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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 12 declined, 5 accepted (17 total, 29.41% accepted)

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Submission + - 'World Shaker' Crossbreeds Processor With Memory C (

Eric Smalley writes: "Processors include a small amount of cache memory, which reduces the number of times the processor has to fetch data from main memory, but Venray goes further. It puts the processor and main memory on the same chip. It’s called processor-in-memory, or PIM, and it’s not exactly a new idea. Fish and others have been pursuing the idea for decades. But its time may finally have come.

In today's world, biomedical research and other Big Data applications that juggle enormous amounts of information are butting up against that memory wall, and if we’re to achieve personalized medicine --" where we tailor drugs and other treatments to an analysis of an individual’s genetic makeup --" we need chips that can push through that wall."

Submission + - Chinese Crunch Human Genome With Videogame Chips

Eric Smalley writes: "The world’s largest genome sequencing center once needed four days to analyze data describing a human genome. Now it needs just six hours. The trick is servers built with graphics chips — the sort of processors that were originally designed to draw images on your personal computer. They’re called graphics processing units, or GPUs — a term coined by chip giant Nvidia. This fall, BGI — a mega lab headquartered in Shenzhen, China — switched to servers that use GPUs built by Nvidia, and this slashed its genome analysis time by more than an order of magnitude."

Submission + - 'Seamless computing' ties all your gadgets togethe (

Eric Smalley writes: "Imagine if you could cut and paste information among your smartphone, tablet, smart table, and big screen. Better yet, what if you could flick objects from one device to another? Software developer Nsquared has tied together a Windows Phone 7, Slate tablet, Microsoft Surface smart table, and Kinect-controlled big screen into one seamless computing experience."

Submission + - Fingertip vibrator boosts your sense of touch (

Eric Smalley writes: "Combine the words "vibrator," "touch," and "heightened sensitivity," and the subject is obvious, right? A tricked-out glove that heightens your sense of touch.

The glove, developed by Georgia Tech researchers, includes a tiny vibrator that sits on the side of your finger. Turn the vibrator so low that you don't quite notice it vibrating, and voila, your fingertip is more sensitive to touch."


Submission + - Cornell software fingers fake online reviews (

Eric Smalley writes: "If you're like most people, you give yourself high ratings when it comes to figuring out when someone's trying to con you. Problem is, most people aren't actually good at it — at least as far as detecting fake positive consumer reviews. Fortunately, technology is poised to make up for this all-too-human failing. Cornell University researchers have developed software that they say can detect fake reviews."

Submission + - Cast-off gadgets peek into new owners' lives (

Eric Smalley writes: "For the project, dubbed Backtalk, researchers sent refurbished Netbooks to developing countries via nonprofit organizations. They set up the computers to record location and pictures, and send the data home to MIT--with their new owners' consent... The MIT team used the data to build visual narratives about the computers' new lives."

Submission + - Google+ invaded by multiple Mark Zuckerbergs (

Eric Smalley writes: "How many Zuckerbergs does it take to make a Google+? And how many of them can be fake or fleeting? In the past 24 hours, at least three profiles bearing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's name have appeared on Google+, Google's take on the social network: "Fake Zuckerberg," "Mark Zuckerberg" (started today), and "Mark Zuckerberg" (started yesterday)."

Submission + - Fingertip mouse fits on a ring (

Eric Smalley writes: "The MicroPointing touchpad works by detecting the force your fingertip produces as it drags across the tiny device's three sensors, according to the company's patent application. The sensors are mounted on tiny posts spaced a few tenths of a millimeter apart--less than the size of a ridge on your fingertip."

Submission + - Researchers sound off on Obama and energy (

Eric Smalley writes: "Energy in transition: researchers talk about Obama and our future — some appropriate messages on this day of transition
From the article:
I have been sitting with Steven Chu in a working group recently and have known John Holdren since my postdoc years in Berkeley (I am now 67) and hold them both in high esteem. I find it more difficult to imagine that the US can change to an energy efficient and energy conscious nation over the short time required. But I will hold my breath and see how it goes...
We need to all understand that if we don't do the fundamental science and engineering now the people of the future will not have alternatives — we'll be stuck with coal and oil, or nothing."


Submission + - Warp drive -- by the numbers (

Eric Smalley writes: ""Two Baylor University scientists have come up with a new method to cause a spaceship to effectively travel faster than the speed of light, without breaking the laws of physics."

Here's the paper: Warp Drive — A New Approach.

This would require 23rd century science and engineering, mind-boggling amounts of energy, and string theory to turn out to be right. Still, it's pretty cool science. The big question is, have they done an environmental impact study? Heaven only knows what this would do to the fabric of space-time."


Submission + - Data, three real 'bots inducted into Hall of Fame

Eric Smalley writes: "Lt. Cmdr. Data was inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame, along with three real robots: the Raibert Hopper, NavLab 5 and Lego Mindstorms. The inductions were made Tuesday at the RoboBusiness 2007 conference here in Boston. Data joins R2-D2, C-3PO and Hal among the Hall's sci-fi members. The Robot Hall of Fame was launched in 2003. Here's the CNET News story."

Thus spake the master programmer: "Time for you to leave." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"