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+ - Asheron's Call to end active development, Turbine to release server software->

Submitted by _KiTA_
_KiTA_ (241027) writes "Asheron's Call, one of the longest running modern era MMOs at 15 years, will have one final monthly update on March 4th, whereupon the game (alongside Asheron's Call 2) will be placed in Mothball — going free to play for existing accounts, with only bugfix and balance updates to be expected.

However, at the same time, Turbine's going out with a bang — adding a Disgaea-like character reincarnation system, LOTRO style evolving weapons, and a fanservice-filled bonus dungeon for the remaining (and returning) faithful players.

Oh, and they're planning on releasing the game's servers, client, utilities, and art assets for free. Similar to how Ultima Online spawned a host of unofficial and technically illegal 3rd party servers, Turbine is going to officially allow 3rd party servers now that the game is being retired. There are also increasing rumors that Turbine might be working on an Asheron's Call 3 or AC Reboot, as well."

Link to Original Source

+ - Group Thinks Anonymity Should Be Baked Into the Internet Itself Using Tor

Submitted by Hugh Pickens DOT Com
Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "David Talbot writes at MIT Technology review that engineers on the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), an informal organization of engineers that changes Internet code and operates by rough consensus, have asked the architects of Tor to consider turning the technology into an Internet standard. If widely adopted, such a standard would make it easy to include the technology in consumer and business products ranging from routers to apps and would allow far more people to browse the Web without being identified by anyone who might be spying on Internet traffic. The IETF is already working to make encryption standard in all web traffic. Stephen Farrell believes that forging Tor into a standard that interoperates with other parts of the Internet could be better than leaving Tor as a separate tool that requires people to take special action to implement. “I think there are benefits that might flow in both directions,” says Farrell. “I think other IETF participants could learn useful things about protocol design from the Tor people, who’ve faced interesting challenges that aren’t often seen in practice. And the Tor people might well get interest and involvement from IETF folks who’ve got a lot of experience with large-scale systems.” Andrew Lewman, executive director of Tor, says the group is considering it. “We’re basically at the stage of ‘Do we even want to go on a date together?’ It’s not clear we are going to do it, but it’s worth exploring to see what is involved. It adds legitimacy, it adds validation of all the research we’ve done.”"

+ - No, the Tesla Model S Doesn't Pollute More Than A SUV-> 1

Submitted by thecarchik
thecarchik (1520545) writes "In an exhaustive 6,500-word article on the financial website Seeking Alpha, analyst Nathan Weiss lays out a case that the latest Tesla Model S actually has higher effective emissions than most large SUVs of both the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and smog-producing pollutants like sulfur dioxide.

This is absolutely false.

Virtually all electric car advocate agree that when toting up the environmental pros and cons of electric cars, it's only fair to include powerplant emissions. When this has been done previously, the numbers have still favored electric cars. The Union of Concerned Scientists, for example, concluded in a 2012 report, "Electric vehicles charged on the power grid have lower global warming emissions than the average gasoline-based vehicle sold today.

Working through everyone of Weiss' conclusions may show a higher emissions rate than Tesla's published numbers but in no way does a Model S pollute the amounts even close to an SUV."

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+ - Kenneth Appel Remembered For Four Color Theorem->

Submitted by mikejuk
mikejuk (1801200) writes "Kenneth Appel (1932-2013) together with Wolfgang Haken, proved the four color theorem and broke new ground in using a computer to complete the proof. For the first time a computer played a major role in proving a major mathematical theorem.This was not a proof that was liked by all mathematicians. The use of the computer resulted in a proof that could not be checked by an unaided human. It was a huge shock for many mathematicians at the time to have to move over and allow a computer to take part in mathematics. There was a feeling at the time, and perhaps there still is, that the proof was a temporary matter and soon a real mathematician would step up and provide a "real" proof. Even today many mathematicians have their reservations about the proof and there have been attempts to simplify it, but so far they all involve computers. Mathematicians are still searching for something that would look more like an elementary proof.
Appel and Haken's proof may be the most controversial in mathematics but it also put the computer into pure mathematics.
Kenneth Appel died on April 19, 2013 at the age of 80."

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Comment: Re:Duh, it's evidence (Score 3, Insightful) 218

I echo somebody else's comment above that comparing this to a school board is disingenuous. A court order is far different than a school board going fishing.

For this case, a court order for information from a person's web account should have a way to subpoena the information necessary without requiring disclosure of passwords. That's reasonable, just like how with a court order a suspect must provide the keys and/or open up a safe on their property if such is specified in a search warrant. It's similar. The problem comes that with some models of computer security, that information is not available without a privacy violation (giving up a password). It's quite a conundrum.

That being said, in this case (and many others) I'm shocked that Facebook (& friends) don't have some type of "legal request mechanism" that would work as a "backdoor" for this type of thing. They can reset passwords and such, so it's hard to believe they don't have a mechanism to handle requests from legal systems for a history of posts, images, etc. The law should always require a warrant to access it if it's not publicly posted, but other than that, I'm surprised it isn't already there.

Comment: Re:Simple (Score 4, Interesting) 515

by Erioll (#41442005) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Actual Best-in-Show For Free Anti Virus?

Not the same thing IMO. A great amount of malware requires that the user does something. So "download our .exe and ignore the security prompts!" is still a very large section of things, and has nothing to do with a secure OS or not. Programs running as a user has as many rights as a user themselves. That's what most virus software is for: detecting that you're trying to run something that's "bad" but it's not exploiting security holes to do so. It's just running with "full trust" just like any other program on your machine, and behaving badly.

Iphone

+ - "Cyber Illusionist" Marco Tempest->

Submitted by bLanark
bLanark (123342) writes "The BBC have a piece about illusionist Marco Tempest who uses technology to generate magical illusions. As he says in the interview unlike most magicians and illusionists he shares his techniques in an act that he calls "open sorcery." The techniques include using iPhone apps, and high-speed digital cameras. There is a growing band of people using and contributing to the field."
Link to Original Source
Communications

How Killing the Internet Helped Revolutionaries 90

Posted by Soulskill
from the anything-that-gets-people-off-twitter-has-to-help dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In a widely circulated American Political Science Association conference paper, Yale scholar Navid Hassanpour argues that shutting down the internet made things difficult for sustaining a centralized revolutionary movement in Egypt. But, he adds, the shutdown actually encouraged the development of smaller revolutionary uprisings at local levels where the face-to-face interaction between activists was more intense and the mobilization of inactive lukewarm dissidents was easier. In other words, closing down the internet made the revolution more diffuse and more difficult for the authorities to contain." As long as we're on the subject, reader lecheiron points out news of research into predicting revolutions by feeding millions of news articles into a supercomputer and using word analysis to chart national sentiment. So far it's pretty good at predicting things that have already happened, but we should probably wait until it finds something new before contacting Hari Seldon.
Technology

+ - Supercomputer predicts revolution->

Submitted by lecheiron
lecheiron (2441744) writes "A study, based on millions of articles, charted deteriorating national sentiment ahead of the recent revolutions in Libya and Egypt.

While the analysis was carried out retrospectively, scientists say the same processes could be used to anticipate upcoming conflict.

The study's information was taken from a range of sources, then the information was analysed for two main types of information: mood — whether the article represented good news or bad news, and location — where events were happening and the location of other participants in the story."

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Comment: Re:Awesome. (Score 2) 168

by Erioll (#37220386) Attached to: PS3 <em>Counter-Strike</em> To Support Keyboard and Mouse

I have not bought ANY fps games on consoles because of this issue (closest is metroid, and that at least had lock-on, and such, and so was OK). And there ARE exclusives, so no, I can't necessarily play some games, so the company is losing money because of this.

If you want to put out separate matches for each type, then fine, have you able to set up matches with controller-only, K+M only, or mixed. But don't just cut it out entirely. They ARE losing sales from this policy.

Possessions increase to fill the space available for their storage. -- Ryan

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