment: HYPE THE MERCH (Score 0) 81

by Thud457 (#47575673) Attached to: Nevada Construction Project Could Be Tesla/Panasonic Gigafactory
You fools, this is happy fun reeducation camp #1 for Muskianity. This is where people judged to be unfit to join his new world order on Mars will be forced to build hyperloop components and cybernetic carbon sequestration modules. Expect the stolen NASA Space Shuttle to turn up there.

A recent invention by a noted inventor, 49-year-old scientist Dean Kamen, is generating excitement and mystery. "IT", is so extraordinary, that it has drawn the attention of technology visionaries Jeff Bezos (Amazon) and Steve Jobs (Apple) and the investment dollars of pre-eminent Silicon Valley venture capitalist John Doerr, and Credit Suisse First Boston, among others. Those who have seen the two prototypes have been variously amazed, delighted, surprised and awestruck. Jeff Bezos is reported to have snorted uncontrollably (his laugh sounds like a pig snorting).

Kamen, who was just awarded the National Medal of Technology (the highest such award in the US) has been called "a combination of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison". John Doerr, of Kleiner Perkins Caulfield and Byers, the noted VC who funded the launch of companies like Sun, Lotus, Compaq and Netscape, says that he had been sure that he wouldn't see the development of anything in his lifetime as important as the World Wide Web - until he saw IT. Another investor, Credit Suisse First Boston, expects Kamen's invention to make more money in its first year than any start-up in history, predicting Kamen will be worth more in five years than Bill Gates. Jobs told Kamen that IT would be as significant as the PC (high praise indeed from Jobs, who feels that he originated the PC).

Comment: Re:Please don't take my nerd card (Score 2) 259

by jawtheshark (#47574201) Attached to: How long ago did you last assemble a computer?
Edsger W. Dijkstra was stupid?

You can do computer science just with paper and pen. That is entirely feasible and totally common in any computer science curriculum at any halfway decent university. Oh, you thought that computer science = programming. Well, yeah, no... it isn't and technically you can program without a computer too. You just can't run your programs.

Comment: Re:Confusing position (Score 1) 504

by Archangel Michael (#47570021) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

Economy Recovering (For Wall Street, mainstreet still at unacceptable unemployment)
Debt Going down (Sequestration, in spite of horrors by Liberals about "government shutdown')
Pulling out of wars (while Russia invades multiple countries annexing them at will, Hamas/Israel, Syria, Libya, Iraq ..... )
Health Care for all (Not watching the news about Federal Case regarding Fed Exchange ...)

How about Open Boarder Invasion from the south, causing massive harm to the environmentally threatened South West? (Check)
IRS Lying in attacks against conservatives (check, check, check and ... "Not a smidgeon of corruption" .. check)
Support of Islam at every step, while ignoring the plight of Christians (and others) world wide. (check)
Golfing and fundraising instead of actually doing his job (Check)
Another Multimillion dollar Vacation (check)

And the "other guy" (Romney) was mocked for saying exactly what is happening today in Ukraine. Obama is the pigeon on the chessboard of the world, strutting around knocking pieces over.

Comment: Re:Confusing position (Score 0) 504

by Archangel Michael (#47569039) Attached to: Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step

Yes.

It may have been necessary to break the barriers, but at some point, the barriers are gone, and the only thing holding people back are the people themselves. There is NO REASON why black people can't succeed in America. After all, we have an unqualified "black" (half) man as President, simply because we're still threatened by "Racist" reverse slur being tossed out. After six years in office, he still can't seem to figure out when it is his fault when the shit hits the fan. I mean, still holding "race" or "GWB" or those "evil Republicans" is pretty lame leadership technique.

Work expands to fill the time available. -- Cyril Northcote Parkinson, "The Economist", 1955

Working...