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Submission + - SPAM: Scientists Take Huge Step Toward Universal Flu Vaccine

Offsh0reOn writes: A universal flu vaccine — one that provides immunity against every strain of the influenza virus for multiple years — is the holy grail of flu research. It would be a medical breakthrough on the order of penicillin, with the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. And scientists just got one crucial step closer to making it a reality.
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Submission + - Open Hardware Team successfully replicating Tesla inventions->

lkcl writes: A small team has successfully overcome the usual barrier to replicating one of Tesla's inventions (death threats and intimidation) by following Open Hardware development practices, encouraging other teams world-wide to replicate their work. Their FAQ and several other reports help explain that the key is Schumann resonance: "tuning" the device to the earth's own EM field and harvesting it as useful electricity. Whilst it looks like it's going mainstream, the real question is: why has it taken this long, and why has an Open Hardware approach succeeded where other efforts have not?
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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Personal source control options?

McLae writes: I am looking for personal source control options. Here are the constraints:

Must run on Windows PC. Not server, just regular PC. Win 7 or win 8+.

Low cost or free. ( less than $100) (Rules out VSS)

Easy to install. No need to configure ports or firewall settings.

Self contained. No server or network access required.

Must include database. (Like Darby?) No separate database install.



I had an application like this 20 years ago that ran on DOS. What are the current options?

Submission + - There Is No Honeybee Crisis-> 1

iONiUM writes: An article today claims that there is no longer any Honeybee crises, and that the deaths of the Honeybees previously was a one-off, or possibly non-cyclical occurance (caused by neonics or nature — the debate is still out). The data used is that from Stats Canada which claims "the number of honeybee colonies is at a record high [in Canada]." Globally, the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization says that "worldwide bee populations have rebounded to a record high." However, many corporations and pro-environment groups have much to gain by creating a panic about Honeybee deaths, and as such continue to publish stories claiming the situation is dire.
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Comment Re: They're not going to arrest him! (Score 4, Insightful) 312

Only the 2nd should be illegal. There is an increasing trend (decades I mean, if not longer) to criminalize what "might" occur, rather than just criminalizing actual harm. Here's a summary of what I "think" should be the laws: Shooting somebody - illegal Just carrying a gun, openly or not - not illegal. Recklessly shooting into the woods - maybe The last one's the hard part, but it slips so easily into "pre-crime" that it gets weird, and makes people afraid to do anything that "might" end up being a crime, though nobody was hurt. Thus this issue: Putting a gun on a drone - legal Shooting somebody with a gun on a drone - DEFINITELY ILLEGAL All IMO.

Submission + - Meet MUMPS, the Programming Language for Healthcare->

citadrianne writes: An ICU patient is monitored and assessed according to 12 different variables. These include such measurements as body temperature, heart rate, blood oxygenation, blood pH, and others. Together, they're used to formulate a quantitative answer to the question, "How bad is it, doc?" Many of these physiological signs are measured in real-time via electrodes and like a billion different varieties of catheter. Add to it barrages of lab tests done multiple times per day per patient and the need for 20 or so clinicians (per patient) to have access to all of this data, and the result is very a deep data problem.

Multiply that data problem by hundreds of thousands of patients.

This is the fundamental problem that the programming language MUMPS (sometimes called just "M"), or the Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System, aims to solve. To its proponents, MUMPS allows for a one of a kind synthesis of programming and database management, while to to its detractors, it's a bizarre anachronism with little connection to the evolution and innovation taking place elsewhere in programming. Probably to most people that do things with computers, MUMPS/M is poorly understood, at best, and more likely to be completely unknown.

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Submission + - Faith-Based Intellectual Property

An anonymous reader writes: A new article by Mark Lemley (a law professor at Stanford) makes the case that today's intellectual property law is based on quasi-religious beliefs rather than factual data. From the abstract: "The traditional justification for intellectual property (IP) rights has been utilitarian. We grant exclusive rights because we think the world will be a better place as a result. But what evidence we have doesn’t justify IP rights. Rather than following the evidence and questioning strong IP rights, more and more scholars have begun to retreat from evidence toward what I call faith-based IP, justifying IP as a moral end in itself rather than on the basis of how it affects the world. I argue that these moral claims are ultimately unpersuasive and a step backward in a rational society." It's a very interesting read free from legal jargon, but citing a lot of studies about what is actually known of the effects of intellectual property laws on creative production.

Submission + - Seed from ancient extinct plant planted and brought back to life

schwit1 writes: Israeli scientists have successfully gotten a 2000-year-old seed of an extinct date plant to grow and now reproduce.

Methuselah sprouted back in 2005, when agriculture expert Solowey germinated his antique seed. It had been pulled from the remains of Masada, an ancient fortification perched on a rock plateau in southern Israel, and at the time, no one could be sure that the plant would thrive. But he has, and his recent reproductive feat helps prove just how well he’s doing.

For a while, the Judean date palm was the sole representative of his kind: Methuselah’s variety was reportedly wiped out around 500 A.D. But Solowey has continued to grow date palms from ancient seeds discovered in the region, and she tells National Geographic that she is “trying to figure out how to plant an ancient date grove.” Doing so would allow researchers to better understand exactly what earlier peoples of the region were eating and how it tasted.

Submission + - MuseScore 2.0 Released->

rDouglass writes: MuseScore, the open source desktop application for music notation, has released MuseScore 2.0 for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. This release represents the culmination of four years of development, including technical contributions from over 400 people. In addition to a completely new UI, top features include linked parts (good for pieces with many instruments), guitar tablature, flexible chord symbols, and fret diagrams. The program integrates directly with the MuseScore.com online library of scores, and music written with the application can be displayed and played using the MuseScore mobile app.
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Comment Re:Two options (Score 1) 466

I agree, find SOME way to get that onto a local network, and that will be BY FAR the easiest way to do things. Maybe dig up an old ISA 10Mbps card on Ebay or something, as the original poster suggested if you can't find a suitable PCMCIA card.

And combining with something said above, it's not difficult to find a usb->serial port device/cable (it's not just pin-out, so it's a device, not merely a cable). Pretty cheap. Same with a null-modem cable. Both together should run you in the range of $20-$40 or less. Then hook it directly up to whatever computer you want that has a USB cable, and get a terminal emulator (plenty available) and transfer.

It CAN be done, but I'm with the parent that windows file sharing via ethernet is going to be the fastest by far.

Comment Re: Maybe Putin could help (Score 1) 155

From the link:

Small earthquakes keep big ones from happening. Each magnitude level represents about 31.6 times more energy released. It takes 32 magnitude 3s to equal the energy released in a magnitude 4, 1,000 magnitude 3s to equal a magnitude 5 and a billion magnitude 3s to equal a single magnitude 9. So while a small quake may temporarily ease stress on a fault line, it does not prevent a large temblor.

This basically says "no effect either way" from my non-expert reading of it. Also, small quakes cause no damage. If fracking causes damaging quakes, then that's an issue. It's like saying "that wind from the desk fan is damaging me, like a hurricane would!" Umm, no it isn't. If it doesn't hit the threshold, you're being an idiot.

Submission + - Why Microsoft skipped Windows 9

Bizzeh writes: Microsoft may not be everybody's favorite company, but they are the kings of backwards compatibility. When testing what was Windows 9 (and is now Windows 10). It seems like they came across some compatibility issues from the Windows 9x days. Mentioned by Mikko Hypponen on twitter (https://twitter.com/mikko/status/517358472715710465), quite a lot of products test the version string with "indexOf("windows 9")". Using searchcode, we can see what he means. https://searchcode.com/?q=if(v...

Submission + - Forest Service clamps down on free speech

schwit1 writes: The U.S. Forest Service has instituted rules requiring journalists to get a permit before they can take pictures or videos on federal land. The Bill of Rights is such an inconvenient thing.

Under rules being finalized in November, a reporter who met a biologist, wildlife advocate or whistleblower alleging neglect in any of the nation’s 100 million acres of wilderness would first need special approval to shoot photos or videos even on an iPhone. Permits cost up to $1,500, says Forest Service spokesman Larry Chambers, and reporters who don’t get a permit could face fines up to $1,000.

First Amendment advocates say the rules ignore press freedoms and are so vague they’d allow the Forest Service to grant permits only to favored reporters shooting videos for positive stories.

The fascist nature of these new rules is revealed by this quote near the end of the article:

[T]he Forest Service is giving its supervisors discretion to decide whether a news outlet’s planned video or photo shoots would meet the Wilderness Act’s goals. “If you were engaged on reporting that was in support of wilderness characteristics, that would be permitted,” [said Liz Close, the Forest Service's acting wilderness director].

But if you are reporting on something the Forest Service disagrees with they obviously believe they have the right to deny you a permit to film or videotape.

Submission + - Microsoft goes cross-platform with a universal keyboard for Android and iOS

DroidJason1 writes: Microsoft has released a new keyboard that is designed to work with all of your devices. The Universal Mobile Keyboard, as Microsoft calls it, works on Android, iPad, iPhone, and Windows. Microsoft is taking the "one experience for everything in your life" mantra quite seriously. The keyboard connects to devices via Bluetooth, and works with Windows 8 and higher; Windows RT; Apple iOS 6 and higher; and Android 4 or higher. It features an OS switch that lets you change from one operating system to another while maintaining a fully functional keyboard. The keyboard cover has an integrated stand that can easily be detached too. The keyboard hits retail in October for $79.95.

Submission + - Intel releases Edison: hugely powerful x86 board almost as small as an SD card->

szczys writes: Intel is upping their bid for a place at the power-efficient, yet powerful device table. This Edison board features an x86 based SoC running at 100 MHz. The footprint measures 35.5mm x 25.0 mm and offers a 70-pin connector to break out 40 pins for add-on hardware.
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