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Comment Phew, I was worried there for a second. (Score 5, Insightful) 158

Thank God my Credit Card numbers weren't breached, because those are impossible to cancel and replace. I'm so thankful it was only my Passport number, Driver's License number, social security number, full legal name, birth date, and address that were stolen, because those are a snap to cancel and replace.


UK Gamers Can Now Get Their Money Back For Publishers' Broken Promises 73

An anonymous reader writes: An amendment to the UK Consumer Rights Act regarding digital-only purchases seems to give British videogamers redress towards publishing houses which deliver buggy code or inveigle consumers to pre-order games based on trailers or betas that demonstrate features, characters or quality not delivered in the RTM release. But the legislation is so loosely worded as to be an invitation to litigation and interpretation, and does not address mis-delivery issues for consumer models such as cloud subscriptions.

Comment Clarification? (Score 1) 106

Is the bug in TrueCrypt, or is the bug in Windows? It seems to me that Windows should be able to stop a limited user from gaining administrative privileges, regardless of the software that is being used to attempt it.

Why is it the responsibility of TrueCrypt to prevent user rights elevation in Windows? It thought that was Windows' responsibility.

The Courts

California Overturns Uber's Appeal: Its Drivers Are Employees, Not Contractors 367

An anonymous reader writes: Uber's third attempt to overturn a California court ruling stating that its drivers are employees and not contractors has ended in failure, with the appeal dismissed by the California Employment Development Department (EDD). The California Labor Commission ruled in June on the matter, and in a later appeal one judge effectively decided that the difference between 'firing' a driver and deactivating their account is purely semantic.

UK Researchers Developing Influenza-Resistant Birds 54

New submitter ravensmith0821 writes: UK researchers are working on disease-resistant chickens, adding a gene to eggs before they hatch that renders the bird less susceptible to avian influenza. Reuters reports: "Their research, which has been backed by the UK government and top chicken companies, could potentially prevent repeats of this year's wipeout: 48 million chickens and turkeys killed because of the disease since December in the United States alone. But these promising chickens - injected with a fluorescent protein to distinguish them from normal birds in experiments - won't likely gatecrash their way into poultry production any time soon. Health regulators around the world have yet to approve any animals bred as genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for use in food because of long-standing safety and environmental concerns."

Comment What About Nutrition? (Score 5, Insightful) 122

The article (or shall I say shameless advertisement) goes out of its way to talk about how much they shower the growing plants with "nutrients," but says not one iota about the nutritional content of the final product and how it compares to organic or conventionally grown produce.

Comment Re:Yes (Score 1) 698

Except "being necessary ... militia ..." is not an operative clause, it is a prefatory clause. The operative clause is "the right of the people ... shall not be infringed."

Prefatory clauses are used to give some reasoning or approach, but not a binding condition.

You could rearrange the second amendment in today's parlance as such:

"The Right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed for reasons including, but not limited to, that a functioning and ready militia is necessary to the security of a free state."

"Confound these ancestors.... They've stolen our best ideas!" - Ben Jonson