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Comment: stingray - groundwork for criminalizing use of (Score 1) 249

So the large majority of content on my phone is illegal to search without a warrant
And it gets there from the internet, and goes to secure places on the internet through radio waves

At what point does the use of a stingray without a warrant violate civil rights here?

Comment: It is enough to make a big brother (Score 1) 64

by EngineeringStudent (#47298883) Attached to: New Sensors Will Scoop Up "Big Data" On Chicago

MIT has "I track body motion by how it disturbs cell signals" technology. Look it up.
They are talking about literally the ability to track everyone all the time without implanting a chip.

"It is all fun and games until" this system tracks mouth motion of two dirty chicago politicians - and that data can be used against them.

Comment: Economics 101 (Score 1) 538

by EngineeringStudent (#47291553) Attached to: Teaching College Is No Longer a Middle Class Job

There is an infinite supply of cash in the form of student loans that schools have access to. They have increasing demand no matter how high they raise the price.

Quality is no longer a differentiating factor in the nature of the product - why not water it down to maximize revenue?

Oh - you want ethically competent students graduating college? Are you willing to pay for that??

(end cynical comment)

Comment: Weak (Score 1) 340

A good fab will cost ~7 billion dollars. A few million dollars is not enough to staff basic operations for a year.
Making chips from Intel spin-off ARM derived engineering isn't the same as making your own.

It is not remotely in-house development. It does not remotely remove the "built-in backdoor" problem. It does not remotely make Russia self-sustainable in terms of design, fabrication, production, distribution, or utilization.

At best this is very weak propaganda for people who know nothing about silicon.

Comment: Ignorance usually leads to inequity (Score 1) 649

There is not one creationism. To treat it as a monolith is false.

Old-earth creationists are given short shrift in this approach - an approach that is not about being anti-religious. Atheism is not the same thing as pro-Scientific.

Questions of the super-natural are, by definition, outside of the scope of proper science. Science is about the natural.

Comment: Then they learned nothing from Snowden (Score 2) 253

This is going to come out. Not if, just when.
When it does - lots of local heads will roll. Politically, not literally.

The scope is very large. The level of participation is very large. The value of a leak is huge, so the first leaker wins the lottery - made for life. Do police get paid enough for that to make economic sense? nope.

The blowback for those who administer this outside of "required to cooperate" is huge. The only response of the leaders that gets them off the hook is to pass that buck upward. "The law made me do it" or "the feds made me do it" will save their careers, some.

Eventually it has to break. How is it handled at that point?
Look at the NSA/Cisco/IBM related consequences of Snowden and imagine that at a local level.

That or those who rule by consent of the governed would want to educate and train the people (not serfs) under them so that there is sustainable rule of law AND good quality of freedom enjoyed in the land of the free, home of the brave, place where justice wears a blindfold. Too bad those way up in power are less interested in that quality - they are the ones with the greatest ability to support it.

Comment: Its Cisco's money, but not mine (Score 1) 337

by EngineeringStudent (#47212377) Attached to: Cisco Opposes Net Neutrality

Cisco can make lots of money selling hardware that moves different streams at different speeds.

I don't like it. I don't have to buy their products. I don't have to shop at places that use them for infrastructure. I don't have to support politicians that want to break net neutrality.

Cisco may see that sort of (blood) money in their future, but it isn't going to be coming out of my pocket. Maybe some other folks agree.

Comment: Where is the money (Score 1) 202

by EngineeringStudent (#47128159) Attached to: Scientists Find Method To Reliably Teleport Data

I think they are working to answer a good question, but not necessarily a high value question. Why does distance matter? Scientific inquiry is good, but the goal is return of value to humanity. If you worked on making computer parts that could transmit information faster and more reliably over a very short distance, somewhere between a meter and a millimeter, then you could plausibly improve the lives of most of the folks on the planet, or at least enable them to check slashdot or facebook more cheaply.

Comment: This is the tail - it means more (Score 3, Informative) 172

by EngineeringStudent (#46825131) Attached to: Asteroid Impacts Bigger Risk Than Thought

We don't have enough history to gauge what actually has happened over time, so we have to estimate.
We approximate by finding big rocks or chemistry on earth, looking at craters on the moon, or this.

In all these cases we are using the small but frequent to infer the distribution of big but hugely problematic events. Our best answer the question about the likelihood of a killer impact is grossly changed if this tail is changed.

Think about it like floods. We ask how likely a 10,000 year flood is going to happen next year. We have ~100 years of rainfall data. We fit it to a distribution that is appropriate and then use those fit parameters to make a best guess. If our rain gauge was only measuring half the rain, we might under-estimate the actual risk by a factor of 10x or 20x.

There is good correlation between "killer impacts" and location of the sun in the galaxy (yes it moves around). We are starting to enter a higher risk region (transition to edge of arm) and perhaps the fundamental distribution is changing. In that case the history of craters on the moon or other might not be meaningful indicator of the near future.

Considering this I think good tracking is not a bad idea and should be thought out well and properly considered.

ASCII a stupid question, you get an EBCDIC answer.

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