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Biotech

Group Tries To Open Source Seeds 100

Posted by samzenpus
from the lettuce-for-linux dept.
jenwike writes The Open Source Seed Initiative is a passionate group that wants to ensure their seeds are never patented, but making sure seeds are free for use and distribution by anyone isn't as easy as you might think. Part of the equation are plant characteristics, like an extended head on lettuce — is that an invention? Or, would you argue that it is the product of the collective sharing of material that improves the whole crop over time? In this report, one farmer says, "If you're not exchanging germplasm, you're cutting your own throat."

Comment: Re:Personalized privacy policies? (Score 1, Insightful) 42

by Errol backfiring (#48017691) Attached to: EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

13. Shared data. anyone lured to our servers agrees by uploading personal data to Google cloud that any dick pics are both hackable and for sale to the highest bidder.

There, fixed that for you. You don't have to be a subscriber to be stalked by Google. There's no consent. Google is the major company that made internet browsing without adblockers downright impossible.

Cellphones

When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone 175

Posted by Soulskill
from the looking-forward-to-jailbreaking-my-breadmaker dept.
The Atlantic is running an article about how "smart" devices are starting to see everyday use in many people's home. The authors say this will fundamentally change the concept of what it means to own and control your possessions. Using smartphones as an example, they extrapolate this out to a future where many household items are dependent on software. Quoting: These phones come with all kinds of restrictions on their possible physical capabilities. You may not take them apart. Depending on the plan, not all software can be downloaded onto them, not every device can be tethered to them, and not every cell phone network can be tapped. "Owning" a phone is much more complex than owning a plunger. And if the big tech players building the wearable future, the Internet of things, self-driving cars, and anything else that links physical stuff to the network get their way, our relationship to ownership is about to undergo a wild transformation. They also suggest that planned obsolescence will become much more common. For example, take watches: a quality dumbwatch can last decades, but a smartwatch will be obsolete in a few years.

The idle man does not know what it is to enjoy rest.

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