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Submission + - Is open source SNORT dead? (

alphadogg writes: Is Snort, the 12-year-old open-source intrusion detection and prevention system, dead?

The Open Information Security Foundation (OISF), a nonprofit group funded by the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security (DHS) to come up with next-generation open source IDS/IPS, thinks so. But Snort's creator, Martin Roesch, begs to differ, and in fact, calls the OISF's first open source IDS/IPS code, Suricata 1.0 released this week, a cheap knock-off of Snort paid for with taxpayer dollars.

The OISF was founded about a year and a half ago with $1 million in funding from a DHS cybersecurity research program, according to Matt Jonkman, president of OISF. He says OISF was founded to form an open source alternative and replacement to Snort, which he says is now considered dead since the research on what is supposed to be the next-generation version of Snort, Snort 3.0, has stalled.

"Snort is not conducive to IPv6 nor to multi-threading," Jonkman says, adding, "And Snort 3.0 has been scrapped."

According to Jonkman, OISF's first open source release Suricata 1.0 is superior to Snort in a number of ways, including how it can inspect network packets using a multi-threading technology to inspect more than one packet at a time, which he claims improves the chances of detecting attack traffic


Submission + - Black Licorice with Ammonium Chloride ( 1

Lott's Wife writes: When foodies talk about salt, they are usually referring to a blend of chemicals that is dominated by sodium chloride, but a Northern European treat, called salmiakki by the Finnish, is made from a different edible ionic compound — ammonium chloride. Regardless of how you feel about tasting mysterious molecules, offering the bizarre candy to your friends is a fantastic way to make them squirm while reminding them about the broader meaning of the term salt — any neutral compound that can be made by mixing an acid with a base.

Submission + - First Open Source ATI Drivers Now Available (

apokryphos writes: "After AMD partnered with SUSE to release open source specs, they have now made some alpha ATI Radeon 5xxx/6xxx drivers available, supporting initial mode settings. The next steps are adding support for more hardware, RandR 1.2 support, video overlay support and 2D acceleration. The source and packages for Fedora, Mandriva, openSUSE and SLED are available in the openSUSE Build Service, with Debian and Ubuntu packages following shortly."

Submission + - GCC Compiler will finally gets replace by BSD PCC. (

Sunnz writes: "A leaner, lighter, faster, and most importantly, BSD Licensed Compiler PCC has been imported into OpenBSD's CVS and NetBSD's pkgsrc.

The compiler is based on the original Portable C Compiler by S. C. Johnson, written in the late 70's. Even though much of the compiler has been rewritten, some of the basics still remain.

It is currently not bug-free, but it compiles on x86 platform, and works being done on it to take on GCC's job."


Submission + - 86% of users ignore internet banners (

Christopher Blanc writes: "Users tend to ignore heavily formatted areas because they look like advertisements. People looking for a number that was formatted in bold, bright red text scanned that area, but didn't actually read the number. Only 14% of them were able to read it enough to find the answer. l"

Linux Business

Submission + - Sourcefire Acquires ClamAV

Huh? writes: Looks like another popular open source project is getting gobbled up this month . Open source innovator and SNORT (R) creator, Sourcefire, Inc. (Nasdaq:FIRE), today announced that it has acquired ClamAV(TM), a leading open source gateway anti-virus and anti-malware project. Sourcefire's first acquisition since its Initial Public Offering in March 2007, ClamAV will broaden the company's open source footprint while providing the technology foundation for new products and services that will extend the company's Enterprise Threat Management network security portfolio. I sure hope Sourcefire doesn't put a 30 day delay on the ClamAV database updates for community users (i.e. non paying) like it did to the Snort VRT rules.
The Internet

Submission + - A campaign to block Firefox users ( 5

rarwes writes: A website is aiming at blocking Firefox users. This because a fraction of the Firefox users installed an Ad Blocker and thus stealing money from website owners that use ads. They recommend using IE, Opera or IE tab. From the site: Demographics have shown that not only are FireFox users a somewhat small percentage of the internet, they actually are even smaller in terms of online spending, therefore blocking FireFox seems to have only minimal financial drawbacks, whereas ending resource theft has tremendous financial rewards for honest, hard-working website owners and developers.

Submission + - MP3 patent verdict against Microsoft reversed (

silgaun writes: A judge overturned verdict against Microsoft ruling that the company had not infringed on two digital audio patents claimed by Alcatel-Lucent. The judge said that Lucent didn't hold exclusive IP rights to the MP3 format. Microsoft and other companies have been paying licensing fees for this. "The great thing about a verdict like this is it removes a cloud over the entire industry," said Jonathan Potter of the Digital Media Association trade group. atent-verdict-against/story.aspx?guid=%7B020059D1- 1820-4BE8-AE0D-655DBE5CBD35%7D

Submission + - Untapped Energy Below Us ( 1

EskimoJoe writes: "BASEL, Switzerland — When tremors started cracking walls and bathroom tiles in this Swiss city on the Rhine, the engineers knew they had a problem. "The glass vases on the shelf rattled, and there was a loud bang," Catherine Wueest, a teashop owner, recalls. "I thought a truck had crashed into the building." But the 3.4 magnitude tremor on the evening of Dec. 8 was no ordinary act of nature: It had been accidentally triggered by engineers drilling deep into the Earth's crust to tap its inner heat and thus break new ground — literally — in the world's search for new sources of energy. On paper, the Basel project looks fairly straightforward: Drill down, shoot cold water into the shaft and bring it up again superheated and capable of generating enough power through a steam turbine to meet the electricity needs of 10,000 households, and heat 2,700 homes. Scientists say this geothermal energy, clean, quiet and virtually inexhaustible, could fill the world's annual needs 250,000 times over with nearly zero impact on the climate or the environment. A study released this year by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said if 40 percent of the heat under the United States could be tapped, it would meet demand 56,000 times over. It said an investment of $800 million to $1 billion could produce more than 100 gigawatts of electricity by 2050, equaling the combined output of all 104 nuclear power plants in the U.S."

Submission + - Dell blocks installation of standard components 1

Loh Phat writes: "Hardware vendors voiding warranties or not providing support is a standard caveat across the industry, but yesterday Dell showed that withholding a $5 part is more important that future sales or bad press.

Our company purchased a Dell PowerEdge 3250 (Dual CPU Itanium) less than two years ago (still under warranty BTW) for cross platform development (yes, our customers demand support for that platform). So we purchased a unit with a single drive in a two drive system.

Its spec sheet specifies U320 SCSI drive support — a standard. See for yourself e/en/3250_specs.pdf

So when we wanted to add storage we purchased a standard U320 compatible drive and went to install it, however when we pulled the hot-swap drive sled out we noticed that it lacked mounting facilities for the drive; it curiously didn't match the existing sled in the occupied bay. They are 99% identical except for the lack of facility to actually attach a drive.

During a call to Dell "support" it seems that a year ago (a year after we bought the server and before the warranty expires) they stopped selling the drive sled capable of mounting a drive as a separate component — you can only get them, wait for it, attached to a Dell SCSI drive.

So it seems that it's OK to advertise the compatibility with industry-standard components, you just can't use them. With no pre-sales caveat that you will not be allowed to install anything standard unless it comes from Dell. Funny, the drive sled has its own part number H7206 but Dell *refused* to sell it to me.

The term "bait-and-switch" comes to mind. I'm all for caveat emptor, but a full declaration of terms is not unreasonable.

I don't mind having the freedom to be denied service or support of using non-vendor supplied parts (well, I do actually but I least know that before I buy) but in this case I'm physically prevented from doing so after the purchase.

So the question remains: are there grounds to file an anti-trust or some other complaint with the State regarding this deceptive business practice?

Regardless, they're now off the vendor list (actually I inherited the server as I would have selected another vendor in the first place). Good forward thinking there guys."

Submission + - AMD + ATI One Year Later

NerdMaster writes: Hardware Secrets posted today an in-depth analysis of the ATI+AMD deal one year after it was first announced. Their conclusions are quite amazing: "So far the big winner from the AMD-ATI deal is clearly nVidia. Today nVidia is worth two times and a half more than it was one year ago, while AMD is worth less than it was before buying ATI! This is simply amazing, AMD bought a 5 billion dollar company and instead of becoming a 15 billion dollar company nVidia was the one that became such company! Also during the last 1-year period Intel market value increased 43%."

"Atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." -- Robin, The Boy Wonder