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ESA Conducts Mars Terraforming Experiments On ISS 181

geegel writes "Space is a hostile environment for living things, but small organisms on the Expose-E experiment unit outside Europe's Columbus ISS laboratory module have resisted the solar UV radiation, cosmic rays, vacuum and varying temperatures for 18 months. A certain lichen seems to be particularly happy in open space."

Pirates as a Marketplace 214

John Riccitiello, the CEO of Electronic Arts, made some revealing comments in an interview with Kotaku about how the company's attitudes are shifting with regard to software piracy. Quoting: "Some of the people buying this DLC are not people who bought the game in a new shrink-wrapped box. That could be seen as a dark cloud, a mass of gamers who play a game without contributing a penny to EA. But around that cloud Riccitiello identified a silver lining: 'There's a sizable pirate market and a sizable second sale market and we want to try to generate revenue in that marketplace,' he said, pointing to DLC as a way to do it. The EA boss would prefer people bought their games, of course. 'I don't think anybody should pirate anything,' he said. 'I believe in the artistry of the people who build [the games industry.] I profoundly believe that. And when you steal from us, you steal from them. Having said that, there's a lot of people who do.' So encourage those pirates to pay for something, he figures. Riccitiello explained that EA's download services aren't perfect at distinguishing between used copies of games and pirated copies. As a result, he suggested, EA sells DLC to both communities of gamers. And that's how a pirate can turn into a paying customer."

Comment Re:The senators can sign a law that takes a way th (Score 1) 214

THe President's signature on a Treaty means absolutely nothing. Consider the Kyoto Treaty as an example of a Treaty signed by the USA, but never ratified by the Senate.

Ratification isn't the end of things either, consider the case of Elian Gonzalez. Or hot the US acts with respect to the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty.

Submission Happy 40th birthday, Internet

hamradio writes: September 2, 1969: Forty years ago today, in Leonard Kleinrock's UCLA lab, a group of computer scientists managed to pass bits of data from one computer to another over some some gray cable. In doing so, they created the first node of what we now call (long dramatic pause)... the Internet.
The Internet

Submission Happy birthday, Internet!

NobodyExpects writes: I'd like to wish a happy birthday to the Internet! Today marks it's 40th birthday! In fall 1969, computers sending data between two California universities set the stage for the Internet, which became a household word in the 1990s. On September 2nd 1969, in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, two computers passed test data through a 15-foot gray cable. Stanford Research Institute joined the fledging ARPANET network a month later; UC Santa Barbara and the University of Utah joined by year's end, and the internet was born.

Submission Speeding Stars in Bizarre Faraway Galaxies 1

mcgrew writes: "Space.com reports that individual stars in a very distant galaxy have been imaged for the first time, and they're moving incredibly fast, twice the speed of our sun. This is because the galaxies are massive, yet compact. The galaxy that was imaged is 11 billion light years away. It has properties that have theoists baffled.

There is much more at the above link."

Submission Possible logo for Microsoft retail stores revealed

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft has filed for the logo of its upcoming retail stores in the United States Patent and Trademark Office. As of publishing time, the status of the filing was "Newly filed application, not yet assigned to an examining attorney." Microsoft wants the design to be able to appear on various goods and services including "retail store services and online retail services featuring computers, computer hardware, software, computer games, computer peripherals, portable music players and accessories, personal digital assistants, cell phones and accessories, video game consoles and accessories, webcams, books, clothing, back packs, messenger bags, computer bags and novelty items."

In space, no one can hear you fart.