Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re: John Oliver (Score 1) 954

You make some valid points but it's a shame you spoilt it with "ethnically-homogeneous...Confucian culture". You really should go and do some travelling or at the very least some reading.... your characterisation is profoundly ignorant.

While working on my undergrad I studied Mandarin for two years and picked up a Chinese Studies certificate. I'm an American who has been living in Japan for four years. I've also spent a year in Korea, and just returned from a month in Hanoi. Two weeks in Slovenia (a friend is a Slovenian Army officer) and two weeks in Siberia (way back when I had a Russian girlfriend) for some European exposure too.

So yes....Taiwan/Korea/Japan/Singapore largely conform to East Asian value/social systems, which stem from Confucianism. Go read some Mencius and get back to me. Filial piety runs deep out here.

The notion of filial piety, whilst expressed by confucius, is present in some form or another in _every_ non-western culture however it's the phrase "ethnically homogenous" that is troubling; japan alone has more than 300 differening ethnic groups, tawiwan has a significant aboriginal population and as for singapore whilst the chinese cohort no doubt have some confucian affectations I think it's more than a stretch to place that upon the indian, malay and aboriginal populations. Although you didn't list mainland china it's also worth pointing out the not-insignificant minority ethnic groups within its borders.

It seems that whilst you've obviously travelled extensively within asia given that you are a mandarin speaker I suspect that has lead you to viewing the region through an ethnic chinese prism.

Comment Re: John Oliver (Score 1) 954

None of the countries you list are viable examples of what we can implement for the United States. They are all small, highly-urbanized, ethnically-homogeneous, never had a large civilian proliferation of firearms to begin with, and are based on Confucian culture (with an emphasis on conformity and sacrifice for public order).

The United States is the size of a continent, possesses vast tracks of low-population-density wilderness (very difficult to efficiently patrol/police), ethnically-diverse (which, honestly, is the cause of some of internal divisions/conflicts/paranoia/crime), and with a culture of staunch individuality. We also possess ~300 million firearms, which is, IIRC, more than the rest of the entire PLANET combined.

Do you have any idea how many law enforcement personnel, how many total man-hours it would take, to have even the slightest chance of enforcing a firearms ban? Take a look at the German experience against partisans in the Eastern Theater of WW2. Too much territory to cover with too few people.

You make some valid points but it's a shame you spoilt it with "ethnically-homogeneous...Confucian culture". You really should go and do some travelling or at the very least some reading.... your characterisation is profoundly ignorant.

Submission + - Study finds that religion makes children more selfish (forbes.com) 3

Enter the Shoggoth writes: A University of Chicago study that set out to determine if cultural background has an effect on empathy and a willingness to share has found that childen with an identified religious background are statistically more likely to be selfish. The journal article (Current Biology) can be found by following a link in the original source (Forbes) below.

Submission + - Y Combinator, the X Factor of tech (economist.com)

universe520 writes: Since 2005 YC has taken on batches of promising founders, and this month will celebrate the funding of its 1,000th startup. Though about half of its startups have failed, which is typical of early-stage investing, it has had a head-turning record of success. In addition to Airbnb, YC has had a hand in Dropbox, a cloud-storage firm, and Stripe, a payments company (see table). Eight of its firms have become what Valley folk call “unicorns”, valued at $1 billion or more. Combined, the companies it has invested in are worth around $65 billion (based on their most recent funding round), although YC’s share is only a small fraction of that total—perhaps $1 billion-$2 billion. It is because of this record that YC has become a juggernaut in Silicon Valley.

Comment Re:An engineer's perspective (Score 1) 118

Bad form to reply to myself but I should point out that I mostly agree with the AC I replied to above but his/her post typifies what I believe is the biggest problem we have as a society/civilisation; we are experts in ever increasingly narrow domains of knowledge and are not just profoundly igonorant outside of that domain but as a result we are incapable of understanding our collective shortcomings or syntheisising sustainable solutions to address them.

You said

The issue is not that the engineers on this site don't understand human nature,

and then went on to completely contradict yourself

its that we don't understand how the rest of society can be so clueless of a clear solution path to our energy needs.

In the case of nuclear power, circletimessquare was mostly right, however he doesn't explicitly state that in the case of nuclear power the problems are greatly exacerbated by the time scales involved.
The length of the fuel-cycle is not just longer than a human lifetime, not just longer than the expected lifetime of a even the longest lived corporate entity, but longer than the likely length of our our civilisation.
Given a presumed understanding of human nature it is obvious to anyone who takes the time to really think about it, current nuclear power technologies are not viable.
With that said it is obvious that something needs to be done about our reliance on fossil fuels, and although many alternative energy sources are starting to look promising they are not quite there yet.
Alternate nuclear processes aught to be considered, thorium reactors seem to be the favourite on this site, the technology might be the greatest thing since sliced bread but the significant cohort of posters on this site that preach the virtues of thorium (or fusion for that matter) without any sign that they have considered that there might also be negative imapacts is ironically the reason that whilst I desipse the narrow minded, unelnightened, and ignorant management class that runs our businesses and our societies I still prefer that they run things than a bunch of (fellow) engineers.

With an IQ of 144, I just have to remind myself that 100 is the average, with half the population below and half above

This doesn't help you argument either; it never ceases to amaze that people who are clearly intelligent and work with numbers can place faith in an obviously flawed pseudo-scientific "measurement"

Comment Re:An engineer's perspective (Score 1) 118

You said

The issue is not that the engineers on this site don't understand human nature,

and then went on to completely contradict yourself

its that we don't understand how the rest of society can be so clueless of a clear solution path to our energy needs.

In the case of nuclear power, circletimessquare was mostly right, however he doesn't explicitly state that in the case of nuclear power the problems are greatly exacerbated by the time scales involved.
The length of the fuel-cycle is not just longer than a human lifetime, not just longer than the expected lifetime of a even the longest lived corporate entity, but longer than the likely length of our our civilisation.
Given a presumed understanding of human nature it is obvious to anyone who takes the time to really think about it, current nuclear power technologies are not viable.
With that said it is obvious that something needs to be done about our reliance on fossil fuels, and although many alternative energy sources are starting to look promising they are not quite there yet.
Alternate nuclear processes aught to be considered, thorium reactors seem to be the favourite on this site, the technology might be the greatest thing since sliced bread but the significant cohort of posters on this site that preach the virtues of thorium (or fusion for that matter) without any sign that they have considered that there might also be negative imapacts is ironically the reason that whilst I desipse the narrow minded, unelnightened, and ignorant management class that runs our businesses and our societies I still prefer that they run things than a bunch of (fellow) engineers.

With an IQ of 144, I just have to remind myself that 100 is the average, with half the population below and half above

This doesn't help you argument either; it never ceases to amaze that people who are clearly intelligent and work with numbers can place faith in an obviously flawed pseudo-scientific "measurement"

Comment Re:HA! (Score 1) 128

Doesn't matter. Any processor from Intel after 2011 no longer has the flaw...

Old bug; Intel knew about it in 2010; they fixed in 2011, now its on the frontpage of Slashdot in 2015..

Why is this modded 5 Informative? AC provides no evidence and in fact what AC says is completely untrue. All x86 processors are vulnerable to this kind of attack.

Comment Re:Right ... (Score 1) 117

And yet any time someone suggestes stronger regulation the entire IT community comes out up in arms and shouts "free market".

No, the CEOs say that. The rich greedy bastard maximizing executive compensation say that.

The "entire" IT community sure as hell doesn't say that. Many many people have figured out the free market is a fucking fairy tale.

The IT community is not defined by the rich assholes who get heard more often. And I'm sorry, but listening to rich assholes is the fucking problem -- because what they're telling us a self-serving lie.

There is no damned free market.

I agree with your sentiment but it has been my experience that the majority of workers in our industry are very much opposed to government interference of any kind. I am personally opposed to over regulation however I believe that our industry has gotten too much of a free pass over the years and indeed that is why the notion of a "software engineer" is a contradiction-in-terms.

Engineers are legally responsible for thier errors. Even the very small niches such as process control and biomedical the functionality of software is indemnified by a "real" engineer as a component of a larger system.

Comment Re:Right ... (Score 1) 117

How is it still legal for these companies to advertise and sell a whole product but only deliver part of it?

Because they have all the power, can simply change the fucking terms of service as they see fit, and have the fucking politicians in their pockets to ensure they can get away with it.

Honestly, are you expecting a fair situation in which the consumer actually gets input on this shit?

You might as well ask a Ferengi for favorable financing terms. If he gives them to you, they're not favorable.

Why do we keep acting like we're surprised by any of this crap? Unless people start changing laws to shift the balance away from corporations, this is all you'll ever get.

And yet any time someone suggestes stronger regulation the entire IT community comes out up in arms and shouts "free market".

The greatest strength of the IT industry is that it's essentially unregulated allowing it to be nimble and to take risks.

The greatest weakness of the IT industry is that it's essentially unregulated allowing companies to shit all over thier customers.

Slashdot Top Deals

Real Users never know what they want, but they always know when your program doesn't deliver it.

Working...