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+ - Et tu Laura Poitras?->

Submitted by Nicola Hahn
Nicola Hahn (1482985) writes "Recently Laura Poitras, the documentary filmmaker who directed the movie Citizenfour, spoke with the Danish media outlet NRC Handelsblad. Near the end of her interview she told NRC:

"I think certainly a change in consciousness has come after Snowden. Google's servers are secure: that's a big change. This protects the privacy of people. Apple brings a secure phone on the market, that frustrates the FBI again"

There are recurring themes if one analyzes the basic talking points of Greenwald, Poitras, and Snowden: that corporations were victimized by a government run amok, that we can safeguard our civil liberties by going out and getting the latest app. Is it any surprise that all three of the above people are linked somehow to a man named Pierre Omidyar? Could a form of subtle manipulation be at work? Hints of betrayal?"

Link to Original Source

+ - Defending Democracy: Government Whistleblowing in the Digital Age->

Submitted by Erik Bird
Erik Bird (2972117) writes "A link to a panel discussion in support of Chelsea Manning. Panelists include NSA whistleblower Thomas Drake, FBI whistleblower Mike German as well as Chelsea Manning’s new defense council Nancy Hollander and Vincent Ward. The panelists discuss the future of American government accountability, democratic information sharing, whistleblowing and the prospects for Chelsea Manning’s appeal."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Vint Cerf: Salesman (Score 1) 103

by Erik Bird (#46539481) Attached to: NSA General Counsel Insists US Companies Assisted In Data Collection
I worked at the NSA a couple years and saw Vint Cerf talk at a meeting at the NSA in 2009. Cerf was being asked for his opinion on using hadoop at the NSA. One thing he did say was that he was there as a salesman, to sell google products to the NSA. Also the google tech talk "The Secret History of Silicon Valley" is illuminating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Comment: Vint Cerf salesman (Score 1) 103

by Erik Bird (#46539433) Attached to: NSA General Counsel Insists US Companies Assisted In Data Collection
I worked at the NSA a couple years and saw Vint Cerf talk at a meeting at the NSA in 2009. Cerf was being asked for his opinion on using hadoop at the NSA. One thing he did say was that he was there as a salesman, to sell google products to the NSA. Also the google tech talk "The Secret History of Silicon Valley" is illuminating. https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Comment: : How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Google (Score 1) 62

by Erik Bird (#45689223) Attached to: Why the NSA Piggybacks On Consumer Tracking
A recent foia request by propublica for emails between NSA employees and employees of the National Geographic Channel over a time period that the TV station had aired a friendly documentary on the NSA resulted in the following response from the NSA (the supercomputing powerhouse) "There's no central method to search an email at this time with the way our records are set up, unfortunately.... [the system is] a little antiquated and archaic." A former employee of the department of labor statistics said that the department's entire data set fits on a single hard drive. Note that in the 90’s the IRS was still using vacuum tube technology. The National Security Agency in the last couple of years just started building modern data centers in Utah. There is abundant evidence provided by the Thomas Drake prosecution and the 9-11 commission report that information management is a problem in the intelligence community. Does google have better information management technology than the NSA? If corporations do have better data on the U.S. economy and population than the U.S. government doesn't it make sense to be governed by these corporations, ie government sachs? Is it not true that he who has the information has the power? And of course doesn't that create a clear “moral hazard”and “regulatory capture” situation as the corporations are regulated by the gov? Regulatory capture is basically when the cops and judges are owned, the book "13 bankers" goes over the issue for wall street. Isn’t corporate control of government part of what occupy wall street activists protested?

Comment: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Google (Score 1) 509

by Erik Bird (#45681061) Attached to: NSA Head Asks How To Spy Without Collecting Metadata
A recent foia request by propublica for emails between NSA employees and employees of the National Geographic Channel over a time period that the TV station had aired a friendly documentary on the NSA resulted in the following response from the NSA (the supercomputing powerhouse) "There's no central method to search an email at this time with the way our records are set up, unfortunately.... [the system is] a little antiquated and archaic." A former employee of the department of labor statistics said that the department's entire data set fits on a single hard drive. Note that in the 90’s the IRS was still using vacuum tube technology. The National Security Agency in the last couple of years just started building modern data centers in Utah. There is abundant evidence provided by the Thomas Drake prosecution and the 9-11 commission report that information management is a problem in the intelligence community. Does google have better information management technology than the NSA? If corporations do have better data on the U.S. economy and population than the U.S. government doesn't it make sense to be governed by these corporations, ie government sachs? Is it not true that he who has the information has the power? And of course doesn't that create a clear “moral hazard”and “regulatory capture” situation as the corporations are regulated by the gov? Regulatory capture is basically when the cops and judges are owned, the book "13 bankers" goes over the issue for wall street. Isn’t corporate control of government part of what occupy wall street activists protested?

Comment: U.S. News and Propaganda (Score 1) 376

by Erik Bird (#45599849) Attached to: Fearing Government Surveillance, US Journalists Are Self-Censoring
If the the major U.S. news organizations promoted journalists for writing insightful, well researched articles on U.S.-middle east relations there would be plenty journalists writing about it whether or not they were surveilled by the NSA. The mainstream media (propaganda) organizations are more to blame for censorship in the U.S. than the NSA. Take a look at the problems faced by Harvard and University of Chicago professors publishing their work on "The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N294FMDok98

Comment: how I lurned to stop worrying and love google (Score 1) 153

by Erik Bird (#45448301) Attached to: How Big Companies Can Hamper the Surveillance Infrastructure
A recent foia request by propublica for emails between NSA employees and employees of the National Geographic Channel over a time period that the TV station had aired a friendly documentary on the NSA resulted in the following response from the NSA (the supercomputing powerhouse) "There's no central method to search an email at this time with the way our records are set up, unfortunately.... [the system is] a little antiquated and archaic." A former employee of the department of labor statistics said that the department's entire data set fits on a single hard drive. Note that in the 90’s the IRS was still using vacuum tube technology. The National Security Agency in the last couple of years just started building modern data centers in Utah. There is abundant evidence provided by the Thomas Drake prosecution and the 9-11 commission report that information management is a problem in the intelligence community. Does google have better information management technology than the NSA? If corporations do have better data on the U.S. economy and population than the U.S. government doesn't it make sense to be governed by these corporations, ie government sachs? Is it not true that he who has the information has the power? And of course doesn't that create a clear “moral hazard”and “regulatory capture” situation as the corporations are regulated by the gov? Regulatory capture is basically when the cops and judges are owned, the book "13 bankers" goes over the issue for wall street. Isn’t corporate control of government part of what occupy wall street activists protested?

Comment: Re:It's not an 'error', it's a 'lie' (Score 2) 296

Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S. citizen, was executed by the U.S. government in 2010 without being tried in a U.S. court. You don't have to be convicted of anything to be executed by the USG. I believe Anwar was primarily a propagandist for al-Qaida, al-Qaida is primarily a U.S. defined organization. Because al-Qaida is a U.S. defined organization it gives the U.S. a lot of power in deciding who is considered a member. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anwar_al-Awlaki http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/22/white-house-drone-strikes-us-citizens

+ - National Security Blog->

Submitted by feynmanfan1
feynmanfan1 (1803416) writes "I've set up a blog at natsecurityeb.blogspot.com to post info relevant to U.S. national security. I collect links and data relevant to understanding how U.S. intelligence agencies work and what their motivations and influences are. So far I've posted about issues surrounding the prosecution of Thomas Drake, who is being sued for attempting to expose mismanagement in the IT at the National Security Agency. Also a summary of info in the Washington post 'Top Secret America' series. Other issues explored are how religion creeps into U.S. military intelligence, what influence the Israel lobby, AIPAC, has on U.S. foreign policy and how wikileaks might help."
Link to Original Source

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