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Comment: OS X (Score 1) 408

by Emperor Tiberius (#45697573) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Would You Secure Your Parents' PC?
Seriously. Just get a refurbished iMac and put it in there.

I converted my parents a few years back and was so happy when I could finally stop cleaning up virus and malware laden crap. Even better, when I came to visit, I wasn't scared shitless that there were any key loggers or other unpleasantry installed. Yes, I know OS X isn't malware-proof, but it "feels" less vulnerable than what they had. The OS is set to automatically update along with their apps and everything is automagically backed up with Time Machine. My Dad still likes to play games in Windows; running Boot Camp and Deep Freeze keeps things happy there and when they want to surf, they just boot back into OS X.

Comment: Re:Fine by me (Score 1) 153

Except you're missing out on ABE and some of the more advanced features of NoScript. ScriptSafe also hasn't been updated in over five months. The last time I used it, it had some pretty frustrating bugs that made me go back to Firefox and NoScript. Maybe as it improves, I'll give it another shot, but not now...

Comment: maildir + mutt + maildir-utils (Score 1) 282

Simple. Archive mail by the year as it gets too big. Use mutt's search for the basic searching and maildir-utils for the heavy lifting.

To those saying keeping email forever is hoarding: not if it's done right. You'd be surprised how useful it is to go back and find an email from four years ago.

Comment: No privacy (Score 4, Insightful) 113

by Emperor Tiberius (#43132973) Attached to: Harvard Secretly Searched Deans' Email
When are people going to learn that they have no privacy on their employer's computer systems? Geeks and IT folks seem to have the biggest problem with this. If you really need that privacy, go out to your car on your lunch hour and use your smartphone. At the end of the day, it's your employer's power, bandwidth, space, and equipment. If they want to monitor their systems, they have every right to do so. Now obviously, some monitoring is a huge gray area when it comes to moral and ethical issues. So why not simply side step the issue by using your own person accounts, devices, and access?

Comment: Online courses provide no added incentive (Score 1) 215

by Emperor Tiberius (#42961099) Attached to: The Two Big Problems With Online College Courses
I went to college when technologies like Blackboard were just beginning to come to fruition. The problem I've always had with online courses is that they give you no added incentive to do to the work. Motivation may be its own reward for some people, but I still need that subtle "mental push" to succeed. A class set in an actual classroom gives my brain some reason to be there and do the work. Online courses just makes me think they're available "whenever." The concept of deadlines and necessity quickly goes out the window, usually along with my grades.

People don't drop these courses, because they don't remember them and/or don't think about them. The same goes for "hybrid" online courses, where you still spend some class time in a physical classroom. You're not getting enough cues to actually realize you're doing poorly. The instructor is also poorly interfaced with the class that they don't match a student's online progress with their physical presence.

Maybe working on your day's assignment in your PJs at 3 a.m. appeals to you. I still want to see and talk to the instructor. I need that "meat space" interaction.

Comment: Good ol' fashioned attendance (Score 1) 288

by Emperor Tiberius (#39463041) Attached to: Brazilian Schoolchildren Tagged By Computer Chips
Whatever happened to good ol' fashioned attendance? Back when I was going to school, it was done with Scantron forms. The teacher took attendance and sent a runner to deliver the form(s) to the attendance office where they were processed. Once it was determined that a kid was out that shouldn't have been, that office called the parent to ascertain where the kid was. Simple, effective, and hardly Orwellian.

Don't get me started on taking attendance in college courses, though...

Comment: Ouch (Score 1) 227

by Emperor Tiberius (#33572784) Attached to: Criminals Steal House Thanks To Hacked Email
I sort of think he should have kept a better eye on his properties, but that's neither here nor there.

Fundamentally, I think this is why we need some form of authentication that "only you know," but everyone can verify/authenticate against. Most places -foolishly- usually social security numbers here in the 'states. I think that's a terrible idea as the protections surrounding them are incredibly weak. I was going to suggest this fellow have some sort of PGP/GPG setup, but if the criminals got into his email, they'd probably have his passphrase(s) and key(s), too.

Sigh...
The Internet

Washington Wants 10,000 Web Surfers 147

Posted by kdawson
from the you-only-have-to-wire-money-to-this-account dept.
crimeandpunishment writes "This one sounds too good to be true: surf the Web, and you'll be helping the government. The FCC is looking for 10,000 volunteers to take part in a study to determine if broadband providers are really providing Internet connections that are as fast as advertised. The broad look at broadband will involve special equipment installed in homes across the country to measure Internet connections and compare them to advertised speeds." Here's where to go to apply.
Iphone

+ - Android working on the iPod Touch 1G->

Submitted by dreadpirate15
dreadpirate15 (1677324) writes "A couple years ago, I stumbled upon the Linux on iPhone blog. I was really quite intrigued by it An open OS on Apple hardware? Perfect! Open software plus beautiful hardware. Awesome. So I followed it I kept the site in my RSS reader And nothing. No updates for the longest time. I was getting discouraged, thinking that my only way of getting Android was to buy a smartphone. Then, I got an update. Planetbeing had done it! He’d quietly reverse engineered the drivers for the iPhone 2G, and got Android actually working on it! I was thrilled, and anxiously followed his updates. When he got Android working on the iPhone 3G, I rejoiced, knowing the iPod Touch 1G would surely come soon. It took a while, but this morning I got it working. I wrote a tutorial detailing how anyone can get it working themself! Here is the link: iDroid on the iPod Touch 1G."
Link to Original Source
The Military

+ - V-22 Osprey: “Flying Shame” or future ->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In 2007 Time magazine referred to the V-22 Osprey as A Flying Shame. But as military and aviation writer Richard Whittle relates in his new book The Dream Machine, the history of the V-22 Osprey—a multi-mission tiltrotor aircraft—is as complex as the engineering challenges that had to be overcome to build it. But has the Osprey, with all of its failures, tainted the tiltrotor concept? Or much like the Concorde, will tiltrotor technology remain too expensive to be commercially viable?"
Link to Original Source
Medicine

+ - Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller

Submitted by
Pickens
Pickens writes "US News and World Reports reports that the needle pricks involved in acupuncture may help relieve pain by triggering a natural painkilling chemical called adenosine, and that acupuncture's effectiveness can be enhanced by coupling the process with a well-known cancer drug — deoxycoformycin — that maintains adenosine levels longer than usual. Working exclusively with mice, Dr. Maiken Nedergaard, co-director of the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center and her colleagues administered half-hour acupuncture treatments to a group with paw discomfort. The investigators found adenosine levels in tissue near the needle insertion points was 24 times greater after treatment, and those mice with normal adenosine function experienced a two-thirds drop in paw pain. By contrast, mice that were genetically engineered to have no adenosine function gained no benefit from the treatment. However many remain skeptical of acupuncture claims. Ed Tong writes in Discover Magazine that previous clinical trials have used sophisticated methods to measure the benefits of acupuncture, including “sham needles”, where the needle’s point retracts back into the shaft like the blade of a movie knife to determine if the benefits of acupuncture are really only due to the placebo effect. "Last year, one such trial (which was widely misreported) found that acupuncture does help to relieve chronic back pain and outperformed “usual care”. However, it didn’t matter whether the needles actually pierce the skin, because sham needles were just as effective," writes Tong. "Nor did it matter where the needles were placed, contrary to what acupuncturists would have us believe.""

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